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Topic: The random RESIN question thread!  (Read 281409 times)
Tags for this thread: resin , mold , catalyst , resin_problems  Add new tag
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1670 on: December 13, 2011 10:06:25 AM »

Quote
. . .cassiem, I use the Castin' Craft resin and just made some up this weekend. . .The Castin' Craft is pretty easy to use since you use equal parts of it.

vampedangel14 ...it's probably best to refer to the Easy Cast product just as "Easy Cast" since the primary resin that the company called Castin' Craft has always made (and been famous for) is a polyester resin (Castin' Craft Clear Polyester Casting Resin) that's been nicknamed "Castin' Craft" over the years. 
Polyester resins are not mixed one to one, but a few drops of one to a lot of the other, and also are fiddlier to use and harder on lungs, etc, than epoxy resins. It's really easy to get mixed up between the types of resin, and a lot of people have used the wrong terms or not understood there were important differences--in fact maybe most people in the beginning unless they worked with more than one kind, and there have been many misunderstandings.

Quote
I wish they had the bigger bottles at Michaels since I have only used the stuff twice now and my bottles are already half gone!

Epoxy resins are more expensive by volume than polyester resins, but mostly they don't come a lot cheaper than what you'll see at Michaels --though slightly larger containers can be purchased in various places.

Quote
. . . The pendants and bangle were done using actual resin moulds in a flexible plastic. They finished curing yesterday and popped right out. They are completely clear and the part that was to the air is also very clear and smooth not sticky at all. They are still a tad flexible so once they harden up more (assuming they will). . .

The plastic molds you have that worked well are probably HDPE (High Density PolyEthylene plastic) and that's the primary material used to make the molds sold for resin (polypropylene works too, I think).
Flexible cloudy-plastic items like Rubbermaid and Tupperware containers, etc, are made from the same material and work well, but unless they're handled carefully (like never even wiping them to dry, etc) they can get teeny-teeny scratches which will make the surface of the mold microscopically ragged and create cloudy surfaces in the resin.
Silicone molds can have or get teenily-uneven surfaces too, and they can also create surface problems created by the fact that they're flexible though latex and rubber RTV mold materials are worse for that. 

As for the flexibility of the cast items, since you were using Easy Cast instead of a regular epoxy resin, the items could remain flexible where they're thin enough when in warm situations unfortunately.

Quote
. . . I got the Castin' Craft "EasyCast Clear Casting Epoxy" - it tells me to do even parts, which is comforting  . .

cassiem... Easy Cast is an epoxy resin but one that's been tweaked so that it can be used to make thicker items in deeper molds like the polyester resins can, but still be mixed one to one (and also be better for breathing/lungs like other epoxy resins are compared to polyesters). 
The disadvantages to Easy Cast though are that if it's exposed to even body heat after curing, its surface can become a little soft and any thin areas will become flexible. 
(The most common brand of regular epoxy resin is probably Envirotex Lite, and it should be available at most all craft and hobby stores, and often also in small hardware stores like Ace/etc.  Regular epoxy resins shouldn't be poured deeper than 1/4 -1/2" at a time though if you want the cast to be very clear.)

I'm not too familiar with the UV resins or the one-part resins, but I've heard the UV ones (usually 2-part though) can get bubbles and otherwise be more unpredictable than regular epoxies or polyesters, as well as being more expensive by volume.  There's some info on some of the one-part ones on the page at my site about resins (see link below) if you're interested though (...the one-parters have problems too, but it's what you're doing and the effect you're after that will decide which kind of resin will work best or even okay).

Quote
- I plan to use it to fill over pictures inside bezels.

As for using bezels, there you're pouring the resin in a very shallow area which is cell (not a mold) since you won't be removing it.  So regular epoxy resins will do fine since the resulting resin won't be thick, and epoxies are generally the ones used in those situations rather than polyesters**. 
Also, putting resins in cells is different from putting them in molds in that you won't be seeing the part of the cured resin that had contacted anything (and that area could end up cloudy if there were any micro-scratches, etc) since it won't be the "top" of the cast resin item, it will be the bottom of the fill. 

In fact for just doing the kind of thing you're talking about, you could even use clear fingernail polish for acrylic fingernails, or other things like clear gloss polyurethane, etc.  And some people use the "dimensional glues" but those are scratchable so usually a layer of polyurethane is needed over them unless they're well down in the bezel so protected somewhat by the walls.

Some "pictures" will need to be sealed before pouring resin over and there are some other tricks about doing that kind of thing in bezels and other "cells," so you might want to check out that this page at my site on resins and click on the sub-category called In Permanent Cells--Bottlecaps, Etc for those tips.
http://glassattic.com/polymer/other_materials.htm

**Polyester resins won't fully-cure well on any surface that's in contact with air during curing--it's supposed to be that way so that surface can stick to more layers of fiberglass cloth, etc, that might be added.  There are some workarounds for that though (check the link just above for that, and look under the category on Polyester Resins).
Epoxies will cure fully in areas that are in contact with air.




« Last Edit: December 13, 2011 10:38:30 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
tickled_sidhe
« Reply #1671 on: January 03, 2012 02:29:50 PM »

I'm on board. I have bought easy cast from Micheals, I have a few moulds and I'm waiting for a day when my 3 year old is not around to go on my maiden resin voyage.

question though, everything I read has big TOXIC warnings... "do this outside, wear a mask" and so on. So, how toxic is it? I obviously am not going to do this with my child around and it just dumped 50 cms of snow on our heads so i'm not heading outside...

what do you do? advice? big warnings of "TURN BACK NOW"Huh
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vampedangel14
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« Reply #1672 on: January 04, 2012 06:35:42 AM »

I did mine inside with no problem. If you have a mask you should wear it and you definitely want to wear gloves. Make sure your work area is covered with newspapers or something to protect the surface. If you spill anything you want to clean it up before it hardens or it will remain there! I have a silicone sheet I use when I do stuff with clay so I did the resin stuff over that since any resin I spill and miss will just pop right off.
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tickled_sidhe
« Reply #1673 on: January 13, 2012 06:51:13 AM »

What do you use to put holes in it for necklaces earrings and such?
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Kizzie421
« Reply #1674 on: February 23, 2012 06:06:58 PM »

First I want to say if this has been asked and answered before sorry, I tried to read through this thread but with it now at 168 pages thats a lot of info!

My question is can I color resin with mica powders? I understand this will make the resin appear cloudy or give it a matte finish but that is kinda the look I want.

I have not purchased any resin yet, but I am starting to look into adding this to my huge list of hobbies.

A lot of the questions I had floating around in my head have already been answered by reading through about 30 pages of this post
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #1675 on: February 23, 2012 10:02:37 PM »

Yes, you definitely can.  Mica is rock and can take a lot of heat among other things.  The mica won't make your resin matte though since all of the mica particles will still be under the outermost area of resin, which naturally cures glossy; if you want a more satin appearance, you can always apply a coat of satin/semi-gloss polyurethane to the cured resin (or even perhaps abrade the surface a little then buff by hand).

In fact, a lot of particulate materials can be used as "inclusions" in resins, and most small items can be "embedded" too. There are only a few that won't work well.
All materials used must be totally dry though; porous materials and non-permanent pigments will often need to be sealed first; and items with lots of little crevices are often dipped in resin before embedding since bubbles can hide in those areas. 

If you want to color resin evenly with color, you can use artists oil paints, shavings from oil pastels, or the special colorants sold for resins, but water-based colorants like acrylic paints can cause bubbling, etc.

If you're interested, check out this page at my site for lots of info on the kinds of resin there are and brand names, how to use them, how to color them, and much more:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/other_materials.htm
(...it's a long page but not nearly as long as the many posts in this thread!)
I've written a few other summaries about resins at YA too if you're interested...here are some of them:
http://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091115185640AAXBfZF
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100402061140AAD0jwB
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100206091500AA7eXFv
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100521191232AACynOx

HTH,
Diane B.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2012 10:17:04 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Kizzie421
« Reply #1676 on: February 24, 2012 05:43:07 AM »

Thank you Diane b! I read most of your post in this thread, I will check out your site too.

I would like to use mica powders because I have a huge collection since that is what I use for my makeup. I am actually happy that the resin will stay glossy, because I have some sick looking metallic mica powders.
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katieanne93
« Reply #1677 on: June 14, 2012 11:52:16 AM »

I am trying to get my resin into the shape of a raindrop but I do not like the teardrop molds. I found this one:

http://www.etsy.com/listing/97301366/resin-mold-ashtray-paisley-8-21cm?ref=sr_gallery_2&ga_search_query=Paisley+mold&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_ship_to=ZZ&ga_min=0&ga_max=0&ga_search_type=supplies&ga_facet=suppliesPaisley+mold

What I want to know is what happens if I use this mold to create the base, and then once it is set up completely pour more resin into the cavity. If I use the same clear color will it be visible? If I use another color, will it stick or fall out? Any information you can provide would be great. I have never worked with resin before on my own.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2012 11:57:38 AM by katieanne93 » THIS ROCKS   Logged
GoldenSunshine
« Reply #1678 on: July 04, 2012 08:40:54 PM »

Nobody hasn't replied in here for a bit. I hope someone comes forward to help me!!  Undecided
 I have decided to move on to make resin pendants, well I have EnviroTex Lite brand and I had this kit since 2007. And now it is 2012 and I tried pouring resin in a silicon mold with sprinkles and they came out just fine, but it seems cloudy looking and maybe a bit soft? Do you think the resin kit is old now?
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I looking for fabrics! Willing to do a fabric exchange or some kind of swap.

I am up for private swap for Teesha Moore patches!! PM me if  you are interested! :-D
Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #1679 on: July 05, 2012 07:59:35 AM »

Unfortunately, most resins have a shelf life of only a year or so (even if stored properly).  You'll probably just need to bite the bullet and buy more unless you somehow introduced moisture into your cast (by not sealing porous materials, etc), not mixing the parts thoroughly, etc.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012 08:00:16 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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