A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Need help? Click the HELP link at the top of the screen to read the docs or ask at the Help Desk.
Total Members: 299,152
Currently Running With Scissors:
573 Guests and 12 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop

  Show Images
Pages: [1]
1  Tutorial - 3-D Beaded Christmas Star Decoration in Winter Holidays by ceralea on: December 05, 2014 11:49:03 PM
Last  year when I posted pics of some beaded decorations I had made I was asked if I would write a tutorial.  Its only a year later, but there should be time to finish one or more before Christmas.

This is my first attempt at writing a tutorial - let me know if there is anything that needs extra explanation or clarifying in some way.

A bit of a disclaimer - I did not invent these.  I made my first one after reverse engineering a purchased decoration maybe 10 or 12 years ago, and I have seen similar ones available in the shops occasionally since then.

If anyone out there actually makes one I'd love to see the result.

This is really image heavy.
Clicking on any of the images will open the full size version in flickr or you can see the entire album here - https://www.flickr.com/photos/ceralea/sets/72157649212188309/

So - this is what we're making


Supplies
You will need


   30 round or round faceted beads 6 or 7mm diameter
   6 eye-pins  - 80mm length
   2-6 sets of 12 beads for the spikes.  Use a mix of shapes and sizes according to what looks good to you, and how long you want your spikes to be.
   34ga beading wire 60cm length.  Dont use a braided wire.  If you are more experienced at beading then use whatever you prefer nymo, elastic cord etc.
   Fine ribbon or cord for the hanging loop 10cm length

I generally use acrylic/plastic beads for these as it makes the decoration lighter in weight.  Use glass or crystal if you like but some steps involve applying a bit of pressure and when glass beads break its somewhat more hazardous than if a plastic one breaks.
I think the beading wire is easier to use for beginners as you dont need to worry about the tension quite as much, or how to tie a knot that wont come undone.  Its also easier to fix mistakes, like an extra bead, because you can cut the wire to fix the problem without the entire structure falling apart.
If youre starting out I wouldnt recommend using beads too much larger or smaller.  Smaller beads mean that it can be difficult to get the spikes in place and larger beads make it harder to get a rigid structure on the dodecahedron.
You can vary the spike bead sizes and eye-pin length as you wish (or even make your own eye-pins if you want longer spikes)

Tools
   A pair of small side cutters to cut the beading wire and possibly the eye-pins
   Fine nose pliers for creating the loops in the eye-pins.  Round nose is ideal but not required.

Main steps
1)   Make the centre beaded bead its a standard beaded dodecahedron.
2)   Make the beaded spikes.

Beaded dodecahedron
There are many different ways to make these beaded dodecahedrons, so if you already have your own favourite method, then feel free to use it.  If you dont like my method (or cant comprehend it!) and youd like a different perspective, then type beaded dodecahedron into your search engine of choice and see what comes back.  There are multiple tutorials and youtube vids out on the web for making these.

For these steps youll need your 30 6mm beads and the length of wire.
1)   Thread 10 beads (green) onto the wire and position them in the centre of the wire.


2)   Take one wire end and thread it back through the furthest bead so as to make a loop.  This wire end will be your working wire for the next steps.


3)   A)   Bend the non-working wire end back around the last bead to help hold the beads in place.  

B)   You could also put a temporary stop on by looping the wire through and around another bead  - just make it obviously different so you dont accidentally include it!

4)   Thread 3 beads (blue) onto your working wire and then thread it through the third and fourth bead from your current location. (ie skip two beads, then thread) Ensure that you are continuing to work around the loop rather than doubling back on yourself.


5)   Thread 3 beads (purple) onto your working wire and then thread the wire through the third and fourth bead from your current location - ie skip two beads, then thread.   Ensure that you are continuing to work around the loop rather than doubling back on yourself.


6)   Thread 2 beads (pink) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the middle bead of the three beads added in step 4 (the blue ones).  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


7)   Thread 1 bead (orange) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the middle bead of the three beads added in step 5 (the purple ones).  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


Cool   Thread 1 bead (dark pink) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the second bead of the two beads added in step 2 (the pink ones).  The wire will exit between the pink and blue beads.  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


9)   Pull everything up tight and loop the working wire around the previous wires at the intersection of the three beads to hold it.


10)   Pick up the wire end that you put aside in Step 3. This is now your working wire.   Oh look, and magically the beads are all now green.  The next steps repeat what we did above on the other half of the ball.


11)   Thread 3 beads (blue) onto your working wire and then thread it through the third and fourth bead from your current location. (ie skip two beads, then thread) Ensure that you are continuing to work around the loop rather than doubling back on yourself.


12)   Thread 3 beads (purple) onto your working wire and then thread the wire through the third and fourth bead from your current location - ie skip two beads, then thread.   Ensure that you are continuing to work around the loop rather than doubling back on yourself.


13)   Thread 2 beads (pink) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the middle bead of the three beads added in step 4 (the blue ones).  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


14)   Thread 1 bead (orange) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the middle bead of the three beads added in step 5 (the purple ones).  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


15)   Thread 1 bead (dark pink) onto your working wire, and then thread the wire through the second bead of the two beads added in step 2 (the pink ones).  The wire will exit between the pink and blue beads.  Again, you continue to work around the beads rather than going back on your work.


16)   Pull everything up tight and loop the working wire around the previous wires at the intersection of the three beads to hold it.

17)   Once youve completed the ball shape youll notice that its likely to be a bit floppy and has no strength to the structure.  To remedy this we continue threading the wire through the beads again to pull all of the joints up tight.


18)   Take one of your wire ends and thread it through the next bead (direction doesnt really matter at this point).  Youll notice that the wire only has two passes between the three beads.  A-B, B-C but not C-A.
Rather than threading directly from A into C well pull the join tight as we go.  Thread the wire down into the ball in the hole where beads A and B are, and then back out of the ball where beads B and C are. Pull the wire tight and thread through bead A.
This was really hard to show on the actual beads so Ive used some yarn and larger beads. The black circles represent the rings of beads in your dodecahedron.


19)   Continue cinching up all the joins round the dodecahedron.  If you end up at a join that has already been tightened then just thread your wire through some more of the beads till you get to an untightened one and then keep going.


20)   Once your wire end is too short (or youve done all the joins) thread the wire through a couple of beads, trim the end to a short length and push it inside the ball.

21)   Pick up the other wire-end and repeat steps 17, 18, 19 and 20.


Some Notes
Each of the intersections on the dodecahedron should have 3 beads and the loops formed in the beads should have 5 beads in a circle.  If you have more or less than that then youve gone wonky somewhere.
The ball needs to be reasonably rigid so as to allow for the decoration to maintain its shape once the spikes are added.
Try not to get too many kinks in the wire as you go as these can be weak points.

The Beaded Spikes

Now that you have the bead base we can do the fun bit.
For these steps youll need your eye-pins and the sets of 12 beads.

1)   Figure out a pleasing arrangement of beads for your decoration spikes.   Choose a mix of shape, size and finish that appeals to you, or make them all the same.
The spikes can be short, as in 1-2 beads, or as long as your eye-pins allow.
The only hard rule is that the bead which sits closest to the ball on each spike needs to be larger than the hole the spike threads through.  (ie larger than the hole formed by each five bead ring on your dodecahedron).


2)   Thread your beads onto the eye-pin and thread the eye-pin into one of the dodecahedron holes and then out the opposite hole.


3)   Thread the spike beads onto the eyepin (in reverse order to step 2!)


4)   Use your pliers to create a wire loop in the eye-pin, trimming the length down as needed.  Try and ensure that the loop you create holds all the beads snugly, but dont push it too hard or youll distort the shape of the dodecahedron ball.
No photos of using the pliers as taking a photo at the same time was impossible!


5)   Repeat steps-2-4 for the third and fourth spikes.


6)   Repeat steps-2-4 for the fifth and sixth spikes.


7)   Repeat steps-2-4 for the seventh and eighth spikes.


Cool   Repeat steps-2-4 for the ninth and tenth spikes.  Once you reach this point you might need to wiggle the eye-pin around to get it through the intersection of the previous eye-pins in the dodecahedron centre.


9)   Repeat steps-2-4 for spikes eleven and twelve (the last two!).   Again, wiggle as needed to get it through the intersection of the eye-pins.


10)   Thread the piece of ribbon or cord through one of the eye-pin loops and tie to make a hanging loop.


11)   Hang somewhere and enjoy.
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
2  Beaded Christmas Decorations in Winter Holidays by ceralea on: November 21, 2013 12:59:11 AM
I made these decorations to sell at our Playcentre fundraiser.
They are made up using a centre beaded bead with additional beads on eye pins stuck through to make the spikes.

They don't look quite the same hanging on a Kowhai instead of a Christmas tree but hey, it's a bit early yet!


Christmas Decoration, Handmade by me - Shiny White by ceralea, on Flickr


Christmas Decoration, Handmade by me - Silver and Aqua by ceralea, on Flickr


Christmas Decorations, Handmade by me by ceralea, on Flickr

Or have a look here if you want to see some more   http://www.flickr.com/photos/ceralea/sets/72157637899306764/
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
3  Little Felt Squirrel in CHALLENGE 90 ENTRIES by ceralea on: September 08, 2013 01:54:25 AM
Hi All, since I finally succumbed to the lure of a craftster account I thought I would join in on the challenge.
(Hope this is ok for the challenge given it's not my pattern, if not mods please delete.)
This is a squirrel made from wool felt.  The pattern is from this blog - http://nuno-runo.blogspot.co.nz/2013/04/squirrel.html
He's sitting rather uncomfortably wedged on a pinecone because he wouldn't sit upright on the table.

He was made as a gift for my boss who went on a trip to the US and really wanted to see a squirrel but never did...
It's 7.5cm tall - which according to google is about 3 inches.


ceralea - felt squirrel 2 by ceralea, on Flickr


ceralea- felt squirrel 4 by ceralea, on Flickr
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
Pages: [1]


FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Holiday Fashion Tips for Parties and More
Trend Alert: Lace Pumps
Stylist Tod Hallman Shares His No. 1 Red Carpet Essential
Denim Jacket Trends
Hottest Looks for the Holiday Season
Latest Blog Articles
Handmade Gift Ideas: Japanese Shibori Dyeing
@Home This Weekend: Embellished Guest Towels
Handmade Gift Ideas: Hostess Gift

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.