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21  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Hand-Stitching Techniques on: July 07, 2005 04:23:21 PM
Hand-Stitching Techniques

Slip-Stitch
The Slip-Stitch is a durable and almost invisible method suitable for a folded hem edge.  This stitch is slipped through the fold of the hem edge.
Directions:
1)  Stitches are worked from right to left.  Fasten thread, bringing needle and thread out through fold of hem. 
2)  Opposite, in the garment, take a small stitch, catching only a few threads.
3)  Opposite that stitch, in the hem edge, insert needle and slip through fold for about inch to the left.   Continue alternating the stitches in this way.

Blind-Hem Stitch
The Blind-Hem Stitch is taken inside, between the hem and the garment.  In the finished hem no stitches are visible.  It is a quick and easy stitch that can be used on any blind hem.
Directions:
1)  Work from right to left with needle pointing left.      
2)  Fold back the hem edge; fasten thread inside it. 
3)  Take a very small stitch approximately inch to the left in the garment; take the next stitch inch to the left in the hem.                    
4)  Continue to alternate stitches from garment to hem, spacing them approximately inch apart.  5)  Take care to keep stitches small just a thread or two will do.

Catch-Stitch
The Catch-Stitch (also called the Tailor's Hem) is a stitch used for flat hemming. This stitch is a bit more stable and secure than the blind-hemming stitch, and is particularly good for heavy fabrics.
Directions:
1)  Work from left to right with needle pointing left.      
2)  Fold back the hem edge and fasten thread inside it.
3)  Take a very small stitch, catching only a few threads, to the right in the garment; take the next stitch catching only a few threads to the right in the hem edge.   
4)  Continue to alternate stitches from the garment to hem, spacing them approximately to 3/8 inch apart.  Keep stitches small, especially when stitching on the garment fabric.   
   
French Hand-Rolled Hem
A French Hand-Rolled Hem has an elegant look.  Usually used on sheer fabrics.
Directions:
1)  Mark hemline; machine stitch inch below marked hemline.  Trim hem allowance 1/8 below stitching.
2)  Fold hem to wrong side, just far enough to reveal stitch line.
3)  Working right to left, take a small stitch through the fold; then 1/8 inch below and beyond that stitch, catch a few threads of garment.
4)  Pull thread to roll hem to wrong side.
22  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / Seam Allowance Techniques on: July 07, 2005 04:22:39 PM
Seam Allowance Techniques

Trimming
Trimming means cutting away some of the seam allowance.  It is done when the full width of the seam allowances would interfere with fit (as in an armhole) or with further construction (as in a French seam).  Both layers of fabric are cut at the same time.
Directions:
1)  It is the preliminary step to grading; seams are first trimmed to half their width before grading.

Grading
Grading (also called blending, layering, or beveling) is the cutting of seam allowances to different widths, with the seam allowance that will fall nearest the garment side cut the widest.  Grading is done after pressing.
Directions:
1)  It is recommended that seams be graded when they form an edge or are enclosed.
2)  The result is a seam that lies flat without causing a bulky ridge.

Clipping
Clipping is used on curved seams to allow them to lie smooth.  Clips are slits cut into the seam allowance on convex, or outward, curves that permit the edges to spread.
Directions:
1)  Hold scissor points just short of seamline to avoid cutting past the stitching, and cut in slit in the seam allowance.  1/16 inch away from seam, and the maximum distance apart is 3/8 to inch.
2)  When clips and notches face one another, as in a princess seam, they should be staggered to avoid weakening seam.

Notching
Notching (also called wedging) is used on curved seams to allow them to lie smooth.  Notches are wedges cut from seam allowance of concave, or inward, curves; space opened by removal of fabric lets edge draw in.
Directions:
1)  Hold scissor points just short of seam line to avoid cutting past the stitching, and cut a small wedge in the seam allowance.  1/16 inch away from seam, and the maximum distance apart is 3/8 to inch.
2)  When clips and notches face one another, as in a princess seam, they should be staggered to avoid weakening seam.
23  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing in General: Discussion and Questions / BASIC SEWING TECHNIQUES (Tutorials) on: July 07, 2005 04:21:37 PM
I really didn't know where to put this.  I plan on locking this topic, so if you have question, or comments please PM me with them.  Anyways, hopefully these will help out all of my fellow craftsters.

Seam Allowance Techniques
  Trimming
  Grading
  Clipping
  Notching

Hand-Stitching Techniques
  Slip-Stitch
  Blind-Hem Stitch
  Catch-Stitch
  French Hand-Rolled Hem

Seam Techniques
  Plain Seam
  Corded or Piped Seam
  Flat-Felled Seam
  False Flat-Felled Seam
  French Seam
  Mock French Seam
  Gathered Seam

Seam Finishing Techniques
  Bias-Bound
  Hong Kong
  Net-Bound
  Zigzagged
  Pinked

Zipper Closure Techniques
  Centered Zipper
  Lapped Zipper
  Invisible Zipper
  Fly-Front Zipper

Buttons and Buttonholes, Velcro Techniques
  Buttonholes
  Flat Buttons
  Shank Buttons
  Velcro

Miscellaneous
  Pre-Shrinking Fabrics
 
24  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Re: throw and cushion on: July 07, 2005 03:30:07 PM
Hope this helps with your re-vamp.

Duvet Cover Tutorial
  http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=42495
Pillow Sham Tutorial
  http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=42496
Pillow Cases Tutorial
  http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=42498
Throw Pillow Tutorial
  http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=42499
Shower Curtain Tutorial
  http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=42500
25  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Shower Curtain Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:28:17 PM
How to Make Shower Curtains

1.  Measure Opening
A standard shower curtain measures 72" X 72". For the finished curtain width, measure the length of your curtain rod.  For the finished curtain length, measure from the rod to approximately half way down the sides of the tub.

2.  Cut Each Panel
Because the width of a standard sized curtain exceeds the width of the fabric, two panels of fabric will need to be sewn together to create one wide curtain. For a balanced effect, allow one whole panel in the center and split the remaining panel on either side.

3.  Sew Panels Together
With right sides of fabric facing, pin and stitch side panels to either side of center panel.  Press seams open and finish edges.

4.  Hem Curtain Sides
Turn up and press 8" on upper/lower edge of curtain. Tuck in cut edge to meet crease and press again creating a  4" double thickness hem. Top-stitch through all layers of fabric along inside fold.  Turn up and press 4" on side edges of curtain. Tuck in cut edge to meet crease and press again creating a 2" double thickness hem. Top-stitch through all layers of fabric along inside fold.

5.  Buttonholes Header
To accommodate the 12 decorative rings, you will need to make 12 buttonholes.  Mark the location of each opening. Each mark on the right side of the curtain should measure 1" from the finished top edge of the curtain. The first and last mark should measure 3" from the finished side edge of the curtain and the remaining 10 openings should measure 6" between each.

Calculate Fabric for a 72" x 72" Curtain
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
1.  Add 1" to the width for allowance of the two seams joining the side panels to the center, and 8" for the side hems, and add 18" to the desired length.
2.  Take your adjusted width measurement and subtract the width of the Fabric that you are planning to use (either 45" or 60"). 
3.  Divide the remaining number in half and you have the width for the two side panels to sew to the center panel.

Example:   
1.  Shower Curtain:  72" by 72"
2.  Add seam allowances and hem allowances:  81" by 88"
3.  Subtract fabric width from adjusted width:  (45" width)36"  (60" width)21"
4.  Divide in half:  (45" width)18"  (60"width)10.5"

45" Cut: (1)45" x 88"    (2)21" x 88"       
60" Cut: (1)60" x 88"    (2)60" x 10.5"
26  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Throw Pillow Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:26:26 PM
How to Make Throw Pillows

1.  Measure Pillow Form
Measure the length and width of your pillow form along the sewn edges and jot down the dimensions

2.  Choose Fabric, and Pre-shrink
Check the cleaning instructions on the end of the bolt of fabric before purchasing. If you intend to wash the pillow cover, you must pre-shrink the fabric.
 
3.  Cut Pillow Front Piece
To create the front of the pillow cover, cut one piece of fabric the same size as the pillow form. Because the fabric should fit snugly over the pillow form, this measurement includes a 1/2 inch seam allowance. If the pillow form is very firm, it may be necessary to add 1 inch to both the length and width of the pillow.

4.  Cut Pillow Back Pieces
To create the back of the pillow cover, cut one piece of fabric the same width as the front piece of the pillow and 4 inches longer than the length of the pillow front. Fold the piece in half lengthwise and cut along the fold. Turn this edge, which measures the same as the width of the pillow, under 1/4 inch and press, turn under again and stitch 1/16" from fold to secure. Repeat with the other back piece.  You  may want to simply cut the back piece of fabric exactly the same size as the front. This pillow cover will require a centered zipper closure if you want a removable cover.

6.  Stitch Front to Back
With right sides together, lay one half of the pillow back on the pillow front and pin in place. Pin the other half of the pillow back in place. The two pillow backs will overlap each other by 1 1/2 inches. Stitch the back and front together using a 1/2" seam allowance.  If the back of your pillow is a single piece of fabric, sew as directed, but leave an opening and add a centered zipper on that side on the pillow.

7.  Trim Excess
Trim the excess fabric from the corners.

8.  Turn Cover to Right Side   
Turn the pillow cover right side out and insert the pillow form.
27  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Pillow Cases Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:25:19 PM
How to Make Pillow Cases

1.  Fabric Preparation   Trim fabrics to the following sizes:
Main Fabric:      
  Standard:  26" x 41"
  Queen:  30" x 41"
  King:  36" x 41"
Contrast Fabric:  10" x 41"
Trim Fabric:  1 1/2" x 41"

2.  Pin Fabrics Together
Press trim fabric in half lengthwise.   Spread main fabric right side up, with one of the 26" edge nearest you.  Place trim along the right hand 42" edge of your main fabric.  All raw edges should line up and face out. Layer your contrast fabric next, matching cut edges.  Pin in place, making sure to catch all layers.

3.  Sew Together
Sew all three fabrics together using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Spread out fabric right side up, lightly iron, pressing your seam toward the contrast fabric.

4.  Stitch Contrasting Fabric in Place
Turn raw edge of contrasting fabric toward the wrong side, 1/2" and press creating a crisp crease.  Turn half remaining width of contrast to wrong side, coving the seam allowance (about 1/8" extended past stitching line); press.  Pin to hold in place.  Turn pillowcase right side out.  Top-stitch along the edge of the contrast seam (on right side), being sure to catch folded edge of contrast that was turned/pinned to wrong side.

5.  Pin Side Seams
Fold your fabric in half right sides out, with the contrast and trim on the right side.  Pin around the open ended side and bottom.

6.  Sew a French Seam
Sew 1/4" seam with the right sides facing out, trim seam allowance to half of the width.  Turn pillowcase so the seam in now on the inside of the pillowcase, and the right sides of the fabric are facing each other.  Push the seam all the way to the outside, and pin in place, press if necessary.  Sew another 1/4" seam to enclose the first 1/4" seam.  Turn right sides out, and press seams.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Main Fabric:  Pillow width x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.
Contrast Fabric:  10" x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.
Trim Fabric:  1 1/2" x pillow height, multiplied by 2, with 1" added to the doubled total.



How To Make Housewife Pillow Cases
Plain pillow cases, known as housewife pillow cases, are very easy to make. They are cut in one piece from across the width of the fabric.  The fabric is hemmed at each side, folded and stitched with an overlapping flap at the back to hold the pillow in place. This simple style gives a crisp look on any bed.

1.  Cut Fabric
(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard Size (20" by 26"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 60" wide by 21" high.
Queen Size (20" by 30"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 68" wide by 21" high.
King Size (20" by 36"):  Cut one piece of fabric measuring 80" wide by 21" high.

2.  Hem Sides
Turn under a double 1/2" hem at one end of the fabric. Stitch and press.  At the opposite end turn under a double 2" hem. Stitch and press.

3.  Mark 6""From Hem
Place the fabric on a flat surface, wrong side up, and mark a line with pins 6" from the end with the small hem.

4.  Fold in Edges
Fold the end with the large hem to this mark, and pin in place.  Fold the end with the small hem over the top and past the edge of the large hem by 2".  Pin the side seams.

5.  Stitch Side Seams
Stitch both side seams through all thicknesses using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Trim seam allowance to half of the width.

6.  Turn and Press
Turn wrong side out and press, stitch both side seams through all thicknesses using a 1/4" seam allowance.  Turn right side out and press.  Place the pillow inside the pillow case and tuck it under the flap to secure.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Cut one piece of fabric measuring width of pillow with 8" added x height of pillow with 1" added.
28  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Pillow Sham Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:23:17 PM
How to Make Pillow Shams

1.   Measure Pillow
To determine the size pillow you own, measure the length of your bed pillow and jot down the dimension: Standard size pillows measure approximately 26" wide, queen size pillows measure approximately 30" wide, and king size pillows measure approximately 36" wide.

2.   Cut Sham
On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed fabric design to be identical for each pillow sham front.

To make one sham
Cut 1 sham front:(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard(20"x 26"): 30" high X 36" wide Queen(20"x 30"): 30" high X 40" wide King(20" x 36"): 30" high X 46" wide

Cut 2 Sham backs:
(includes 1/2" seam allowance)
Standard: 30" high X 28" wide Queen: 30" high X 32" wide King: 30" high X 38" wide

3.   Hem Sham Backs
Turn under 8" and press to wrong side of fabric along inside vertical edge of each sham back. Open out crease, tuck the cut edge into the fold and press a 4" double hem. Pin and top stitch hem through all layers along inside fold.

4.   Stitch Front to Back
Place sham front right side up, flat on table. With right sides facing, place one sham back into position over front sham with top, bottom and side cut edges even - hemmed edge should be facing center. Pin and stitch front to backs along all outside edges through all layers. Trim seam, clip corners, turn to right side through back opening, press sham flat.

5.   Stitch Flange
On right side of sham, measure and mark a 4" border along all outside edges. Pin and top stitch through all layers of the sham along the marked border. Insert pillow through opening in back.

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Pillow Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
For Sham Front: Pillow dimensions plus 10" (Cut one)
For Sham Backs: Same height as calculated front measurement, Subtract 8" from the calculated width measurement.  (Cut two)
29  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Duvet Cover Tutorial on: July 07, 2005 02:21:31 PM
How to Make Duvet Covers

1.  Measure Duvet
Measure the length and width of your duvet and jot down the dimensions.

2.   Cut Panels (for duvets 53" or narrower.)
For duvet widths that measure less than your fabric width, cut the intended length of fabric crosswise into 2 lengths (one for the cover top and one for the cover bottom). On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the selvage edge. The 2 lengths may not be equal in length but the identical print area of each panel will be the same length and must measure at least 1 1/2" longer than the measured duvet.

3.   Cut and Assemble Panels
(for duvets 54" or wider.)
For duvet widths that exceed your fabric width, cut the intended length of fabric crosswise into 4 lengths (two for the top cover and two for the bottom cover). On print or plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the selvage edge. The 4 lengths may not be equal in length but the identical print area of all the panels will be the same length and must measure at least 1 1/2" longer than the measured duvet.

For the top of the cover, sew two of the panels of fabric together before cutting the cover to size. For a balanced effect, split the second panel in half lengthwise and stitch it to each side of the center panel. On print of plaid fabrics, note the pattern repeat and match the printed design at the seams. Press seams open. For the bottom of the cover, split and stitch the 3rd and 4th panel together  in the same fashion.
 
4.   Cut Duvet Cover to Size
From the panels, cut the width to equal the measured duvet width plus 1 1/2". Cut the length to equal the measured duvet length plus 1 1/2". Cut 1 cover top and 1 cover bottom. The top and bottom of the cover are identical. On print or plaid fabrics, measure within the identical print area. For seamed panels (larger covers) cut from the center area.

5.   Stitch Cover
With all cut edges even and right sides facing, pin and stitch together the top and bottom of the cover along the 2 side edges and the foot edge - using a 1/2" seam allowance. Press open all seams. Turn the cover to the right side through the head opening and press flat along all stitched edges.

6.   Hem Cover
Turn under 1" and press a crease to wrong side of fabric along head edge on top cover and bottom cover separately. Open out crease, tuck the cut edge into the fold and press a 1/2" double hem along top edge. Pin and top stitch through all layers along inside fold.

7.   Stitch Hems Together
With hemmed edges even, measure and mark the head edge of the cover 12" to 15" from each side seam. Pin the edges together and top stitch the top cover to the bottom cover through all layers from the mark to the side seam using the hem stitching as your guide. Backstitch securely at the ends of the stitching leaving the head of the cover open in the center.

8.   Mark Tie Placement
Pairs of fabric ties will be positioned in the opening at the hemmed edge of the cover. Spacing evenly, mark the placement of the ties beginning at each end of the opening and allowing approximately a 12" space between each mark. On the inside of the cover, mark both the top and bottom. You will need to make 1 tie for each placement.

9.   Assemble Tie Closures
The cutting dimensions of each tie closure measures 13" long X 3" wide. Measure and draw a tissue paper pattern following these dimensions. Using your iron, fold end edges inward 1/2" (wrong sides together), press flat.  Next press it in half lengthwise, like a hot dog (wrong sides out.)  Open what you just pressed, and press the seam allowance edges in towards the center crease on both sides.  Press the two folded edges together, making sure that they match in width.  Pin if necessary.  Stitch 1/16" from the folded edges to secure.  Repeat for remaining ties.

10.   Position Tie Closures
Pin a pair of ties (one to the top cover and one to the bottom cover) to the inside of the duvet cover opening at each placement marking. Stitch and backstitch securely through each tie end using the hem stitching on the cover as a guide. Insert the duvet in cover and tie opening closed.

*Instead of ties for the closures you could try buttons and buttonholes, velcro, or even a zipper.

*To help your duvet stay put (and not bunch up in the middle of the cover) you can sew loops of elastic into the seam allowances of the corners on the duvet corner, and sew buttons onto the corners of your duvet; or sew a length of ribbon (10" folded in half) into the seam allowances of the corners on the duvet cover, and sew another length of ribbon onto the corners of your duvet.
   

Calculate Fabric From Your Own Duvet Measurements
(includes 1/2" seam allowances)
Because there is not standard sizes for duvets I have created this easy way to calculate what you should cut for your pieced duvet cover.  If you plan on using a sheet (and therefore do not need to piece together fabric, just add 1 1/2" to the measurements of your duvet.
1.  Measure the length and width of your duvet along the sewn edges and jot down the dimensions.
2.  Add allowances for seams, add 3" to the width, and 3" to the length.
3.  Take your width measurement and subtract the width of the Fabric that you are planning to use (either 45" or 60"). 
4.  Divide the remaining number in half and you have the width for the two side panels to sew to the center panel.

Example:   
1.  Duvet cover:  66" by 96"
2.  Add seam allowances:  68" by 99"
3.  Subtract fabric 45" from width seam allowances:  23"
4.  Divide in half:  11.5"

Cut:  (1) 45" by 99"    (2) 11.5" by 99
30  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / Re: Cant afford blinds on: July 07, 2005 11:30:15 AM
make your own curtains, and put them on those extendable rods (you know what i'm taking about right)  you can find curtain patterns at www.alternative-windows.com 
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 27


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