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3721  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Don't understand "dec 1 st." Help! Thanks! on: March 19, 2006 04:17:36 AM
I agree, you only decrease at each end of those rows. Looking at the diagram, they're there for shaping. Or you could skip the decreases and make the sides straight.

sue
3722  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Good ideas for fingering-weight yarn scraps? on: March 16, 2006 01:12:41 PM
I just discovered an online magazine the other day which has a pattern for a capelet made from yarn leftovers. Check it out here...
http://www.spunmag.com/article/050410sbcapelet

sue
3723  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Help! I have no idea what DK means on: March 16, 2006 08:41:33 AM
DK means double knitted, which came about because if you take 2 strands of fingering/sock yarn it comes out the same weight. Two strands of DK is equivalent to heavy worsted or aran weight yarn. I believe DK is actually about the same as sport yarn, and there are lots of patterns that would use it. Knit up some swatches in different sized needles to check the gauge (as well as with it doubled) and find a pattern that has close to the same gauge. Figuring out how many yards there are is better than going by number of skeins as different yarns, even of the same thickness, may have different yardages. Knitpicks.com has a pattern finder where you choose by type of yarn and it'll come up with both free patterns and some from books.

sue
3724  KNITTING / Knitalongs / Re: Clapotis from Knitty on: March 12, 2006 08:16:03 AM
After reading all 47 pages  Shocked I'm finally ready to join in the fun - albeit over a year after this KAL started!!

All your beautiful Clapoti (? whats the plural of Clapotis?!) had spurred me on and I wanted to create an equally beautiful one, but when I went to my LYS yesterday the selection was rather limited. I live in Sweden and most yarns seemed to be thick wool or cheapy arcylic. I eventually bought a wool/acrylic mix in purples, blues and pinks which I thought was quite pretty, but it is a lot heavier weight than the ones everyone else has created.

IIt is not as pretty as the yarn looked when it was in a ball and I'm wondered if it'll be too thick and wooly for me to drop the stitches...

Its 75% wool 25% acrylic - has anyone blocked anything similar? Does it give it a bit more drape when blocked.

I'm not sure if I should carry on and end up having a bit thick wooly Clapotis, or admit defeat and buy some nice expensive yarn off the internet as the LYs stores here are a bit rubbish! Any suggestions...

You could use larger needles than the pattern calls for, with less repeats. That will make it more drapey when the stitches are dropped, and about the right size without it being too heavy.

sue
3725  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Joining on a circular needle on: March 10, 2006 06:37:44 AM
It depends how you look at the needle. When casting on, they'll go all the way around to the other end, but.... then you turn the needle around, so the first stitch is on the left tip and the last one you just cast on is on the right side, with the yarn trailing off there. Then you take the yarn and start your first stitch in the left side, as if you were knitting flat, only with that first stitch, you've joined them together.

Make sense? Ask more questions if it doesn't....

sue
3726  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Newbie Knitter's Circular Needle Question... on: March 10, 2006 06:31:43 AM
You could soak them in warm water and lay them out with something heavy on the cable to straighten them (or sit on them -  Wink). They also straighten out as you use them; the weight of what you're knitting helps.

sue
3727  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: help...reading a pAttern on: March 09, 2006 03:14:21 PM
I'll take a try at it...

The `dec 2 sts every row' means continue to do 2 k2tog or p2tog every row as in the setup rows. Working one less stitch just means that you'll have one less stitch (to work on) before and after the decrease because you just decreased the number of stitches per row. Try it out and see if that works and you end up with 3 stitches.

sue
3728  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Yarn substitute help!!!! on: March 08, 2006 12:40:21 PM
I made the one from Stitch n Bitch Nation (I think it was) from cheap cotton yarn from Walmart. The kind you make dishclothes out of. Or you could make it out of Sugar n Cream. Either would only cost about $2-3.

sue
3729  KNITTING / Knitting: Completed Projects / Re: Anthropologie-inspired capelet + Tutorial! on: March 08, 2006 09:45:18 AM
Question - Since i love this pattern and it is so easy - anyone have any idea if i wanted to convert it to a baby size version ( being 6 months prego I am looking for fun, easy baby things to knit ) - I am not good enough at calculations to figure out how to make the switch from Full adult size to baby size - Any ideas? I bet a baby size one would knit up in just a few hours.....:-) My kind of knitting  Grin

That's a good thought, many people have made them for their daughters or granddaughters. You could use thin baby sport yarn and smaller needles and follow the pattern for number of stitches and rows. If you have some baby clothes already, especially 6 mo - 1 year size, measure from the neck to the bottom of the armhole for that measurement, and across the back just under the sleeve, then make yours the same size. It might take a few tries to experiment and get the sizing right, but for baby clothes, they keep growing anyway, so a little larger wouldn't hurt. Wink

sue
3730  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Re: Large Needle Knits on: March 08, 2006 09:33:25 AM
There's one of Vogue Knitting's small books called Chunky Knits, and I think patterns in The Yarn Girl's Guide to Simple Knits is more large needle than conventional size knitting.

sue
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