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541  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Euro Pro 8260 - does ANYONE own this machine besides me? on: November 06, 2008 10:22:24 AM
Your Euro Pro uses snap on feet, correct??

If so, the there is a part that 'grabs' the little bar on the snap-on foot.  This part is called the ankle.  As you sit in front of the machine (as if you were going to sew), on the left side of the ankle there is a screw.  Turn it counter clockwise and remove the screw and the ankle.  

Now, take the screw and use it to install the zipper foot so that it looks like this on the machine.
The screw on the back of the foot can be loosened so that the foot can be moved and positioned on either side of the needle

Hope this helps
542  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: I need help, my brain hurts. White 455 on: November 05, 2008 12:42:53 PM
Do you have the needle inserted and threaded correctly?

The White model 455 is very similar to the White model 565 that I reviewed on my blog.
Both machines need to have the needle inserted with the FLAT side to the RIGHT and the thread must go through the needle from the left side toward the right.

When I got the 565, It was out of adjustment.  The needle bar was not properly centered and the hook clearance was off. But, even with these issue, it did make a stitch.  Once everything was in proper adjustment, the machine was really quite nice.

There is a free threading diagram for the 455 here.
543  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Help needed URGENT! on: November 05, 2008 09:49:46 AM
Try contacting Janome directly (Janome.com) and see if they can help you hunt down a replacemnt manual.  If and when you find one, but it in a large envelope or plastic zip-top bag and tape the bag to the inside of the sewing machine case.

544  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Help needed URGENT! on: November 05, 2008 07:43:59 AM
I take it that you don't have a manual?  If you don't find a swicth or lever either on the far (back) side of the machine in the area behind the bobbin or in the front part of the machine near the bobbin, chances are pretty good that your model may require a feed cover plate and the dogs don't drop.   If so, just set the stitch length to zero and give it a try that way.
545  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Reccommend Away: Looking for a Computerized Machine! on: November 05, 2008 04:55:15 AM
Hello all!

Hated it. Couldn't go three stitches without birdsnesting whatever made.

Troubleshooting Thread Nests on the Underside of the Fabric:
 
Thread nests on the underside of your fabric are almost always the direct result of improper threading or a problem in the thread path or upper tension.

Let's first look at what is actually happening in the stitch formation process to cause these wads of thread. Ideally, the thread should form a neat coil (stitch) in the "center" of your fabric. When you get these thread wads on the underside, that is telling you that for some reason, the upper thread is NOT pulling up the bobbin thread and forming that snug, balanced stitch.

Here is the recommended check list for solving this problem

I've had a chance to play with a few of the Husky machines. The ones made in Taiwan (likely by Janome) were pretty decent machines, but the ones I've played with that were made in China- not so much.

As far as a computerized machine- go to some dealers, and try some out.  Be aware that many of the under $500 computerized machines don't have adjustable presser foot pressure.  This feature would come into play when sewing knits, very thick or bulky items or very delicate fabrics, but for "typical" sewing situations, the factory setting on the nonadjustable presser foot pressure will do just fine.


Sears used to have a very liberal return policy like Walmart, but because of customers using the ability to return as a type of free rental service, Sears now has a 15% restocking fee on all electronics and sewing machines.  If the machine is defective, they will let you exchange it for another within the return period, but if you just don't want it, be prepared to pay the 15%.  If you want to try the machines at Sears go there when they are NOT busy, bring supplies, and make arrangements with a manager.  It isn't always easy to accomplish, but some folks have had some success in doing this. BTW, thecurrent line-up of Kenmore sewing machines are made by Janome, and often garner favorable reviews from owners. 
546  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: So you want to learn how to sew on a machine? A beginners checklist on: November 03, 2008 03:26:45 PM
Below is a link to a PDF from Threads magazine call "Drivers' Ed for Sewing Machines".  I've given a copy of it to every new sewist I know.

http://www.taunton.com/promotions/pdf/Threads_DriversEd.pdf
 
547  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Brother CS 6000i? on: November 03, 2008 03:14:28 PM
I've used the Brother CS6000i.  My mother used to own it, but now she has another machine.

There are a few things to be aware of with this machine.

1.)  It is not a full sized machine.  It is very compact which is great for a travel machine, but not so great for sewing larger or bulkier items.

2.)  It's very light weight.  Again, this is great for a travel machine, but it's lack of heft causes it to bounce around at higher speeds.

3.) It has a nice selection of features and stitch patterns

4.) It really feels "plasticky" and is 'value engineered'.  At the $200 price point, I think that most buyers understand that this is the type of machine that you don't invest money into having serviced or repaired.  After all, just a routine maintenance/service on a computerized machine will cost anywhere from $70 to $120, depending on where you live.  Repairs can run even more.  This makes it more of a disposable machine. 

So, if you want a nice variety of decorative stitches and features, don't mind a small machine, understand that it's value engineered, and need something close to $200, then this one fits the bill. 
548  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Kenmore machine-can't even turn the wheel: not worth the repair costs? on: November 03, 2008 05:43:58 AM
Sears is going to quote you about $80 to look at it, that is why I suggested a local shop.  After 10 years, pretty much eveything but the frame is out of warranty. 

Since there are so many inexpensive, new sewing machines on the market these days, many people don't ever have their machine professionally maintained, serviced or repaired.  They just look at it as a disposable item.  And getting the covers off of many of the new machines just to service them can be much like solving a Rubik's cube puzzle block, especially for the average owner. I often wonder if this is intentional on the part of the designers.

I hope you get it all sorted out.

549  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Bobbin trouble with old Singer (model 347)? on: November 03, 2008 05:03:19 AM
Ah....the dreaded thread nests and wads on the underside!

Want to know hwy that happened?

Thread nests on the underside of your fabric are almost always the direct results of improper threading or a problem in the thread path or upper tension.

Let's first look at what is actually happening in the stitch formation process to cause these wads of thread.  Ideally, the thread should form a neat coil (stitch) in the "center" of your fabric. When you get these thread wads on the underside, that is telling you that for some reason, the upper thread is NOT pulling up the bobbin thread and forming that snug, balanced stitch.....

Here is the recommended check list for solving this problem

550  SEWING IN GENERAL / Sewing Machines: Discussion and Questions / Re: Kenmore machine-can't even turn the wheel: not worth the repair costs? on: November 03, 2008 04:44:07 AM
Often a local repair shop will give you a free estimate of the repairs needed.  If it hasn't been serviced in 10 years, it might just need some oil internally.

Also, did you check to see if you have any thread bits stuck in the bobbin area?

Take out the bobbin case, and clean in that area as per the instructions in your manual. It's possible that all you have is some thread nests or wads in there.  If so, here is why that happened andwhat you can do about it.
http://blog.sew-classic.com/2008/09/27/thread-nests-and-wads-on-the-underside-how-to-fix-it.aspx

-Jenny
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