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21  COOKING / Recipes and Cooking Tips / Re: Help! I have a "meat eater" hubby! on: July 20, 2011 10:42:35 PM
Honestly? I'd keep making things he doesn't like that I do. That's what I do with my somewhat picky husband. He'll usually try everything at least once, and sometimes he surprises himself by liking something he thought he didn't like, so there's sometimes a win in there. But when he doesn't, he'll eat what I've made for him and I'll eat what I've made for me.

Edited to add:

Sometimes, it isn't that he doesn't like something. It's that he doesn't like how he's had it before. But if I prepare it in a new way, he'll try it, and sometimes he'll like it.

Like pumpkin. The husband doesn't like pumpkin. But he loves cumin & pepper pumpkin soup. He thought he hated cream cheese icing, but he loves it the way I make it. He hates eggplant, but likes it a certain Middle Eastern way. Sometimes, it's about making it in a new-for-him way and getting him to try it.
22  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Re: New to sewing...question on finishing stitches :) on: June 28, 2011 07:39:07 PM
Do you reverse stitch at the beginning and when you come to the end?

i do that too. i just taught myself how to use a sewing machine and it seemed like the best idea i could think of.
Yep, it works very well. So well, in fact, that my sister and I joke about cursing out the stupid obsessed woman who backstitches so effectively that our seam ripping takes forever. Tongue
23  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / Re: Henna hair dye? on: June 01, 2011 10:45:38 PM
If you need help deciding how to do your henna for whatever colours/shades you're looking at, the first resource you need to check out is the link for henna4hair listed above. It's an EXCELLENT site with a LOT of useful information, including a ton of recipes contributed by everyday henna users and before/after pics.

Personally, I've been using henna brought from Dubai by my sister in law for the last bunch of years when I lived in Sri Lanka. Now that I'm in Auckland, I'll be using whatever the Indian shops have - I've already checked 'em out, and they carry pure henna, so it's no problem.
24  COOKING / Recipes and Cooking Tips / Re: Prevent worms in flour? on: May 28, 2011 02:45:35 PM
Yup. It can work on pretty much anything.

ETA: Yeah, I should be more specific. There are limitations. Meat, for example, can still breed worms after it's taken out of the freezer. Bacteria survives freezing. Molds can survive freezing. It's not a foolproof way of killing absolutely everything bad. But yes, it can help with a lot of things.
25  COOKING / Recipes and Cooking Tips / Re: Prevent worms in flour? on: May 26, 2011 07:22:57 PM
Yeah, worms in flour are nasty. Had to throw a bag out once it was so bad.

Since you mention you don't have room in your freezer for the whole lot, can you put portions into a zip lock bag, freeze for three days or so, then store it in an airtight container? Freezing the flour for a few days is supposed to kill any eggs or insects that are already there, thus preventing an outbreak.
26  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Re: Traumatic sewing accident in my class today on: May 26, 2011 07:19:36 PM
I did that, a few months ago.  Poor girl!  I know that I had to take a course of antibiotics to prevent infection and had an xray done to make sure it didn't break the tip of my fingerbone (I don't know what it's actually called) off.   
Huh. Getting an xray or taking antibiotics hadn't even occured to me. I didn't even see a doc about it. Ran the finger under water to make sure the blood drained out, wiped with clean cloth, then applied a bandaid.
27  CRAFTY BUSINESS ADVICE / Crafty Business Discussion / Re: Advice wanted for spring photoshoot on: May 17, 2011 10:50:17 PM
The only way to make the clothes look good is to have them worn by someone they fit, and that's you.

Since you've hired a photographer, I'm hoping s/he's a professional with a good deal of experience in this area. If so, honestly, I would ask him for advice on how you can maximize how the photoshoot comes out. He should have all sorts of tips and tricks and, if he's any good, he'll be able to do some amount of magic in how he shoots and in post processing.

I'd also consider hiring a hair/makeup artist for the shoot. You'd be amazed at what they can do.

Also, I don't know what makes you particularly awful to have your picture taken. It could just be awkwardness on your side. If that's what it is, it's entirely possible that the right photographer can change that. I'm am amateur photographer, but I've taken some mighty good pictures of people who thought they weren't at all photogenic. It's really about making them feel comfortable and relaxed.

Good luck!
28  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Re: New to sewing...question on finishing stitches :) on: May 13, 2011 09:45:50 PM
If you're REALLY careful, and don't want the threads to come undone, you can always lightly heat them together using a lighter- but I only recommend it on dark fabrics because of the burned thread being black/light brown.

That would only work on thread that's synthetic, like polyester - synthetic thread and fabric melt. Organic thread and fabrics - like cotton, wool, silk, rayon, bamboo - will burn instead.
29  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / Re: Mineral powder makeup - cheap sources for the exact same ingredients on: May 07, 2011 07:41:25 PM
A comment about rice flour - food grade rice flour is fairly gritty and not near as fine as rice flour that I've seen used in cosmetics.
30  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Re: beaded Sari (Saree) fabric - can you machine sew it? on: April 23, 2011 04:54:59 PM
I should mention that, when shalwaar fabric (you can buy kits that include the fabric for a blouse, pants, and shawl) is beaded, the beading usually forms a specific pattern that allows for sewing in non-beaded areas, so it's less painful to work with than what you're dealing with. The patterns will usually form a neckline area or the beading will be for sleeves or for the body of the shalwaar, but there are specific boundaries/shapes to the beading that clearly indicate where it's to be used, if that makes sense.
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