A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Need help? Click the HELP link at the top of the screen to read the docs or ask at the Help Desk.
Total Members: 302,542
Currently Running With Scissors:
648 Guests and 21 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop

  Show Posts
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 17
11  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Knitted Dress Patterns? on: December 15, 2005 09:21:32 AM
Maybe it's just me, but I'd run far away from any (hand) knitted dress.

Hand knitting yarn is just generally kind of bulky, unless you're knitting with fingering weight, so in my head, knitted dresses would by default make anyone look bigger than they already are.

Also, wouldn't that be incredibly heavy? I'd imagine ending up with something with an unflattering drape to it -- something that by the end of the day, would droop significantly because of the weight of the yarn itself.
12  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Adriafil Gaia skirt and top, help needed! (from an Italian maybe ) on: December 15, 2005 09:16:41 AM
1) European needle sizes are often just numbered as the mm sizing. It's the same was in German and French patterns, a number 3 needle is a 3mm needle, and No. 4,5 would be a 4.5mm needle.

2) Since it says "increasing at the ends" (note the s on ends), I'd start the row, knit 3 stitches, increase, knit the rest of the pattern until the last 3 stitches, increase and knit the last 3 stitches. So you're increasing on BOTH edges every other row.

3) I'm also pretty sure that Adriafil gives only one schematic for the front/back pieces, though I haven't looked at a pattern in a while. If the picture shows that the bottom edge of the garment is say, 40cm, it means that when lying flat the garment is 40cm wide, so the total circumference would be ~80cm (+/- whatever the stretch the knitted fabric might have).
13  COOKING / Recipes and Cooking Tips / Re: Question about mixing on: December 12, 2005 01:44:56 PM
Sure.
Though the blender might incorporate lots of air into the filling so it will be less dense than if you mix it up by hand.
14  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: binding off without breaking the yarn on: December 12, 2005 01:35:29 PM
I don't own the book, but it sounds similar to building a pouch with a flat bottom.
You bind off the stitches so that your cast off edge matches the cast on edge (and it gives it stability), then you use the yarn still attached to the bottom piece (at the bind off edge) to pick up stitches all around it. Then you typically continue knitting in the round, around all the sides of the bottom.

15  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Raglan Sweater with a Twist on: December 12, 2005 01:32:05 PM
I've thought long and hard about this.

You want to end up with a typical raglan shaping of arm pieces/front/back, but on the seam that should be buttoned up, you pick up and knit button bands for about a centimetre or so between the front/arm seam.

Not exactly sure if the extra space would alter the fitting of it too much...
But then again, I've seen many of these sweaters on people, where the buttons aren't exactly functional -- just sewn on top of the seam
16  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: KNitting myself clothing... and trying to lose weight... on: December 10, 2005 08:40:12 PM
I'd honestly go for something inbetween.

Knit something that might end up fitting snugly now, and then, when you do lose weight, you'll have more of a "comfy sweater" thing going on.
17  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Pattern Question - cables on: December 10, 2005 08:39:16 PM
I assume the pattern only has 2 rows written out..

So here's what you do.
(row1, row2) 3 times to get 6 rows.
next row WOULD be row 1, but instead cable.
Continue with row2.

So it ends up being
1,2,1,2,1,2,cable,2,1,2,1,2,cable,2,1,2,1,2,cable...

18  PAPER CRAFTS, SCRAPBOOKING & ATCs (ARTIST TRADING CARDS) / Paper Crafts: Discussion and Questions / Re: What's wrong with my journal? on: December 03, 2005 08:57:30 PM
Your mom is mostly right.
If you're using the first/last page or your signature block as the endpapers, they will not reach the edges of the covers.

Lay the cover flat, and stand the textblock on it where it'll end up (so spine of the block on the spine of the cover). Then fold down the first and last page, mark where those reach on the covers -- that is where you want to glue your front/last page down. If you pull them all the way to the edge of the inside covers, the pages may tear if you try to open the book flat.

It's easier if you use endpages that are at least twice as long as your pages are wide... then they can reach all the way to the edge of the inside covers.

I hope that made sense, if not, just experiment with how you place your textblock onto the cover.

Also, try reading some of the posts at http://www.livejournal.com/community/handmadebooks/
they often have helpful posts or links to tutorials.
19  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: what is double knitting yarn? on: November 07, 2005 04:49:42 PM
It normally knits up to a range of about 20-24 sts/4"
20  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Abbreviation problems... on: August 24, 2005 02:04:00 PM
It's a way of making a stitch.

you pick up the "bar" of yarn between two stitches in the row below, twist it and knit it.
http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/basic_techniques/increase.php
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 17


only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
CoolAge Blogfest Winners at Spring Fest, IIT Kharagpur
Jerry Stahl LIVE
All Fishermen Are Liars by John Gierach
A Chat with the Best Selling Author Preeti Shenoy
How to Teach Toddlers to Trust Themselves
Latest Blog Articles
DIY Summer
Craft Challenge 101 Announced - Stash Buster
July 8, 2014 Featured Projects

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.