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1  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / BASIC SEWING TECHNIQUES (Tutorials) on: July 07, 2005 04:21:37 PM
I really didn't know where to put this.  I plan on locking this topic, so if you have question, or comments please PM me with them.  Anyways, hopefully these will help out all of my fellow craftsters.

Seam Allowance Techniques
  Trimming
  Grading
  Clipping
  Notching

Hand-Stitching Techniques
  Slip-Stitch
  Blind-Hem Stitch
  Catch-Stitch
  French Hand-Rolled Hem

Seam Techniques
  Plain Seam
  Corded or Piped Seam
  Flat-Felled Seam
  False Flat-Felled Seam
  French Seam
  Mock French Seam
  Gathered Seam

Seam Finishing Techniques
  Bias-Bound
  Hong Kong
  Net-Bound
  Zigzagged
  Pinked

Zipper Closure Techniques
  Centered Zipper
  Lapped Zipper
  Invisible Zipper
  Fly-Front Zipper

Buttons and Buttonholes, Velcro Techniques
  Buttonholes
  Flat Buttons
  Shank Buttons
  Velcro

Miscellaneous
  Pre-Shrinking Fabrics
 
2  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Shower Curtain Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:28:17 PM
How to Make Shower Curtains

1.  Measure Opening
A standard shower curtain measures 72" X 72". For the finished curtain width, measure the length of your curtain rod.  For the finished curtain length, measure from the rod to approximately half way down the sides of the tub.

2.  Cut Each Panel
Because the width of a standard sized curtain exceeds the width of the fabric, two panels of fabric will need to be sewn together to create one wide curtain. For a balanced effect, allow one whole panel in the center and split the remaining panel on either side.

3.  Sew Panels Together
With right sides of fabric facing, pin and stitch side panels to either side of center panel.  Press seams open and finish edges.

4.  Hem Curtain Sides
Turn up and press 8" on upper/lower edge of curtain. Tuck in cut edge to meet crease and press again creating a  4" double thickness hem. Top-stitch through all layers of fabric along inside fold.  Turn up and press 4" on side edges of curtain. Tuck in cut edge to meet crease and press again creating a 2" double thickness hem. Top-stitch through all layers of fabric along inside fold.

5.  Buttonholes Header
To accommodate the 12 decorative rings, you will need to make 12 buttonholes.  Mark the location of each opening. Each mark on the right side of the curtain should measure 1" from the finished top edge of the curtain. The first and last mark should measure 3" from the finished side edge of the curtain and the remaining 10 openings should measure 6" between each.

Calculate Fabric for a 72" x 72" Curtain
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
1.  Add 1" to the width for allowance of the two seams joining the side panels to the center, and 8" for the side hems, and add 18" to the desired length.
2.  Take your adjusted width measurement and subtract the width of the Fabric that you are planning to use (either 45" or 60"). 
3.  Divide the remaining number in half and you have the width for the two side panels to sew to the center panel.

Example:   
1.  Shower Curtain:  72" by 72"
2.  Add seam allowances and hem allowances:  81" by 88"
3.  Subtract fabric width from adjusted width:  (45" width)36"  (60" width)21"
4.  Divide in half:  (45" width)18"  (60"width)10.5"

45" Cut: (1)45" x 88"    (2)21" x 88"       
60" Cut: (1)60" x 88"    (2)60" x 10.5"
3  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Throw Pillow Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:26:26 PM
How to Make Throw Pillows

1.  Measure Pillow Form
Measure the length and width of your pillow form along the sewn edges and jot down the dimensions

2.  Choose Fabric, and Pre-shrink
Check the cleaning instructions on the end of the bolt of fabric before purchasing. If you intend to wash the pillow cover, you must pre-shrink the fabric.
 
3.  Cut Pillow Front Piece
To create the front of the pillow cover, cut one piece of fabric the same size as the pillow form. Because the fabric should fit snugly over the pillow form, this measurement includes a 1/2 inch seam allowance. If the pillow form is very firm, it may be necessary to add 1 inch to both the length and width of the pillow.

4.  Cut Pillow Back Pieces
To create the back of the pillow cover, cut one piece of fabric the same width as the front piece of the pillow and 4 inches longer than the length of the pillow front. Fold the piece in half lengthwise and cut along the fold. Turn this edge, which measures the same as the width of the pillow, under 1/4 inch and press, turn under again and stitch 1/16" from fold to secure. Repeat with the other back piece.  You  may want to simply cut the back piece of fabric exactly the same size as the front. This pillow cover will require a centered zipper closure if you want a removable cover.

6.  Stitch Front to Back
With right sides together, lay one half of the pillow back on the pillow front and pin in place. Pin the other half of the pillow back in place. The two pillow backs will overlap each other by 1 1/2 inches. Stitch the back and front together using a 1/2" seam allowance.  If the back of your pillow is a single piece of fabric, sew as directed, but leave an opening and add a centered zipper on that side on the pillow.

7.  Trim Excess
Trim the excess fabric from the corners.

8.  Turn Cover to Right Side   
Turn the pillow cover right side out and insert the pillow form.
4  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Pillow Cases Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:25:19 PM
How to Make Pillow Cases

1.  Fabric Preparation   Trim fabrics to the following sizes:
Main Fabric:      
  Standard:  26" x 41"
  Queen:  30" x 41"
  King:  36" x 41"
Contrast Fabric:  10" x 41"
Trim Fabric:  1 1/2" x 41"

2.  Pin Fabrics Together
Press trim fabric in half lengthwise.   Spread main fabric right side up, with one of the 26" edge nearest you.  Place trim along the right hand 42" edge of your main fabric.  All raw edges should line up and face out. Layer your contrast fabric next, matching cut edges.  Pin in place, making sure to catch all layers.

3.  Sew Together
Sew all three fabrics together using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Spread out fabric right side up, lightly iron, pressing your seam toward the contrast fabric.

4.  Stitch Contrasting Fabric in Place
Turn raw edge of contrasting fabric toward the wrong side, 1/2" and press creating a crisp crease.  Turn half remaining width of contrast to wrong side, coving the seam allowance (about 1/8" extended past stitching line); press.  Pin to hold in place.  Turn pillowcase right side out.  Top-stitch along the edge of the contrast seam (on right side), being sure to catch folded edge of contrast that was turned/pinned to wrong side.

5.  Pin Side Seams
Fold your fabric in half right sides out, with the contrast and trim on the right side.  Pin around the open ended side and bottom.

6.  Sew a French Seam
Sew 1/4" seam with the right sides facing out, trim seam allowance to half of the width.  Turn pillowcase so the seam in now on the inside of the pillowcase, and the right sides of the fabric are facing each other.  Push the seam all the way to the outside, and pin in place, press if necessary.  Sew another 1/4" seam to enclose the first 1/4" seam.  Turn right sides out, and press seams.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Main Fabric:  Pillow width x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.
Contrast Fabric:  10" x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.
Trim Fabric:  1 1/2" x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.



How To Make Housewife Pillow Cases
Plain pillow cases, known as housewife pillow cases, are very easy to make. They are cut in one piece from across the width of the fabric.  The fabric is hemmed at each side, folded and stitched with an overlapping flap at the back to hold the pillow in place. This simple style gives a crisp look on any bed.

1.  Cut Fabric
(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard Size (20" by 26"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 60" wide by 21" high.
Queen Size (20" by 30"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 68" wide by 21" high.
King Size (20" by 36"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 80" wide by 21" high.

2.  Hem Sides
Turn under a double 1/2" hem at one end of the fabric. Stitch and press.  At the opposite end turn under a double 2" hem. Stitch and press.

3.  Mark 6""From Hem
Place the fabric on a flat surface, wrong side up, and mark a line with pins 6" from the end with the small hem.

4.  Fold in Edges
Fold the end with the large hem to this mark, and pin in place.  Fold the end with the small hem over the top and past the edge of the large hem by 2".  Pin the side seams.

5.  Stitch Side Seams
Stitch both side seams through all thicknesses using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Trim seam allowance to half of the width.

6.  Turn and Press
Turn wrong side out and press, stitch both side seams through all thicknesses using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Turn right side out and press.  Place the pillow inside the pillow case and tuck it under the flap to secure.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Cut one piece of fabric measuring width of pillow with 8" added x height of pillow with 1" added.
5  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Pillow Sham Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:23:17 PM
How to Make Pillow Shams

1.   Measure Pillow
To determine the size pillow you own, measure the length of your bed pillow and jot down the dimension: Standard size pillows measure approximately 26" wide, queen size pillows measure approximately 30" wide, and king size pillows measure approximately 36" wide.

2.   Cut Sham
On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed fabric design to be identical for each pillow sham front.

To make one sham
Cut 1 sham front:(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard(20"x 26"): 30" high X 36" wide Queen(20"x 30"): 30" high X 40" wide King(20" x 36"): 30" high X 46" wide

Cut 2 Sham backs:
(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard: 30" high X 28" wide Queen: 30" high X 32" wide King: 30" high X 38" wide

3.   Hem Sham Backs
Turn under 8" and press to wrong side of fabric along inside vertical edge of each sham back. Open out crease, tuck the cut edge into the fold and press a 4" double hem. Pin and top stitch hem through all layers along inside fold.

4.   Stitch Front to Back
Place sham front right side up, flat on table. With right sides facing, place one sham back into position over front sham with top, bottom and side cut edges even - hemmed edge should be facing center. Pin and stitch front to backs along all outside edges through all layers. Trim seam, clip corners, turn to right side through back opening, press sham flat.

5.   Stitch Flange
On right side of sham, measure and mark a 4" border along all outside edges. Pin and top stitch through all layers of the sham along the marked border. Insert pillow through opening in back.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
For Sham Front: Pillow dimensions plus 10" (Cut one)
For Sham Backs: Same height as calculated front measurement, Subtract 8" from the calculated width measurement.  (Cut two)
6  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Duvet Cover Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:21:31 PM
How to Make Duvet Covers

1.  Measure Duvet
Measure the length and width of your duvet and jot down the dimensions.

2.   Cut Panels (for duvets 53" or narrower.)
For duvet widths that measure less than your fabric width, cut the intended length of fabric crosswise into 2 lengths (one for the cover top and one for the cover bottom). On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the selvage edge. The 2 lengths may not be equal in length but the identical print area of each panel will be the same length and must measure at least 1 1/2" longer than the measured duvet.

3.   Cut and Assemble Panels
(for duvets 54" or wider.)
For duvet widths that exceed your fabric width, cut the intended length of fabric crosswise into 4 lengths (two for the top cover and two for the bottom cover). On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the selvage edge. The 4 lengths may not be equal in length but the identical print area of all the panels will be the same length and must measure at least 1 1/2" longer than the measured duvet.

For the top of the cover, sew two of the panels of fabric together before cutting the cover to size. For a balanced effect, split the second panel in half lengthwise and stitch it to each side of the center panel. On print of plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the seams. Press seams open. For the bottom of the cover, split and stitch the 3rd and 4th panel together  in the same fashion.
 
4.   Cut Duvet Cover to Size
From the panels, cut the width to equal the measured duvet width plus 1 1/2". Cut the length to equal the measured duvet length plus 1 1/2". Cut 1 cover top and 1 cover bottom. The top and bottom of the cover are identical. On print or plaid fabrics, measure within the identical print area. For seamed panels (larger covers) cut from the center area.

5.   Stitch Cover
With all cut edges even and right sides facing, pin and stitch together the top and bottom of the cover along the 2 side edges and the foot edge - using a 1/2" seam allowance. Press open all seams. Turn the cover to the right side through the head opening and press flat along all stitched edges.

6.   Hem Cover
Turn under 1" and press a crease to wrong side of fabric along head edge on top cover and bottom cover separately. Open out crease, tuck the cut edge into the fold and press a 1/2" double hem along top edge. Pin and top stitch through all layers along inside fold.

7.   Stitch Hems Together
With hemmed edges even, measure and mark the head edge of the cover 12" to 15" from each side seam. Pin the edges together and top stitch the top cover to the bottom cover through all layers from the mark to the side seam using the hem stitching as your guide. Backstitch securely at the ends of the stitching leaving the head of the cover open in the center.

8.   Mark Tie Placement
Pairs of fabric ties will be positioned in the opening at the hemmed edge of the cover. Spacing evenly, mark the placement of the ties beginning at each end of the opening and allowing approximately a 12" space between each mark. On the inside of the cover, mark both the top and bottom. You will need to make 1 tie for each placement.

9.   Assemble Tie Closures
The cutting dimensions of each tie closure measures 13" long X 3" wide. Measure and draw a tissue paper pattern following these dimensions. Using your iron, fold end edges inward 1/2" (wrong sides together), press flat.  Next press it in half lengthwise, like a hot dog (wrong sides out.)  Open what you just pressed, and press the seam allowance edges in towards the center crease on both sides.  Press the two folded edges together, making sure that they match in width.  Pin if necessary.  Stitch 1/16" from the folded edges to secure.  Repeat for remaining ties.

10.   Position Tie Closures
Pin a pair of ties (one to the top cover and one to the bottom cover) to the inside of the duvet cover opening at each placement marking. Stitch and backstitch securely through each tie end using the hem stitching on the cover as a guide. Insert the duvet in cover and tie opening closed.

*Instead of ties for the closures you could try buttons and buttonholes, velcro, or even a zipper.

*To help your duvet stay put (and not bunch up in the middle of the cover) you can sew loops of elastic into the seam allowances of the corners on the duvet corner, and sew buttons onto the corners of your duvet; or sew a length of ribbon (10" folded in half) into the seam allowances of the corners on the duvet cover, and sew another length of ribbon onto the corners of your duvet.
   

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Duvet Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Because there is not standard sizes for duvets I have created this easy way to calculate what you should cut for your pieced duvet cover.  If you plan on using a sheet (and therefore do not need to piece together fabric, just add 1 1/2" to the measurements of your duvet.
1.  Measure the length and width of your duvet along the sewn edges and jot down the dimensions.
2.  Add allowances for seams, add 3" to the width, and 3" to the length.
3.  Take your width measurement and subtract the width of the Fabric that you are planning to use (either 45" or 60"). 
4.  Divide the remaining number in half and you have the width for the two side panels to sew to the center panel.

Example:   
1.  Duvet cover:  66" by 96"
2.  Add seam allowances:  68" by 99"
3.  Subtract fabric 45" from width seam allowances:  23"
4.  Divide in half:  11.5"

Cut:  (1) 45" by 99"    (2) 11.5" by 99
7  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / HELP, I'm teaching a class and your ideas/thoughts are appreciated!!!!! on: June 27, 2005 03:03:45 PM
A friend of mine asked me to teach a class on easy ideas to re-do a room (i.e. duvet covers, etc.)

Well I have found a whole bunch of patterns and ideas and things that tell you how to do certain projects . . . but . . . the class is only about 1 hour long, so I am wondering how I should conduct the class, should I demonstrate how to sew something simple (like a pillowcase) or just go over the patterns and answer questions?  I'm just not sure how to approach this.

Any ideas on cute ways to keep the ladies interested in what I have to say, and maybe what I should do.  Keep in mind, that if I do bring in my sewing machine to show some techniques or something, I will be on the only one who has a sewing machine (they are not being told to bring anything).

Oh and if any of you craftsters have ideas of cute projects or something share them please.

The class is set for July 7th, so I need this help before then.
8  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / long hair question . . . on: March 31, 2005 09:41:43 AM
ok, well so today is the day that i ask all you craftistas to answer my lame questions.

anyways

well i have long hair (it reached beyond the hooks on my bra strap) its straight (not even a slight wave) and really thin (not much there) and well i am tired of wearing ponytails, and buns.  i'm sure that you crafty ladies can help a fellow craftster out and help me with my hair.  nothing crazy like dying it or anything, just what are some easy ways i can style my hair.  i work at a law office, so it also can't be too crazy.  i'm just completely at a loss as to what i should do with it.  give me some ideas you creative people.

9  OCCASIONS AND HOLIDAYS / Weddings and Bridal Showers / Moral Ettiquette Question on: March 31, 2005 09:38:01 AM
ok, well i didnt know where else to put this, but it kinda has to do with weddings, but not necessarily crafting.

Here is my dilema (i've been having a lot of those lately)  ok, i was married about 2 years ago, a month after we got married my husband was sent overseas to iraq and was gone for 8 months, and we've moved 3 times since he has gotten back.

moral of the story, my thank you notes from the gifts we recieved at the wedding accidentally got packed up (along with the list of who gave us what, so there was no re-doing the notes)  anyways, well we just moved again and finally got to up pack our boxes -- which brings me to my point.  i found the long lost thank-you cards . . . is it too late to send them (2 yrs) would sending them just remind everyone what a loser i am (b/c they probably already forgot that i never sent them a thank-you card) or should i send them anyways? (better late than never?)  if i do send them should i include a letter updating them about our lives, or what?  im completely at a loss, and i've put this off for long enough already.  i have half a mind to just throw them away and stop worrying about them,     


what would you craftistas do in my shoes?

edit:  ok i see the light, i wrote the letter last night, and made the necessary copies today at work, i'll package them up tonight and mail them off tomorrow.  thank you for the wonderful advice, i guess if i were on the other end i would rather have it late than never.
10  CRAFTY BUSINESS ADVICE / Crafty Business Discussion / .com or .net, is there a difference? on: March 31, 2005 09:32:40 AM
ok, here's my dilema, my business name is Jocole (registered and everything legally) but jocole.com is already taken (some stupid history teacher named john cole, DANG!)  anyways, but jocole.net is available.  does that bother you when you have to type in .net instead of the more common .com?  or as .net is becoming more and more common, does it not matter?  i seriously am having drama about this.  i dont want to make my url too long, like customjocole.com or anything . . . so i am at a loss.  what do you craftistas think about this problem? is it a problem, am i over-reacting?  or is it a valid point, what would you do in my shoes?
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