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1  Pierre, le tiny French kitty in Felting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: September 10, 2012 09:18:20 AM
Bonjour! I am le tiny French kitty, Pierre.



I am a needle felted gift for sunshine's dad, made from scraps of alpaca & wool roving, glass eyes, and a teeny scrap of t-shirt for my neckerchief. Le mew!
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2  Speedy Recovery Felted Slippers in Knitting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: June 30, 2012 07:00:29 AM


A last-minute project to send a bit of comfort to my Auntie Fay in Vancouver. She took a nasty spill & damaged her eye socket, so I thought something special to help her heal would be in order.

My parents & sister were visiting while I knit these, and I was lucky enough to sneak into the condo they rented to use a non-coin-op washing machine. Hooray! What a difference it makes, to be able to pull them out before the spin cycle. The last time I made these, it took quite a bit of fighting to get them into a vaguely slipper-esque shape. These were no trouble at all, and the Lion Brand Fishermens Wool I used really does felt amazingly well.



I squiggled a little puffy paint on their bums for grippiness-- it's not very symmetrical but definitely does the trick!

The pattern was French Press Felted Slippers from French Press Knits. Glorious pressed-flower button from my local yarn shop <3
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3  First Stab at Hand "Dyed" Plastic Bag Yarn-- Happy Earth Day! in Dyeing: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: April 22, 2012 08:56:59 AM


I was overjoyed to learn about plarn some time ago. I was in college (read: no yarn budget), so the idea of making my own yarn out of the plastic bags I already had was an absolute win. I learned the method from this excellent tutorial from RecycleCindy & had loads of fun making durable sling bags & even a garden tote for my mom. Instant hipster street cred!

But, eventually, I got bored. As it turns out, I do almost all my shopping from places with unattractive white bags with rudely bold logos, and I got tired of my projects reflecting that fact.

After a period of dormancy, I was determined to try plarn again, and brainstormed a few ways to improve upon or spice up the process. Several unsuccessful experiments later (let me just tell you now: drop spindle + plarn = curse words), I stumbled upon a darn useful method of stripping logos off & introducing some intentional color into the otherwise bland world of plarn.

First off, I used rubbing alcohol to remove the logo & writing from each bag.


Then I went to town with the permanent markers-- see tutorial post for tips about marker selection if you want to try it yourself


I rolled & sliced it into strips just like in Cindy's directions:



Then looped the strips together & crocheted a groovy self-variegating plarn swatch!


I'm super psyched to try more with this method, even though it is a bit time-consuming. The bags are basically like natural sock blanks, so I'm imagining all kinds of crazy dyeing like zigzags, vertical stripes, polka dots, faux Fair Isles... And for Mother's Day, I'm helping my niece & nephew draw pictures on their bags before we plarn-ify them into a Garden Tool Tote for their mom. Wheeeeee, too much fun!

If you'd like to read more about the recycley roots of this project & some tips for trying it yourself, boogie on over to this here post & enjoy!
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4  The 2-Hour, $4 Carmelita Headband! in Knitting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: November 19, 2011 08:23:36 AM
This pattern has been distilled & refined so many times, it belongs in a damn bottle. It all began with a simple request: to create a headband cute enough to rope in new knitters, but simple enough that they can actually make one themselves (with several hours of training & guidance from yours truly, that is). Many prototypes & half-finished experiments later, I'm glad to say my beginners prevailed & are unbelievably proud of the result! The class version was a smidgen different-- garter stitch edges instead of ribbing to help them build confidence before purling arrives on the scene-- but I'm rather pleased with the final result.

Alert to my fellow time-crunched holiday knitters out there: especially if you already know how to make short rows, this is an embarrassingly fast knit. Start-to-finish, including sewing on a button, I pumped the sample out in an hour & a half (and I'm not particularly speedy in the first place). I used top notch chunky baby alpaca yarn, but the expense is offset by the fact that you can easily squeeze 3 or maybe 4 bands out of 1 hank. If you're new to short rows, your first try might take a little longer, but it's a wonderful technique that crops up all over the place.

Without further ado, the faster-than-a-speeding-bullet Carmelita Headband!





Pattern available for free at Alpaca Direct
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5  Celebrate Banned Books Week with Owlie Cabled Study Gloves! (with pattern) in Knitting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: September 24, 2011 03:15:25 PM


Just in time to cozy up with my new copy of Grendel in honor of Banned Books Week! I perpetually get cold hands while I read, so I find myself contorting into odd poses to keep a blanket around my arms without blocking the light on the book. But no more! I splurged for chunky baby alpaca, so chilly will no longer be an issue Smiley

In case you are itching to try some, this is my "by the numbers" version of the pattern, designed to walk you through stitch-by-stitch. Pretty print-formatted PDFs are available at my blog, as is a no-nonsense edition of the pattern for smartypants knitters.

Materials:
  • 1 hank Cascade Chunky Baby Alpaca (or 100 yd similar yarn)
  • Five US 10 double-pointed needles
  • stitch marker
  • cable needle
  • Four 1/4″ buttons, plus sewing needle & thread

Stitches & Abbreviations:
  • dpns double-pointed needles
  • m1 make 1 new stitch by picking up the running thread from the back & knitting it
  • c4b slip 2 stitches to cable needle & bring to back of your work, knit 2 regular stitches, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle
  • c4f slip 2 stitches to cable needle & bring to front of your work, knit 2 regular stitches, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle
  • k2tog knit 2 stitches together
  • [instructions] brackets dont need any special treatment; they are just to help keep instructions organized

Directions:

Left glove:

Cast on 20 stitches & divide evenly between 4 dpns, being careful not to twist the cast-on. Place marker & join.

  • Rounds 1-12: *k2, p2* repeat around (2 x 2 ribbing)
  • Round 13:  knit around
  • Round 14: *k4, m1* repeat around 25 stitches in round
  • Round 15: knit around

Now, youll rearrange the stitches on your dpns to make the counting easier. From the marker, leave 2 stitches on the first dpn. Place the next 12 stitches on the second dpn. Place the next 9 stitches on the third dpn & leave the last 2 stitches on the fourth dpn. The brackets will help you see what happens on each dpn.

  • Round 16: [k1, m1, k1], [k2, p8, k2], [k9], [k1, m1, k1] 27 stitches in round
  • Round 17: [k3], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k3]
  • Round 18: [k1, m1, k2], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k2, m1, k1] 29 stitches in round
  • Round 19: [k4], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k4]
  • Round 20: [k1, m1, k3], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k3, m1, k1] 31 stitches in round
  • Rounds 21-24: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 25: [k5], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k4]
  • Round 26: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Rounds 27 & 28: [k5,], [p2, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 29: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 30: [k5], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k4]
  • Round 31: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 32: knit around
  • Round 33: [k5], [k12], [k9], but dont work the last 5 stitches on the fourth dpn

Slip the first 5 stitches  of the round & the last 5 stitches of the round onto a piece of scrap yarn & set aside these will become your gloves thumb later (10 stitches total). Cast on 1 extra stitch across the gap to connect the remaining stitches in a round, and rearrange evenly on your dpns (22 stitches total).

  • Rounds 34 & 35: knit around
  • Round 36: purl around
  • Round 37: *k2tog, yo* repeat around
  • Round 38: purl around
  • Round 39: knit around

Loosely bind off the 22 stitches from your dpns.

Slip the thumb stitches back onto your dpns & distribute evenly (you may only want to use 3 dpns here). Pick up & knit 1 stitch in the gap where the thumb meets the body of the glove (11 stitches total).

Rounds 1-3: knit around

Loosely bind off all thumb stitches.

Right glove:

Cast on 20 stitches & divide evenly between 4 dpns, being careful not to twist the cast-on. Place marker & join.

  • Rounds 1-12: *k2, p2* repeat around (2 x 2 ribbing)
  • Round 13:  knit around
  • Round 14: *k4, m1* repeat around 25 stitches in round
  • Round 15: knit around

Now, youll rearrange the stitches on your dpns to make the counting easier. From the marker, leave 2 stitches on the first dpn. Place the next 9 stitches on the second dpn. Place the next 12 stitches on the third dpn & leave the last 2 stitches on the fourth dpn. The brackets will help you see what happens on each dpn.

  • Round 16: [k1, m1, k1], [k9], [k2, p8, k2], [k1, m1, k1] 27 stitches in round
  • Round 17: [k3], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k3]
  • Round 18: [k1, m1, k2], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k2, m1, k1] 29 stitches in round
  • Round 19: [k4], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k4]
  • Round 20: [k1, m1, k3], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k3, m1, k1] 31 stitches in round
  • Rounds 21-24: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 25: [k5], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k4]
  • Round 26: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Rounds 27 & 28: [k5,], [k9], [p2, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1], [k5]
  • Round 29: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 30: [k5], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k4]
  • Round 31: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 32: knit around
  • Round 33: [k5], [k9], [k12], but dont work the last 5 stitches on the fourth dpn

Slip the first 5 stitches  of the round & the last 5 stitches of the round onto a piece of scrap yarn & set aside these will become your gloves thumb later (10 stitches total). Cast on 1 extra stitch across the gap to connect the remaining stitches in a round, and rearrange evenly on your dpns (22 stitches total).

  • Rounds 34 & 35: knit around
  • Round 36: purl around
  • Round 37: *k2tog, yo* repeat around
  • Round 38: purl around
  • Round 39: knit around

Loosely bind off the 22 stitches from your dpns.

Slip the thumb stitches back onto your dpns & distribute evenly (you may only want to use 3 dpns here). Pick up & knit 1 stitch in the gap where the thumb meets the body of the glove (11 stitches total).

Rounds 1-3: knit around

Loosely bind off all thumb stitches.

Diving in Deeper:

What is with all the brackets?

Yeah, I know knitting patterns arent supposed to look like math textbooks, right? But bear with me here for a minute. If you havent started a pair of these gloves, this probably looks super threatening & you cant imagine how such ugliness could ever be helpful. Heres the dealio, though: when you reach that part of the pattern, you have your 25 stitches split very strategically across 4 double-pointed needles. The brackets help you see what is happening on each of the 4 needles theyre just a way to visually break up the round into bite-size chunks!

Split very strategically? Want to elaborate a little there?

In my Holly Holiday voice: I thought youd never ask! While the gunk inside the brackets looks like word soup at first glance, there really is a pattern from round to round. Take a look at the left glove, for example.

  • The first & last brackets correspond to the stitches on your first & last dpns. They start off with only 2 stitches each, but increase every other round until they hold 5 stitches each. Then, they sit tight & get knit until its time to turn those stitches into the thumb of your glove.
  • The second bracket is where your owl will take shape. The written-out directions are hard to visualize, but the chart below might help you see whats really going on under all that purling & cabling.



  • The third bracket is plain-Jane knit stitches, every single round! This chunk of stitches will become the palm of your glove.
  • Then, to make your right glove, its the same process, just with the 2nd & 3rd brackets switched!

Why the floopy yarn-overs at the end of the glove?

This is a purely stylistic choice that you are, of course, welcome to modify or leave out altogether. From round 37 onward, youre creating some raised eyelets for the top edge of your gloves. They are there for two reasons: first, to combat the rolling tendency of plain old stockinette stitch, and second, to look classy as hell. Who wants ribbing at the top of fingerless gloves, right?

Finishing:

Weave in ends & trim. Sew buttons into place as the owls eyes the little square of purled stitches marks where they belong. Now slip them on & never choose between cute & smart again!

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6  Gone Fishin' for the Dead Fish Hat! + Short Rows Tute (Image Heavy) in Knitting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: August 05, 2011 04:15:45 PM
What do you get when you cross a lakeside community, bright sunshine yellow & ocean green yarn, and a Calvin & Hobbes-style sense of silliness? Why, the Dead Fish Hat, of course!


The moment I saw Thelma Egberts' rather unexpected creation on Ravelry (available for free on Thelma's Dead Fish Hat site & through Knitty magazine), I immediately knew I had to make one. It seems like just the thing to commemorate a joyful summer by the lake (and to make my knitting cohorts cackle with delight).

Perhaps my favorite design element of this truly original hat is the curvy fish lips. The shape somehow manages to evoke the distinctive shape of an actual fish's mouth while still maintaining the cartoonish charm of the hat as a whole. To achieve this effect, Thelma's pattern employs two important elements: stockinette stitch to encourage the edge to roll, and short rows to lengthen the top & bottom of the mouth area (that's what makes the lips curve like a rainbow). I suspect the stockinette element isn't going to blow anyone's mind, but those darn short rows have a reputation for being cumbersome. But fear not, dear crafters; whether you're new to short rows or a seasoned veteran, this hat is well within your grasp!



Short rows are often classed with ordinary increases like make 1 or knit front & back, but I think that it's a mistake to store the idea of a short row in the same mental category as these techniques. Where a regular increase selectively widens your work (turning a row of 12 stitches into a row of 13 stitches, for example), short rows selectively lengthen it.


If you can keep this in mind conceptually, short rows start to feel like exactly what they are: just another way to play with the shape of your knitted work. That said, if this is your first try at short rows or you simply don't feel inclined to think about the "big picture" today, you can really just step through the Dead Fish Hat line by line & do just great.

Take a look at the "Shape Mouth" section of the pattern, and I'll show you what I mean. You've just finished several rounds of stockinette to form the lip, and now it's time to work your first short row. To work row 1, just keep on knitting for 27 stitches like nothing's happened at all, as if you're working another ordinary round. Once you knit that 27th stitch, though, you're going to turn your work over as if it were flat (like a scarf or a dishcloth), and purl back in the direction you came from. Do you see why they're called short rows? They're just like regular rows of knitting, except that they don't extend across the entire width of your work.


To prevent unattractive little holes in your work, the pattern says to W&T at the end of each row, which stands for "Wrap & Turn." This is possibly the only truly new move that short rows will demand of you, but in the immortal words of Douglas Adams, don't panic! Once you've done all the knitting or purling the row calls for, slip one additional stitch from the left needle to the right.


Bring the working yarn around the stitch (if it started in the back, bring it to the front, or vice versa), and then put that slipped stitch back where you found it. See what you did? There's now a cute little yarn lasso connecting your short row to the rest of your knitting! How slick are you?


Very slick indeed.

Now just keep on working, stepping through the rows one by one. On your first pass at rows 1-16, you're making one lip on one side of the fish. Then, row 17 brings you to the other side of the fish, and you repeat rows 2-16 to build the second lip on the other side. Here's a row-by-row chart of what you're doing, starting with the red row at the bottom & working upward in order of rainbow colors:


However, you'll notice that as your work progresses, those nice straight rows of stockinette you started with (the curly lip part) will actually begin to curve to meet the edges of your short rows! Shape-wise, it'll look more like this:


Basically a birds-eye-view of Madonna, circa 1989

Nifty, eh? In fact, if you were to change colors on every row (which I emphatically discourage-- So. Many. Tails...), you'd see something pretty darn similar to the grid above. Remember that the bottom red edge represents a formerly straight row of stockinette stitches from the beginning of the pattern. See how they curve?


A note to those already familiar with short rows, or to those who plan to apply this method in other circumstances: this pattern is unique in that you don't have to do anything special to work the wraps. Very unique, as a matter of fact. That's usually the part that knitters dread the most, but on the Fish Hat, it's quite unnecessary (hooray!). Normally, when you knit across one of those stitches you lassoed previously, you must take special measures to push the wrap to the back of your work. It's a nice way to keep your work connected without that telltale bar across your stitches. But since the Fishy has such cute curly lips, you'll find that all your immaculately-worked wraps never even see the light of day, so my vote is to not stress about it!

Well, folks, there you have it-- a quick introduction to the ever-so-clever use of short rows! Once you've worked the mouth of this hat, you're ready to plug short rows into all kinds of other pieces-- in fact, the great Elizabeth Zimmermann swears by a few of them at the back of a sweater neckline to prevent the bottom from riding up. You're also through the toughest part of your Fishy, too, so double congratulations! If your sense of accomplishment makes you feel ambitious, scoot on over to Thelma's Dead Fish Hat site & look at all the cool things you can do with color in this pattern!

Until next time, blub blub blub (that's fish-speak for "Happy knitting!")!
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7  Cristaria lace shrug-- Free tutorial & pattern! in Knitting: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: July 18, 2011 05:19:37 PM
Named for a pearl mussel that produces freshwater pearls, the Cristaria shrug is a quick, pretty knit shrug that complements formal summer ensembles or casual looks alike. Add beads or pearls for a piece that is truly your own!



Materials:

  • 100 g Cascade Ultra Pima or similar
  • US 10 circular needles, 20˝ or longer
  • About 25 freshwater pearls (optional)
  • About 25 head pins (optional)

Stitch abbreviations:

  • yo yarn over
  • k2tog knit 2 stitches together

Directions & Hints:

Cast on 108 stitches, leaving at least a 12˝ tail. This will seem longer than it needs to be, but dont fret! Take a look at the picture to the right. Imagine taking your straight cast-on edge & bending it into the wavy bottom edge of the shrug. Thats why your finished piece wont be anywhere near as wide as it seems now.

  • Row 1: knit across
  • Row 2: purl across

Here comes the exciting part: the lace row. This sequence of increases & decreases is what turns a fairly ordinary stitch pattern into something visually interesting (and, in this case, wavy!). During each repeat, you are going to decrease a total of 6 times (the k2tog stitches) and increase a total of 6 times (the yarn overs). So, even though youre subtracting stitches in some places & adding them in others, your total stitch count at the end of each row should always be the same (108, to be precise).

  • Row 3: k2tog 3 times, *k1, yo* 6 times, k2tog 3 times. Place stitch marker. Repeat across row 5 more times.

Phew! Take a step back & congratulate yourself you just finished the tricky part & I bet it looks like a rats nest, doesnt it? Just remember: youre taking a wavy row & straightening it out onto your needle, so it really should look a bit confused.



  • Row 4: knit across

And thats really all there is to it! Youll repeat those 4 rows about 14 more times, depending on how big around youd like your armholes. To finish, bind off & break yarn, leaving at least a 12˝ tail.

Diving in Deeper:

The lace row sure does have a lot of counting wouldnt it be a lot easier to use more markers?

A tempting proposition, no? Normally, I prefer to use markers like big red flags to remind me when its time to change stitches. In this pattern, though, the markers are smack dab in the middle of a bunch of k2togs! There is method to my madness (well, this time, at least). This is an atypical lace pattern in that the increases are all bundled together & the decreases are all bundled together. A more regular (rectangular) pattern usually peppers them across the row in pairs. Because of this, if you plunk down markers willy-nilly, they will actually migrate across the row & mess you up! So, the short answer is that markers are only useful to a point on this pattern. Think of them more as error correction tools if you end up with anything other than 18 stitches between markers, you know something has gone wrong in that section.

The short answer? That didnt seem very short at all. Out of morbid curiosity, what was the long answer?

Plate tectonics!

Excuse me?

No, really! The stitch markers show you the center of a double-sided stitch subduction zone basically a stitch gobbler. Its like the stitch markers are hovering over very aggressive black holes that pull stitches in & make them disappear. Conversely, in the middle of each increase section (right after the 3rd yarn over, to be precise) is a mid-ocean ridge of stitches a place where new stitches bubble up to the surface & spread out. If you placed a stitch marker at each of these spots,  you could imagine them hovering over tiny stitch factories, creating new stitches & pumping them outward. The whole row would look something like this:



Which, to me, looks a whole lot like this:



Wow, this is really getting out of hand. Anything else youve been dying to get off your chest?

Well, since you asked The idea for how & where to use stitch markers (as a way to catch & isolate mistakes instead of to tell you when to change stitches) came from the mathematical basis for error-correcting code. Also, the function y(x) = 2.5 cos (2π x/13), with x & y in centimeters, describes each row of this pattern. Whee!

Finishing:

String a single freshwater pearl onto each of about 25 head pins. Trim pin ends & bend into loops. Attach pins at the bottom of the soft U-shaped rows of the center 3 columns of stitches (see picture), or use whatever arrangement strikes your fancy.



Use reserved yarn tails to attach corners of finished piece to create armholes. Weave in ends & trim.

Now throw it over a sundress & go put Audrey Hepburn to shame.



Ready to turn your screen off & start knitting? Visit my shop's blog for printable PDF versions of this tutorial & even a bare-bones pattern if you're sick of my rambling! Smiley
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8  Autumn Honeybee Upcycled Mittens in Needlework: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: December 21, 2010 03:32:40 PM
Hidy ho, needlework neighbors! Just put the finishing touches on my first ever embroidery project, which began life as an upcycling/sewing project. I'd love love love to learn more about embroidery and hone my technique, so please constructively criticize to your crafty heart's content.



A little bumbly bee buzzing around between branches! These are part of a honey-themed Christmas gift for my wonderful little sister.



And now the full enchilada! The idea for the branches came from the adorable and inspiring Wooly Embroidery. The mittens themselves are made of boiled wool cut from a Goodwill sweater, then soaked in lanolin to make them water resistant.

The branches are a stem stitch, then the bobbly endy things are a variety including satin stitches, long & short stitches, and my sad, sorry attempt at a twisted chain... Let's just call it an organic look, right?  Grin

Thanks for looking and happy holidays!
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9  Re: Your Best Pumpkin Recipes!! in Recipes and Cooking Tips by sunshineravioli on: October 11, 2010 06:31:11 AM
What a fabulous thread idea! I am so in the mood for fall stuff and pumpkin baking is now at the top of my list!

There are so many scrumptious sounding recipes up already that I worry mine might just be overkill, but I couldn't resist... These are my mama's Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies that kick butt like the day is long. Blue ribbons at the county fair, every time! I worked it up on a recipe card template from messyvegetariancook.com for my co-workers, so I figured I'd just post that for simplicity's sake. Happy baking!

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10  Labyrinth Coffee Mug (or, why I need to grow a backbone) in Stenciling: Completed Projects by sunshineravioli on: August 01, 2010 03:46:07 PM
Hi ho, image reproducers! I know glass is a strange medium for stencilling, but I managed to volunteer myself to make this crazy-detailed coffee mug and need to show someone who understands what a bad idea it was.



It's some kind of medieval Christian symbol that my assistant manager requested. Still not quite sure why I said I'd do it, but, let's face it, I am both crafty and a pushover. Smiley

I don't have much of a steady hand, so I employed excessive amounts of electrical tape to lay the pattern:



And then painted *many* layers of paint using a paint pen. That gave me the basic stripy outline to work with, and I added in the connecting lines by hand. Then LOTS of touch-up work with toothpicks, Q-Tips, and nail polish remover. Many episodes of Pushing Daisies later...



Plus, it leaves a wicked cool shadow Cheesy
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