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Topic: The random RESIN question thread!  (Read 393378 times)
Tags for this thread: resin , mold , catalyst , resin_problems  Add new tag
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sandracb
« Reply #1540 on: May 05, 2010 06:24:42 PM »

Oh, i just saw you do bigger pieces, not small jewelry like me.  In that light, i'd still suggest lining the bottom in clear packing tape and try using the foam brush instead, never got lines from that Smiley

The compound will give a soft gloss look instead of HIGH gloss look, so just a thought Smiley
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Bellazeus
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« Reply #1541 on: May 05, 2010 06:35:54 PM »

Thanks.. did the packaging tape.. am going to do buy a foam brush and try and at least even out the brush strokes i do have! Smiley

at least i dont have to coat the back as that will be felted!
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LintBunny
« Reply #1542 on: May 12, 2010 01:59:50 PM »

 I've been making polymer clay jewelry for some time, as well as casting small and simple resin pieces, and it occurred to me that it would be nice to make custom molds of my polymer clay work so I could have unique resin pieces (rather than using the same molds everyone else can go out and buy). This leaves me with some dilemmas: how to make plenty of quality molds, and how to add the colored details.

First question, mold making:
I have seen two part mold builders for making a flexible mold, but I want to be able to make multiple cavities (so I can cast several pieces at once and not have to fiddle with multiple molds) and I have heard mold building latex leaves an inferior finish at times (not glossy like a commercial mold).

Has anyone tried vacuum forming molds? Know of any other techniques? Is a two part mold builder a good option, or would that yield a poor result for this technique?

I didn't make this piece, but this is a good example of what I have in mind:



Second question, adding color details:

Okay, I know you can color resin and layer colors, but what would be the best method for adding more detailed color changes? Would I be able to use enamel paints or another paint product to add details after the resin has fully cured, or would it peel (the way paint peels from plastics...even that silly spray paint made for plastic!)

Is it possible to brush colored resin into the mold (in detail areas) and pour in a colored background?

(Also, I am sorry if there is an answer in the general questions about resin thread, I couldn't find an answer searching and the thread is too long to read in its entirety)

Again, this isn't my work, but represent what I am going for...some details seem to be colored resin and others seem painted?

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booglass
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« Reply #1543 on: May 16, 2010 06:07:35 AM »

All interesting questions for which I don't have an answer.  But I would be curious to know.  I have just started fiddling with resin myself and so far have had mixed results.  I made my own molds.  But my pieces have lots of detail. 
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1544 on: May 16, 2010 10:44:20 AM »

Quote
First question, mold making:
I have seen two part mold builders for making a flexible mold, but I want to be able to make multiple cavities (so I can cast several pieces at once and not have to fiddle with multiple molds) and I have heard mold building latex leaves an inferior finish at times (not glossy like a commercial mold).

I'm a little confused about exactly what you're wanting, but the most common "good" material for making one's own molds to use with resins is 2-part silicone putty.  The latex stuff doesn't have nearly as smooth a surface as silicone, and even silicone comes in different qualities (e.g., the Amazing Mold Putty available at some craft/hobby stores isn't as smooth as Miracle Mold or Alley Goop).  These are really simple to use too, but can get expensive if you want to make a lot of molds or big sheet molds, for example.
There's lots of info on brands and types of silicone mold making putties on this page of my site, as well as about various other kinds of materials that can be used to make molds if you want to check it out:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/molds.htm ...click on 2-Part Silicone...Putties

As for the "multiple cavities so I can cast several pieces at once and not have to fiddle with multiple molds," I'm guessing you might be asking about sheet molds?  
If so, as mentioned 2-part silicones would be a little expensive for the sheet areas that wouldn't be used but there's no reason you couldn't make the sheet part from something else then just put your various molds into it (e.g., using polymer clay, or air-dry clay, or corrugated cardboard with holes or with rings of scrunched aluminum foil rings glued to the top of it or caulking, or even latex mold material, etc.).   If you meant something else by multiple "cavities" though, describe that part again.

Diane B.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2010 11:37:08 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Diane B.
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« Reply #1545 on: May 16, 2010 11:06:17 AM »

Quote
Second question, adding color details:
Okay, I know you can color resin and layer colors, but what would be the best method for adding more detailed color changes? Would I be able to use enamel paints or another paint product to add details after the resin has fully cured, or would it peel (the way paint peels from plastics...even that silly spray paint made for plastic!)
Is it possible to brush colored resin into the mold (in detail areas) and pour in a colored background?


Now for your second question, there's cured resin and still-liquid resin.  

There are opaque colorants you can buy (or use artists oil paints or oil pastel shavings) that might be okay next to still-raw resin, or you could perhaps wait for some types to totally dry before adding the resin--which could take a while for some paints.  
As for "painting" the colorants into the mold first, not sure that most colorants would stick to most of the mold materials used for resins (that's the point of using those mold materials), but I assume that any lower contained areas that could simply be used as cavities would be okay; then let those gel or cure, and add the background-color resin.

As for painting on top of cured resins, I believe that "glass paints" will work on cured plastics (and on glass, etc.) though think they're transparent colorants? (you could perhaps add "white," or some white paints to them though to make the colors opaque since white always has to be opaque--though wouldn't work for really dark colors).
I think you should also be able to paint on them with acrylics since I know that water-based sealers (like clear polyurethanes, etc) can be used, on epoxy resins at least. Acrylics would probably take a few coats though, and might require roughing the surface a bit first.  And they might require a coating of polyurethane or of epoxy resin to hold them on better.
Or perhaps you could paint on top of them with colored resin then let cure...you'd probably want to tint the painting resin with opaque colorants though if you don't want them to be translucent, or to use opaque colorants in the original cast resin.  
I don't know a lot about this part though, so just guesses.

Why wouldn't you just want to make items like those painted-on ones below from polymer clay though since they'd look indistinguishable from those, and since there are also lots of mold-making possibilities for polymer clay? --from clay or other materials-- and since polymer clay can be totally painted on top of usually with acrylics or alcohol inks, or partly painted or "antiqued"/etc, or painted with tinted liquid clays, or the colors can all come from colored clays, etc, so you'd have a load of choices.

Diane B.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2010 11:24:29 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
LintBunny
« Reply #1546 on: May 17, 2010 06:36:04 AM »

Acrylics really wouldn't work, I was thinking of model paints or some other type pf enamel (I was hoping someone else would know what sticks well, since I know some artists use resin to build their own models).

I've been wanting to cast more of my work in resin instead of they polymer clay because even the best clay under the best conditions still isn't very durable in small pieces, and since I sell my work I'd really like to make sure it lasts.

I was talking about a sheet mold (a "cavity" is the depression in a mold). Smiley
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1547 on: May 20, 2010 11:07:45 AM »

Quote
I've been wanting to cast more of my work in resin instead of they polymer clay because even the best clay under the best conditions still isn't very durable in small pieces, and since I sell my work I'd really like to make sure it lasts.

Hmmm, not sure I understand.  They're both plastics, and polymer clay should last as long or longer than resin as long as it's a good strong brand, thoroughly polymerized-cured, and well put together if there are thin or projecting areas.  In fact, resins can be more brittle than polymer clay. 
What kinds of problems are you having, in which situations? 

(And are you thinking of clear resins, or the opaque kinds used for making multiple sculpts from molds and sold as figurines, etc?)

Diane B.

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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
hello color!
« Reply #1548 on: May 24, 2010 11:26:05 AM »

1) Molding

Silicone putty is a good option because silicone is the best class of mold-making materials. However, liquid silicone is much better for making molds with multiple cavities. Most liquid silicones need to be vacuumed (which btw is different from vacuum forming), the equipment for which costs hundreds of dollars, but there are a few that do not. Oomoo 30 by Smooth On is one of them, and in general, it's the best "starter" silicone that I know. You won't be able to use it to make molds of highly detailed things with it, but it'll be just fine for the types of things in your pictures.

2) Coloring

Things in your pictures are made commercially, and things in the two pictures are made using two different methods. Commercial casting is completely different from casting at home. So... don't even try to figure out how it was done because it will not help you. I'm too lazy to type it out, but, just trust me, it won't. Instead, think about your problem in isolation.

Now, one problem that is probably common is, people attempt to paint their casts as is, the way they come out from the mold, without doing any kind of prep first. This does not work (usually, unless you get lucky) because the casts are still be covered by mold release - which will release the paint from the cast. And, you have to use a release because not doing so shortens the number of casts you'll be able  to make with your mold before it breaks down. So, what some people do to avoid having to remove the release is, they spray primer directly into the mold prior to casting. The primer acts as release, and you don't need to remove anything prior to painting.

You can get more details on this technique and find out what paints work by searching taxidermy forums. (I don't care for painting my casts, myself, so this is about it that I remember off-hand.)

Btw, brushing colored resin in some parts of the mold is not much different from layering. However, resin is a bit more viscous than paint, so you won't be able to get a whole lot of detail that way.
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LegendofStarLord
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« Reply #1549 on: May 29, 2010 09:42:15 AM »

Hi! I have been wondering where I might be able to buy some Resin... Would I find it at a craft store, like Micheals or Hobby Lobby? If so, where would it be located?
Thanks
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