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1  Mug and French Press Jacket in Knitting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: July 16, 2007 07:51:27 PM


Mug & French Press Jacket

Size:  to fit a mug or French press with 3.5" diameter base; pattern can be adjusted to fit different sizes.
Materials:
Yarn: 1 skein Elann Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight 100% Peruvian wool, 109 yds/50g).  You may need more than one skein, depending on how high you want the sides to be.
Yarn subs: A smooth worsted weight yarn with good stitch definition and a little bounce; suggested subs include Cascade 220, Cascade Sierra, Plymouth Encore worsted, Brown Sheep Lamb's Pride Worsted, Southwest Trading Co. Karaoke.
Needles: US 6 (or size to get gauge), 1 set dpns or two circs [dpns or 2 circs for base, 1 circ for sides (sides are worked flat but with built-in base, the flexibility of a circ is important)]
Gauge: 24 sts/32 rows = 4"/10cm
Notions: buttons (1 for mug, 2 for French press), tapestry needle

Basic concept:
Knit a circle from the center out large enough for base (80 sts).  Work sides for 1 or up to base of handle.  BO 2 or enough for width of handle.  Work in desired pattern (e.g. smocked cables) for about 3 or desired height.  BO all sts.  Make a loop closure and sew to one open side, sew button to opposite side (two for the French press)
Variations: replace smocked pattern with plain ribbing, replace smocked pattern with stranded colorwork and bands of ribbing or moss st at top and bottom

SMOCKING STITCH
(from Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns)
Multiple of 8 sts + 2
Rows 1 and 3 (wrong side): k2, *p2, k2*
Row 2: p2, *k2, p2*
Row 4: p2, *insert right-hand needle from front between 6th and 7th sts on left-hand needle and draw through a loop; sl this loop onto left-hand needle and knit it together with the 1st st on left hand needle; k1, p2, k2, p2*
Rows 5 and 7: Repeat rows 1 and 3
Row 6: repeat row 2
Row 8: p2, k2, p2, *draw loop from between 6th and 7th sts as before and knit it together with 1st st, then k1, p2, k2, p2*, end k2, p2
Repeat rows 1 - 8



JACKET PATTERN
BASE
kfb = knit into front and back of stitch
inc 1 = increase one = for this pattern, I prefer k1 into row below
With dpns or 2 circs, CO 8 sts.
Round 1: *kfb* (16 sts)
Round 2: *k2, inc 1* (24 sts)
Round 3: *inc 1, k3* (32 sts)
Round 4: *k4, inc 1* (40 sts)
Round 5: *inc 1, k5* (48 sts)
Round 6: *k6, inc 1* (56 sts)
Round 7: *inc 1, k7* (64 sts)
Round 8: *k8, inc 1* (72 sts)
Round 9: *inc 1, k9* (80 sts)
Round 10: p all sts (80 sts)

SIDES
Round 1 - 7: *k2, p2* (80 sts)
In the next round, switch from dpns or 2 circs to 1 circ
Round 8:  BO 6 sts, sl1, p1, begin smocking pattern, end p2
Next 24 or so rows : work smocking pattern.  On RS rows, replace first two sts of smocking pattern with sl1(purlwise), p1, and end the row with p2.  On WS rows, replace first two sts of smocking pattern with  sl1(knitwise), k1, and end the row with k2.
Note: work last smocked row when sides are 1" shorter than desired, then work last 8 rows in 2x2 rib.  The mug used 2.5 repeats of the smocking pattern; the French press will probably use about 4.5 repeats.
BO all sts in pattern

LOOP: (for French press, make 2)
With dpns, CO 3 sts
Rows 1 - 28: work i-cord
BO

FINISHING
Exact placement and position of loop and button will vary depending on the design of the mug/French press.

Slip jacket onto mug or French press.  Pin ends of loop to one of the open sides and determine placement for button on opposite open side (French press will likely need two loops and buttons).   Slip jacket off and sew loop and button into place.  Weave in all ends.  To block, wash gently and then slip onto mug or French press to dry, turning mug or french press upside down.  If you are using a French press with metal components, you may wish to wrap it in a plastic bag or plastic wrap first to keep the metal dry.

Pattern is for personal use only, please!  First published on my personal blog under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

CORRECTIONS made August 10, 2007, to instructions for sides beginning "Next 24 or so rows." 

CORRECTIONS made September 30, 2007 to instructions for base beginning Round 2 on.
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2  Crochet Coffee Cup Cozy (16 oz) with tute in Crochet: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: June 18, 2007 02:17:19 PM


More of a recipe than a pattern:
For a 16 oz. takeout cup:
With worsted weight yarn and a G hook, chain 30.  Join into a ring and hdc into each chain.  Increase 2 sts every other round (e.g. inc 1, hdc 12, inc 1, hdc rem), checking the fit every once in a while, working a plain round to tighten it up if necessary. I like a cozy about 6 rounds high.  Stretchy yarns like wool need fewer increase rounds - increasing 2 sts every third round might do the trick.  If you want it to fit lower, start with a shorter foundation chain. 

On the left: Blue Sky Alpacas Dyed cotton in expresso, lemonade, honeydew, and sky.  On the right, unidentified scrap wool in pink, Blue Sky Alpacas Dyed Cotton in poppy orange. 

I gave one as a small thank-you gift to a barista who makes me awesome dirty chai lattes (chai latte with a shot of espresso).  Barista was delighted, showed it around, people made many positive comments on it.  I need to remember not to downplay my skills - sure, it's something I just whipped up with scrap yarn and an empty takeout cup...but I don't have to say that.  I can just smile and say thank you.
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3  Re: Organ-along! in Craftalongs by mk_carroll on: May 28, 2007 11:31:22 PM

Knitty's Womb

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4  handspun = hat with heart (top-down beanie recipe included) in Knitting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: February 11, 2007 12:06:01 AM
Just in time for Valentine's!





The hat was knit on size 13 dpns with a handspun thick/thin yarn and the heart patch was crocheted with a size K hook and handspun yarn (all yarn from Terra Bella Spun). 

For the heart, I checked out some crochet patterns from the Crochet Pattern Central Free Heart Crochet Pattern Links and worked up one that was either a coaster or a potholder; I'm not sure which - I modified the pattern a bit too.

Top-down ribbed beanie recipe:
The idea here is to knit a square by using double increases and staggering the placement every other round.  When the square is big enough, you just knit around and wind up with a circular hat!
Use any yarn you like with appropriate sized needles.  I prefer using a set of 5 dpns, although you could modify this pattern with stitch markers if you prefer one circ or two circs (in round 1, *k2, pm* should do it).
With dpns, CO 8 sts (2 sts on each dpn)
round 1) knit into the back of each st
round 2) work 1 double increase at the beginning of each dpn (I used m1, k1, m1), k to end of needle, repeat on each dpn.
round 3) *k1, p1*
round 4) *k1, p1* to last st on needle and work 1 double increase.  Repeat on each dpn.
round 5) *k1, p1*
Repeat rounds 2 - 5 until the top will fit the size you want.
A rough way to figure this out is to measure across the center (side to side, not diagonally) and multiply that by 4 to get the perimeter (which will become the circumference of the finished beanie).  For a ribbed beanie, if you want a snug fit, go for something about an inch less than the circumference of the head.  If you want a more exact fit, slip all stitches to a long piece of scrap yarn, placing markers to separate the stitches from each needle, and try it on.  To be really sure, wash and dry it before trying it on, just in case the yarn will shrink or expand a lot.

Once it is big enough to fit around, work *k1, p1* around until it's the length you want, and bind off.  I try to bind off a little loosely; you could use a bind-off specifically for ribbings, like tubular bind-off.

*edited to correct an error in taking the measurement*
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5  70 yds of handspun = beanie! (tute included) in Knitting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: December 11, 2006 08:06:31 PM


One small skein of handdyed, handspun, thick-and-thin yarn (from Lime & Violet), US 13 dpns, and a movie.  Because I wasn't sure how much yarn I needed, I started this from the top down, increased until it was big enough, and then stopped increasing and just worked around until it was long enough.  It's on the big, soft, floppy side.  The rosettes were crocheted with leftover bits of more handdyed/handspun yarn and then sewn on.

Top-down ribbed beanie recipe:
The idea here is to knit a square by using double increases and staggering the placement every other round.  When the square is big enough, you just knit around and wind up with a circular hat! 
Use any yarn you like with appropriate sized needles.  I prefer using a set of 5 dpns, although you could modify this pattern with stitch markers if you prefer one circ or two circs (in round 1, *k2, pm* should do it).
With dpns, CO 8 sts (2 sts on each dpn)
round 1) knit into the back of each st
round 2) work 1 double increase at the beginning of each dpn (I used m1, k1, m1), k to end of needle, repeat on each dpn.
round 3) *k1, p1*
round 4) *k1, p1* to last st on needle and work 1 double increase.  Repeat on each dpn.
round 5) *k1, p1*
Repeat rounds 2 - 5 until the top will fit the size you want. 
A rough way to figure this out is to measure across the center (side to side, not diagonally) and multiply that by 4 to get the perimeter (which will become the circumference of the finished beanie).  For a ribbed beanie, if you want a snug fit, go for something about an inch less than the circumference of the head.  If you want a more exact fit, slip all stitches to a long piece of scrap yarn, placing markers to separate the stitches from each needle, and try it on.  To be really sure, wash and dry it before trying it on, just in case the yarn will shrink or expand a lot. 

Once it is big enough to fit around, work *k1, p1* around until it's the length you want, and bind off.  I try to bind off a little loosely; you could use a bind-off specifically for ribbings, like tubular bind-off.

*edited to correct an error in taking the measurement*
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6  Neckwarmer made with handspun/handdyed yarn in Knitting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: December 11, 2006 07:16:43 PM


What to do with 70 yards of one-of-a-kind thick-and-thin handspun wool?  In this case, I used a circular US 11 needle, cast on about 50 stitches, and started knitting.  I did alternating rows with SWTC Karaoke (soysilk/wool, color lavender rose) because I wasn't sure I'd have enough, and knit until it was 4.5 inches wide (it's about 25 inches long).  I did simple buttonholes at one end, throwing them in randomly (there are 8 total).  I had enough left over to crochet up 8 rosettes, four of which are on the neckwarmer here, and I used a little leftover Cascade 220 for the leaves.  The big one is just decoration, and the small ones are buttons.  With the 8 buttonholes to choose from, this will fit most adults.
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7  Basic Beanie for Blythe and Pullip dolls in Knitting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: October 09, 2006 10:11:37 PM


Tools & Materials
1 set double-pointed knitting needles, size US#5 or size to get gauge
1 set double-pointed knitting needles, size US#4 or one size smaller than size to get gauge
tapestry needle
A few yards of light worsted weight yarn (beanie in photo knit with Karabella Aurora Melange, color 006)
 
Gauge
5.5 sts/8rows = 1" stockinette stitch in the round

Pattern
This beanie is knit from the top down on double-pointed needles.  A variation done flat is on my blog.
For inc 1 (increase one stitch), I prefer to knit one into the row below.  Use what you prefer - make 1, yarn forward, and knit front and back are all good choices.  The pattern of increases will give straight spoke increases.

With larger needles, CO 8 sts.
1) k all (8 sts)
2) *k1, inc 1* (16 sts)
3) k all
4) *inc 1, k2* (24 sts)
5) k all
6) *k3, inc 1* (32)
7) k all
8] *inc 1, k4* (40)
9) k all
10) *k5, inc 1* (48)
11) k all
12) *inc 1, k6* (56)
13) k all
Blythe: skip to round 15
14) *k7, inc 1* (64)
15 - 26) k all
begin brim: use ribbing or other stitch pattern which will not roll.
Switch to smaller needles.
27 - 32) *k1, p1*
Blythe: BO
Pullip: if you would like a shorter beanie as shown in the photo, BO
33 - 37) continue working in pattern *k1, p1* for longer beanie

Weave in ends. 
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8  Basic Beanie for Pullip doll (will also fit Blythe) in Crochet: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: July 06, 2006 10:22:52 PM

A simple crocheted beanie for a Pullip doll, using a sportweight yarn. This was a really quick project, one that's going to be easy to fancy up with appliques, ear flaps, pompons, all that sort of thing. This will also fit a Blythe doll - if you want a tighter fit on a Blythe, skip one or two rounds of increases.

Don't crochet?  Wish you could knit one?  knit pattern is here!

I used:
Peace Fleece "DK" sportweight, olive roots
crochet hook C/2-2.75mm (next time I might go up a hook size and do one less round of increases)

Make a slip knot loop and sc 6 sts into the loop; tighten loop.
begin increases
1) 2 hdc into each st (12)
2) *1 hdc, inc 1* (18)
3) *2 hdc, inc 1* (24)
4) *3 hdc, inc 1* (30)
5) *4 hdc, inc 1* (36)
6) *5 hdc, inc 1* (42)
Stop increasing. Start checking the fit after row 10 to get the length you want.
7 - 13) hdc ea st
done!
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9  Re: block for "quilts for katrina" flickr project in Quilting: Completed Projects by mk_carroll on: September 23, 2005 09:29:06 PM
Whoops, started a new thread before I found this one!

My appliqued and embroidered contribution:
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10  Re: knitty and crochetme rant! (you were warned . . .) in Crochet: Discussion and Questions by mk_carroll on: September 15, 2005 06:41:30 PM
i guess i never thought of a shrug that way; thanks for the suggestion! another question: what about shoulder shaping? and for the tube top, too, how can I shape it so I can get it over my head (or hips) and have it still stay up?
Tube top: To be able to get it on easily, a laced-up or buttoned closure will make it easier - to put it on, wrap it around yourself or open the laces up far enough.  To keep it up, willpower and double-stick tape may help, which is true of just about any tube top, really.  Cascade Fixation, which Croshayqueen uses in some of her very sexy patterns, is a really stretchy yarn, and Sock it To Me! Esprit is another one.  Play with a swatch of this; if making a tube tob, you'll be making it smaller than your actual body measurement: say your bust is 34", you may make the top so it is 32".  This is what is called "negative ease" in fitting. Another way to make it stretchy is use a crochet ribbing stitch - working it from one short side to the other, half-double or double crochet into only the back (or front, just be consistent) loop of each stitch. If you are very busty, I advise straps.  Easy to do - put on the tube top, figure out where you want the straps to be, mark with safety pins, then take off the top and add the straps.  You could put two in the front and tie them at the back of the neck, or two at the front and two at the back, then tie them over each shoulder.

shoulder shaping: the most basic shrug doesn't have that; the unsewn middle section of the rectangle forms the back.  Use a fairly stretchy stitch pattern and it will wrap around your shoulders without extra help.  If you want to get into basic shaping with this project, draw out a rectangle and write down measurements.  This is your schematic (using graph paper can help make it easier if you think of each block as a stitch/row).  You will start crocheting at one of the short ends, which will be the cuff of the first sleeve.  Make sure that the rectangle will be wide enough so that you can fit your arm through when the fabric is folded in half, and write down the length that you want the sleeve to be.  You will crochet up to that point, and then if you want a little extra fabric to go up over your shoulders and the back of your neck, you'll increase a few stitches on one side of the rectangle.  If you want the shoulder/collar section to be 3 inches wide, figure out how many more stitches (using your gauge) you need to add.  For an example, let's say your gauge is 3 stitches per inch and 3 rows per inch.  You need to add 9 stitches.  If you want a gradual, slanted increase, spread the increases out over a few rows - on the first increase row, increase 3 stitches on the side that you want the collar to be on.  Crochet a row with no increases.  On the row after that, increase 3 more.  Repeat until you have increased by 9 stitches.  That's going to take 6 rows, which with your gauge is 2 inches, so take that into account with your calculations, and two inches before you need the increases to end and the second sleeve to begin, start decreasing in the same way that you were increasing: on the collar side, decrease 3 stitches on alternate rows.  When you are done decreasing, work the second sleeve in the same way as the first.  I've done a very rough schematic below to give you an idea of what you'll be doing.

Have fun, keep learning, and show us what you come up with! 

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