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Topic: Wilton Dye Ratios  (Read 11422 times)
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autumnelayne
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« on: June 21, 2006 06:13:05 PM »

I'm all ready to dye roving for the first time! I have been searching around online looking at different techniques and would like to try the Wilton Cake Dyes. Problem is I can't seem to find any exact measurements or some sort of base recipe for this. I know you use vinegar like with Kool-aid but that's it, I would think the ratios might be different. Also if anyone has any tips for getting the best results with any particular colors I'd love to hear those as well...Thanks!
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knitwit
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« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2006 08:17:11 PM »

I haven't seen exact measurements either but I decided to just wing it and see what I liked. It also depends on what kind of results you want - pale colors or saturated colors. It seems like it depends on the dye too. Some colors require more dye. I know I'm not helping much here so I'll try to be specific. I usually take a popsicle stick and scoop out a bit on the end - maybe a little less than a pea size at the most. I mix that into a cup of hot water with a glub of lemon juice. (It smells nicer than vinegar) - sometimes I water this down further. A little goes a long way. The colors are more saturated than kool-aid. I have been happy with the results and still get a few surprises along the way!

Another thing I noticed about the colors - if you drizzle water over the roving or yarn while it sits in the pot, the water removes some of the color and you get different colors. For example with copper you get pink. And delphinium blue gives you purple.

I hope more people post ideas for this too since I like using this dye!
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autumnelayne
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2006 07:09:56 PM »

I'm taking matters into my own hands! Observe:

The Wilton Dye Trials: Scientific Method + Craftiness Parts 1 and 2

EDIT: Link has been updated to my new blog server!
« Last Edit: January 04, 2007 11:26:03 PM by autumnelayne » THIS ROCKS   Logged

bitibis
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2006 10:46:28 PM »

Nice trial.  I didn't realize that they separated until after I had my fiber in the pot.  I usually soak my fiber in the dye and then add vinegar because some random tutorial told me too.  And then the colors that separate (royal blue and black for me) give me a nice splotchy, variegated hank of fiber that I spin up.  I imagine some people want a solid color, but I like the way it spins up. 

My questions with Wilton involve whether they are lightfast or not.  I think my one batch faded just because I didn't wash all of the vinegar out, and vinegar+sun=fading, right?

I'm a big fan of winging it, too.  And usually start with 1/8 tsp.  I've also had good luck with mixing colors-royal blue and yellow made an awesome forest green, and royal blue and pink made a nice purple with splotches of pink.  I also made a hideous salmon color with pink and yellow...
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AgentAlmost
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« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2006 07:15:57 AM »

Hi, I just thought I'd pop my head in here and make things even more difficult.

the food coloring red 3 is not soluble below 6 ph and alot of wilton colors include red 3. What this means is when the vinegar is added to the dye bath, the red stops being soluble and either sticks to the dye pot, sticks to the yarn, or floats near the bottom in globules. the red will stick to the wool fiber but it hasn't exactly dyed it, it will wash out and even rub off. Both royal blue and black contain red 3 and the reason why the colors seperated when the vinegar was added was because the ph of the dye bath went below 6.

Bitibis, what color were you using that faded and how did it fade?
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autumnelayne
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2006 02:21:50 PM »

Very Intaaaresting!  So, I am thinking of pitching the reds/pinks and trying kool-aid for those colors instead Smiley
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AgentAlmost
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« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2006 04:30:06 AM »

Kool aid is quite expensive when you add it up and there's no need to use it since wilton's no taste red is all red 40 which works absolutely fine. I use wilton's dyes myself but you just have to read the ingredients keeping a look out for red 3 and mentally subtracting the color from any of the dye colors to get an idea of what the finished color would look like with the red 3 washed out of it: for example violet is blue and christmas red is orange (fyi: yellow 6 is actually orangish in color not yellow, its yellow 5 that's actually yellow).
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bitibis
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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2006 12:00:25 PM »

They were pinks and purples that faded, but I think the red 3 may explain that phenomenon.  Maybe I just rinsed it out right before I hung it out to dry.  Thanks for the tip!  I'll read the labels more closely now.
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meilynne
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« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2006 07:18:22 PM »

I am double posting here, because this info might be helpful to roving dyers as well....

After many frustrations with hot pink pots, spoons, wash water, and eventually fading pink yarn, I finally figured out how to dye with that tricky red #3 - a beautiful bright watermelon pink that also makes the violet lovely as well.

It's all because red #3 dyes at a lower acidity than the rest of the colors, so here's how I did it....

I added a washed & soaked skein of Paton's Classic Merino to a 4 qt. pot filled with 3 qts. of cool water w/ 1 tsp of Wilton's violet (red #3 & blue #1) dissolved in it. Hint: Wilton dissolves faster in a little hot water, then add to the dyepot.

I started with 2 tbsp of vinegar, and heated to almost boiling, then turned it down to the lowest temp, just below simmer. I let that sit for about 30 minutes, then the water turned blue as the red absorbed, but the blue didn't. Then every 20 minutes or so, I added 2 more tbsp of vinegar, until I was up to 10 tbsp, when the water finally turned clear as the blue completely absorbed.

I let the whole thing cool overnight in the pot - I hear that makes the dye set better. I washed and rinsed the whole thing the next morning, and though the yarn was slightly varigated with different hues of purple, not a speck of pink residue was left behind.

HTH,
Mei in AR

« Last Edit: May 22, 2012 06:24:43 AM by Belladune » THIS ROCKS   Logged

misshawklet
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« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2006 05:46:45 PM »

wow, that is some purple!!

I have recently started experimenting with wilton and I love the dyes!  I only have three colors right now, so I need more, but...

I usually add vinegar right to the dyebath before I add the wool.  It seems to work pretty well.  And actually I started using citric acid.  It works just as well, you can buy it cheap from dharma (or probably locally too) and it takes up WAY less space as I was buying those huge things of vinegar and have a tiny apartment.  And you only use a little citric acid.  Plus I do belive its food safe since its a pretty common preservative.

I've found that wilton takes really well, and the colors are SO vibrant!  I never measure though, I have never measured any dye.  I just wing it too.
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