A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Joining an Organized Swap? Please review the rules and info on a regular basis.
Total Members: 300,900
Currently Running With Scissors:
485 Guests and 8 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop

  Show Posts
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7]
61  PAPER CRAFTS, SCRAPBOOKING & ATCs (ARTIST TRADING CARDS) / Paper Crafts: Completed Projects: Reconstructed / Re: cd notebook on: June 05, 2004 08:00:35 PM
I haven't gotten far enough in the planning stages to figure out cutting holes in the center of the paper.  I'm getting ready to leave the country for a month, so all of my craft ideas have been put on hold until I get back.  I don't have a lot of tools and such, so I'd probably end up tracing the holes from the cds and just folding and cutting.  I wonder if they have any big hole punches out there, though.  That would be something worth looking into. 
62  NEWS AND DISCUSSION ABOUT CRAFTSTER / Craftster Itself / Re: craftster.org crafting book? on: June 02, 2004 09:38:37 PM
I know this thread is old, but everyone seemed so passionate about the idea that I thought I'd offer my two cents and help prod you guys along.  I currently work for a literary agent, so here's my advice:

Someone has to draft a book proposal, preferably with a sample, and then submit it to a literary agent or publisher.  You have to have a very clear and well-written letter to even spark remote interest- which most people fail.  You also need a good sample of what the book will be like otherwise your submission will likely be rejected as soon as their interns or whatever slaves they have employed open the envelope and figure out who to address the rejection form letter to. 

Most importantly, you have to do a lot of research in finding what agent/publisher is interested in publishing a craft book. This gets sticky because in the realm of craft publishers, you need to figure out what exact type of crafting book they're looking for at the time. Often, publishers aren't interested in certain areas and they won't even consider something that doesn't conform to what they want to focus on.  To make things harder, I understand that there aren't a wide variety of craft publishing houses.  My guess is that they're all trying to figure out how to tap into the Stitch 'n Bitch market right now, which is both good and bad.  Good because people are taking the idea of publishing a craft book more seriously than in the recent past, but bad because publishing houses are most likely tapping into the knitting market rather than the general crafting market right now.

Also, it helps to get your foot in the door by meeting an agent or publisher who would be interested in representing a craft book.  If you actually meet someone, they give you a better chance than if you just sent them a letter in the mail.  Don't look at me, though- the agent I work for deals only in "literary fiction and non-fiction narratives".  I think it's highly unliikely, but I'll ask her if she knows anyone in the craft publishing business.  I'm too busy to help actualize the grand scale of this project other than offering more advice on agent/publisher queries.
63  PAPER CRAFTS, SCRAPBOOKING & ATCs (ARTIST TRADING CARDS) / Paper Crafts: Completed Projects: Reconstructed / Re: cd notebook on: June 02, 2004 08:35:01 PM
I had recently been thinking about a similar idea.  I was going to cut two holes into two different cds, sandwich circular paper between them and bind everything together with metal rings. I was thinking of either using the book as a mini photo album or having blank pages for friends to write and doodle on when they came over to visit. 

Another idea I had was that you could cut holes in the center of all of the pages so if you had a ton of them you could decorate a cd spool and keep them stacked on the coffee table.  Or, you could hang strings with hooks on the end from the ceiling to hang the booklets as a form of artwork- which could also be taken down and flipped through.
64  HOME SWEET HOME / Exterior Decorating / Yard Art / Gardening: Completed Projects / Re: The "Nice to Grow You" Upside down planter on: June 02, 2004 08:22:05 PM
That's an interesting idea.  I would have never thought of it.

There are tomato varieties out there (Patio King is one I know off-hand) that grow really well in containers.  I grew a 4th of July in the ground last year and it got quite big, so I'm not sure how yours will do.  If it doesn't work out, look around for tomatoes that grow in containers.  I think I've seen mention of some out there that will grow in a hanging basket.

I also highly recommend checking out the book "The Bountiful Container Garden" to anyone with limited space who wants to grow veggies in containers.  Before I got a P-Patch (a city-owned plot of land one pays a small yearly fee for), I tried growing just about any veggie imaginable on a small porch.  I worshiped this book- and still do.
65  Washington / Washington: West / Re: in search of: fabric/ribbon stores in seattle! on: May 29, 2004 04:58:22 PM
I went to Stiches the other day.  They don't have the grosgrain fabric that you're looking for, but they have a decent amount of basic ribbons and buttons and a few other findings.  It's a very small store and everything in there was really high quality but didn't seem too pricey.  Their fabrics were absolutely beautiful, and I recommend going there if you want to splurge on something pretty.  They are not, however, the type of place you go to for basic or quilting fabric even though they do have some lining materials and batting.

I bought some really beautiful reversible silks there that I'm going to make into handbags.  My fingers are twitching in anticipation just thinking about it...
66  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Discussion and Questions / Re: Cutting/drilling CDs? on: May 27, 2004 08:53:10 AM
Wow, that sounds really cool.  Using funky ribbon or thick yarn to sticth the CDs and felt together might give it a really interesting dimension.

I think drilling would probably be the way to go if you can find someone with a suitable drill.  Poking through the CD might distort the hole so that it scratches and distresses any lining.  Though you could probably sand it down. 

You might be able to use a sodering iron or wood burner if you have one of those laying around. Or even a hot glue gun.  I would probably wrap a tiny square of tin foil around the tip of any of those first, just in case.  Of course, all of the above would end up giving you really big holes.

Please post pictures if you complete the purse.  I really want to see it!
67  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Discussion and Questions / Re: Cutting/drilling CDs? on: May 27, 2004 12:09:59 AM
I want to turn some CDs into a sculpture and have been idly puzzling over this for a couple of years now.  I think if you use a diamond tip dremel it would work.  I'm haven't gotten my hands on one yet, so I don't know for sure. 

Maybe you could also heat up some sharp piece of metal and poke it through.  I've learned that CDs melt pretty easily, though you'd want to do it outside because they smell terrible and I think they're very toxic when melted.
68  REUSING/RECYCLING/RECRAFTING / What the heck can I do with THIS? / Re: empty film canisters!!!??? on: May 26, 2004 11:45:57 PM
When I was in elementary school, our school nurse had us make them into mini first-aid kits.  We put in a couple of q-tips, something or another to use as a finger splint, some various band aids, a tiny amount of small medical tape, and one antiseptic wipe. 

I never used it as a kid, but would always empty it and stare at its contents in fascination. I think it would be cool to throw in a purse or bag as loose band aids are always so hard to find.
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7]


FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Hair Color Tips
How to Curl Your Hair With a Flat Iron
How to Flat Iron Your Hair
How to Choose a Flat Iron
How to Maintain Your Flat Iron and Hair
Latest Blog Articles
Handmade Gift Ideas: Wooden Chain
Handmade Gift Ideas: Upcycled Car Trash Bag
Tute Tuesday: Honkin' Big Beach Ball Snowman

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.