A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
News: Craftster Best of 2014 have been announced!  Check out the winning projects here!
Total Members: 301,079
Currently Running With Scissors:
425 Guests and 7 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: 1 2 [All]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Toe up socks? Maybe it's not for me *sigh*  (Read 2968 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
karynlibrarian
I finallly have a blog!
Offline Offline

Posts: 106
Joined: 02-Apr-2006

View Profile WWW
« on: June 23, 2006 01:14:11 PM »

I have been trying all week to cast on a pair of toe up socks.  Needless to say, I've been VERY unsuccessful.

Let me see if I remember the chronology.  Tried the yarn over short row method...it was a mess, I couldn't figure out the yarn overs when purling.
Tried the wrap short row method (they all make it sound so easy!)...FAILED.  Resorted to the turkish cast on method...ended up with huge holes.  Am I the only person who can't do this?Huh he he he  My last series of failed attempts was the figure 8 cast-on.

I'm pretty determined to master toe up socks...but ANY tips/advice would be greatly appreciated!!!!!

Thanks for reading!

Karynlibrarian
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Fozziebear54
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2006 02:19:19 PM »

This Knitty article gives a couple of variations of toes for a toe-up sock. You've already tried the short row and figure 8 toes, so those parts of the articles probably won't help you, but there is also the Easy Toe, which, as its name suggests, is easier than the other two. Basically, you just knit a rectangle and then, knitting circularly and using stitches from both sides of the rectangle, gradually increase the number of stitches to the total number you need for the sock.

Short rows can take a bit of getting used to. I just made my third pair of socks using the short row method (both heels and toes, using wraps) and this is the first pair that actually came out decently. (My last try was an overambitious self-designed fair isle sock. The colorwork part came out GREAT - but I very badly messed up around the heel and thus the socks are unwearable, unless my feet suddenly get smaller.)

My advice is just to keep trying. Take some random, leftover skein from a past project and practice the various methods until you're comfortable with at least one of them. Also do extensive searching online to find picture tutorials of the various methods. (This, for instance, looks like a good yarn-over short row tutorial.) Toe up socks aren't any more difficult than cuff down socks, and socks in general aren't any more difficult than whatever stitch pattern you use.  Just stay calm about it all. Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged

karynlibrarian
I finallly have a blog!
Offline Offline

Posts: 106
Joined: 02-Apr-2006

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2006 04:58:56 PM »

Thanks for your reply!  My first attempt was using the tutorial that you linked to.  I failed miserably.

My whole reason for wanting to try toe up socks is that I have two beautiful skeins of cashmere yarn that are destined to be a beautiful pair of socks.  I want to knit them toe up so that I can use every inch of the cashmere.

I will take your advice and keep trying.  I have just decided (thanks to your suggestion) to save my lovely cashmere until I have mastered the toe up method.

If anyone else has suggestions/tips/advice, I'd still love to hear from you!

Thanks Fozziebear!

Karynlibrarian
THIS ROCKS   Logged

aliastriona_angerboda
Pirate Queen, Insane Woman, Complete Nerd
Offline Offline

Posts: 2070
Joined: 12-Jan-2006


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2006 05:07:04 PM »

Toe-ups are what I like, as all my attempts at cuff-down turn out wonky.

I use the Cybersocks tutorial.  It's a whole series of lessons, with the main page found here:
http://www.socknitters.com/toe-up/

Good luck with it, and I must say...Cashmere socks?  I'm jealous...
THIS ROCKS   Logged

subloke
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2006 05:51:31 PM »

For the first pair of socks I knit using the toe-up method I used the directions found here.  I originally tried with sock yarn and (what seemed at the time) teeny needles but got frustrated quickly.  I decided to try with chunky yarn and size US10/6mm needles.  I found it much easier to see what I was doing with the wraps etc. and it was a relatively quick knit.  I found it much easier to see what i was doing then when I worked my way to smaller needles and yarn. 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

if you can't be a good example then you'll just have to be a horrible warning.

http://yesimadethat.blogspot.com
m*babylon
Offline Offline

Posts: 271
Joined: 10-Jun-2005

you can't get there from here


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2006 11:57:54 AM »

This Knitty article gives a couple of variations of toes for a toe-up sock.

for those of you who like that article and use the figure 8 method...what method do you use to M1 (make 1) at the beginning or end of each needle, as called for in the pattern?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

just a city boy, born & raised in south detroit
he took the midnight train going anywhere...
m*babylon
Offline Offline

Posts: 271
Joined: 10-Jun-2005

you can't get there from here


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2006 11:06:24 AM »

seriously none of you fantastically intelligent craftst-y sock knitter folks know?  i find that hard to believe. ;]

hopefully someone can answer in this thread so that i don't have to clutter up the craftster board with duplicate threads.

thanks!  Grin
a*
THIS ROCKS   Logged

just a city boy, born & raised in south detroit
he took the midnight train going anywhere...
Fozziebear54
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2006 11:25:57 AM »

I don't like the figure 8 toe much (the first couple of rows are too weird for me to knit), but I've tried doing it a couple of times. When you get to the part of the toe where you increase one stitch from the end of a needle (Needle 1: Knit until the last stitch, M1, K1. Needle 2: Knit 1, M1, knit to the end. Needle 3: Knit until the last stitch, M1, K1. Needle 4: Knit 1, M1, knit to the end), I increase by lifting up the bar in betwetween stitches and knitting into that. For the first set of increases, I just knit into the side of a stitch that wasn't on the needle... which probably isn't the best way to go about it, but it works.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

aliastriona_angerboda
Pirate Queen, Insane Woman, Complete Nerd
Offline Offline

Posts: 2070
Joined: 12-Jan-2006


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2006 11:31:46 AM »

I've never done a figure-eight toe, but for my toe-up increases I use yarn-overs...just knit in the back of each one to twist them shut when you reach them on the next round.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

m*babylon
Offline Offline

Posts: 271
Joined: 10-Jun-2005

you can't get there from here


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2006 11:43:15 AM »

thanks for the responses.  i'll give it a go and see what happens.  the biggest part i'm confused about is this:

Begin knitting circularly.  Round 1: Make 1 stitch at the beginning of the round, knit 4.

i'm not sure i get how i m1 at the beginning of a round that isn't in the round yet, but i should probably just try it and see.  It would make much more sense if I was suppsed to knit a stitch first.

i've got oodles of fantastic sock yarn (lorna's, vesper, sunshine) and *still* haven't knit socks yet!  part of the problem is i have tiny feet (size 6-6.5M) and i hate baggy droopy socks.  most of the patterns out there seem written for size 8 or larger.  (although I hear the jaywalkers are a little more snug than most)  the couple attempts i made at top down got ripped out before they were finished for being too droopy, plus i like the diagonal heel rather than that heel-flap-thingy.

THIS ROCKS   Logged

just a city boy, born & raised in south detroit
he took the midnight train going anywhere...
TheDishclothQueen
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2006 12:06:00 PM »

thanks for the responses.  i'll give it a go and see what happens.  the biggest part i'm confused about is this:

Begin knitting circularly.  Round 1: Make 1 stitch at the beginning of the round, knit 4.

i'm not sure i get how i m1 at the beginning of a round that isn't in the round yet, but i should probably just try it and see.  It would make much more sense if I was suppsed to knit a stitch first.

i've got oodles of fantastic sock yarn (lorna's, vesper, sunshine) and *still* haven't knit socks yet!  part of the problem is i have tiny feet (size 6-6.5M) and i hate baggy droopy socks.  most of the patterns out there seem written for size 8 or larger.  (although I hear the jaywalkers are a little more snug than most)  the couple attempts i made at top down got ripped out before they were finished for being too droopy, plus i like the diagonal heel rather than that heel-flap-thingy.


If it makes it easier for you, knit a stitch first, then do your M1.  I have a hard time believing that it's going to make a huge difference in the broad scheme of the sock.  If, by some bizarre twist of fate, it doesn't work, then just knit into the front and back of the first stitch.  It's probably not the M1 they want, but again, in the broad scheme of things, it's not going to make a huge difference.  Once you get it figured out and understand the basic concept, then you either rip it out and do it the "right" way or just do it the "right" way on your next pair of socks.

As for your feet....I have the same problem.  I wear a size 7-8, which I guess is normal, but I hate droopy socks.  I prefer my socks to be knit on 56-60 sts.  For most patterns, you can take out one or two pattern repeats and make it work.  (And on the other hand, there's some patterns that it just won't work on.  I tell myself that those patterns are ugly anyway.)

Good luck!

PS-->  The "diagonal" heel that prefer is a short-row heel.  Which means you're going to have to come to terms with those short-rows one way or another!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Making an effort to use proper English and not 'net slang makes me much more willing to respond to your post.
m*babylon
Offline Offline

Posts: 271
Joined: 10-Jun-2005

you can't get there from here


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2006 12:17:18 PM »

PS-->  The "diagonal" heel that prefer is a short-row heel.  Which means you're going to have to come to terms with those short-rows one way or another!

thanks!  i'm probably just over-thinking it.  i've often found if i just suck it up and try it, it usually works out just fine, i'm just nervous about casting on AGAIN for a sock and having it come out wrong.   and i *adore* short rows!  the first time i tried it (on fiber trends felted clogs) i thought it was the coolest thing since computers! (sliced bread has been a little overrated for a while now ;])  what i don't like is that flat slip-stitch heel flap.  it looks boxy and weird to me.  the short row heel looks more streamlined.

thanks again everyone!  i'll let you know if i run into any problems.
a*
THIS ROCKS   Logged

just a city boy, born & raised in south detroit
he took the midnight train going anywhere...
Threads you might like:
Pages: 1 2 [All] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Make a Long-Lasting Blowout
How to Create Volume With a Haircut
The Best Haircut for Square Shaped Faces
The Best Haircut for Rounder Faces
How to Get the Right Bangs for Your Face Shape
Latest Blog Articles
April 17, 2015 Featured Projects
@Home This Weekend: Upcycled Mini-Cabinet
Laundry Day!

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2015, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.