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Topic: COLOR sampler (primaries)  (Read 5166 times)
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« on: June 16, 2006 01:43:56 PM »

COLOR sampler
for much more info on mixing polymer colors, look here:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/color.htm



(each horizontal row shows the range of mixtures created by
mixing the color in its left column with the color in its right column)

This sampler of polymer clay color chips was created by my guild to show just 4 simple combinations of colors that can be created by mixing only the 6 "primaries" of Premo with each other, two at a time (those are the colors the ends of each row).
 
Premo actually has a warm and cool version of each of their red, blue and yellow primaries (for a total of 6):
...Cobalt (warm blue)...Ultramarine (cool blue)
...Cadmium Red (warm red)... Alizarin Crimson (cool red)
...Cadmium Yellow (warm yellow)... Zinc Yellow (cool yellow)
(Most other brands have only one version of their purest version of red, blue, and yellow.)

A lot of the true color variations can't be seen from the photo (especially in the darker colors), but at least it gives a general idea of what can happen when just a few colors of clay are mixed!

Keep in mind though that only a few of the polymer colors that can be purchased were used for this sampler, so there could be many more simple combinations --including for example, each of these colors with a secondary color (turquoise, green, purple), etc., or even these colors with a metallic colored clay or with translucent clay.

Also, each of these colors (or any other clay color) could be further changed into many-many other colors by adding white (to create a series of "tints"), adding black (to create a series of "shades"), or adding gray, brown, or the complement of the color (to create a series of "tones").  
The combinations possible are limited only by what the eye can discern and which colors one uses.... kinda overwhelming actually.


OTHER WAYS to create various colors of raw polymer clay yourself have to do with mixing other things besides clay into the clay (...usually white or translucent clay is used as the base).

The two main colorants are oil paints and alcohol inks like Pinata and Ranger (for inks, apply to clay sheet, then let alcohol evaporate off before mixing color in).
You can use acrylic paints too, but since those contain water (which can expand during heating and cause bubbles, etc.), you wouldn't want to use much acrylic paint in a specific bit of raw clay (...or just leave the colored clay out overnight before baking to let most of the water evaporate out of the clay).

Many other colorants can be used to give a solid color or a speckled color, to the body of raw clay:
...ground spices, dry pigments, and dry tempera, fabric dyes, concentrated tea, crayon shavings, and metallic powders... as well as embossing powders, play sands, some glitters, herbs, even dirt, etc.
(those are generally mixed into translucent clay, or into translucents which have been tinted with color, so they'll show up some distance "into" the clay after baking as well as on the surface ...then they're often called "inclusions", and some inclusions in translucent clay can look especially amazing if they're sanded and buffed or given a glossy sealer too).


LESSONS & RECIPES for mixing whole palettes of color (from just a 3 primaries plus black and white) as well as mixing many interesting individual colors can be found on the page linked to at top.


Have fun!




Diane B.

GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia"
« Last Edit: August 05, 2011 01:31:23 PM by jungrrl - Reason: edited to comply with Craftster guidelines » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
tooaquarius
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2006 09:14:05 PM »

Hey Diane!

I'm not sure if it filtered down to Glassattic yet but I did a few colour wheels, same basis, with Premo! based primaries.

The charts for the results can be found here:

http://www.tooaquarius.com/learn/colours/premo-cobalt-blue-cadmium-red-cadmium-yellow/

http://www.tooaquarius.com/learn/colours/premo-turquoise-fuschia-zinc-yellow/

http://www.tooaquarius.com/learn/colours/premo-ultramarine-blue-alizarin-crimson-cadmium-yellow/
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My Etsy Shop - http://claychicks.etsy.com
My Polymer Clay Art - http://www.tooaquarius.com
Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2006 10:41:18 AM »

Quote

No, I hadn't seen those before (and I'll add them to GA), but I'm a little confused by the charts and what each segment represents (though those charts really do show a lot of the color variation that's possible!).

First, I'm confused because you don't seem to be starting with true-color representations of the clay primaries (on my screen anyway), maybe it's different for other systems or browsers?.  They all look as if they've been tinted or toned down before even beginning the mixes... except for the cadmium yellow).

Also, since you're mxing colors of light rather than colors of pigment like clay or paint, doesn't that change what happens in the mixes since you're doing it in a computer? 
Or did you somehow substitute the primaries of light (red, blue, green) first to get representations of the pigment primaries?  (This is hard to explain, just want to understand how to use the chart!)

As for the rows under the gradient, just tell me if this is right:

...the first row is supposed to be individual colors found along that gradient (individual "hues"), each of which has a ratio printed in it to show the proportions of the two primaries mixed. The individual hues don't look the same as the same area of the gradient though, so I want to be sure that's just the way it came out becuase it was on a screen, and not something I'm just not getting)

...the other 5 rows seem to be:
.....adding white to each color in the row to make a tint
.....adding gray to each color in the row to make a tone
.....adding black to each color in the row to make a shade
.....adding translucent to each color in the row to make a tinted translucent
.....adding ecru to each color in the row to make a tone

Is that right?... or is there anything else I need to understand??





Diane B.

GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia"
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm


 

« Last Edit: June 17, 2006 10:46:32 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Diane B.
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Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2006 10:42:49 AM »

Oh, I forgot to add a couple of other photos that I'd put in another thread showing much larger balls of clay instead of chips.

They show 4 entire color palettes, each made with only 3 primary colors.
  
The number of colors mixed wasn't huge (seccondaries and tertiarties plus a few more, and also a few "tones"), but of course zillions more colors would be possible for each palette.

In this first photo, at the corner of each work surface you can see just which 3 color combo (red+blue+yellow,  or turquoise+magenta+lemon) was used to produce each entire palette:
http://www.pbase.com/image/1050187

This photo shows a fuller color "wheel," with a few mixes made across the wheel added:
http://www.pbase.com/image/1050191





Diane B.

GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia"
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
« Last Edit: June 17, 2006 10:44:48 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
bird nerd
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2006 11:56:27 PM »

Great resource, thank you! Smiley
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dutchclassic
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2006 05:43:32 PM »

This is great. I'm a painter, and I'm just getting into polymer. I hadn't realized you could mix them....
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Subversive
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2006 12:49:47 PM »

This is good stuff, Diane.  I'm fascinated with custom color mixing.  The guild I belong to did a "color swap" program a couple of years ago that is still the most fun I've ever had at a meeting - the woman who coordinated it spent a lot of prep time cutting up blocks of clay & portioning it out for specific recipes (using only Premo cobalt, ultramarine, fuschia, cad yellow, and white - we were just doing "cool colors" this time) and then at the meeting she distributed them in Ziplock bags -- we then mixed, rolled out, cut into 1" squares and marked with the recipe number - and everyone got to run around and collect a square of each color from everyone else.  (It was something like a combination scavenger hunt and game of Pit, with everyone calling out the numbers they were missing.)  There were a total of I think 50-some color formulas, and once baked I have the squares stored in a binder in the kind of plastic sheet protector they make for photographic slides, along with the sheet of formulas numbered to match.

Maggie Maggio is supposed to do a color workshop for us this fall - I can't wait! ! ! !

Dutchclassic, I think Premo was specifically created for a "painterly" approach to color.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2006 12:51:57 PM by Subversive » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Capultum habeo.  Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis ad caput tuum saxem mittam.  (Translation:  I have a catapult.  Give me all your money or Ill fling enormous rocks at your head.)
Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2006 01:10:12 PM »

Quote
the most fun I've ever had at a meeting - the woman who coordinated it spent a lot of prep time cutting up blocks of clay & portioning it out for specific recipes ...we then mixed, rolled out, cut into 1" squares and marked with the recipe number - and everyone got to run around and collect a square of each color from everyone else. . .
 

Great way to do it!!!!  That goes a whole lot faster than each person making each of their own individual mixes, though I know a lot of people who've done it.

Quote
Maggie Maggio is supposed to do a color workshop for us this fall - I can't wait! ! ! !

I'm sure it will be great!  Those photos I linked to were taken at the second class that Margaret gave to our guild, but the class I went to had been the first one (she actually gave that one with Laura Liska).  I have some photos somewhere of one of the exercises they gave us to do to explore our preferred "color palettes", etc.  They had brought a load of  paper squares, embroidery thread hanks, colored pencils, beads, color chips from house paint samples, and other things in a huge range of colors which they laid out on our tables... our job was to pick out color schemes we liked from all those items. Then (surprise!) we had to mix all the colors we'd picked out, with polymer clay.... cool!  I was pretty surprised to find it wasn't that hard to do.

I'm not sure what all Margaret does in her color classes now, but whatever, it's bound to be great --and very provocative for later work!



Diane B.
GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia" http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
little bit'o photosharing: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/dianeatglassattic/my_photos



« Last Edit: July 14, 2006 02:59:24 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Diane B.
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Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2006 03:01:23 PM »

.
Okay... I found some of the photos from that color exercise class.  Here are most of the color choices laid out on the tables (there were a lot more "tones" there than really show up in the photo though):  



This was one of my color palette choices (we were supposed to pick at least 5 colors... I hadn't decided which I'd want to remove when I took the photo but I thought I had too many)  




Another of my palettes... I was obviously in a particular color mood that day!





Diane B.
GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia" http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm

« Last Edit: January 21, 2010 09:03:43 AM by rackycoo - Reason: to fix images » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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