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1  POTTERY, CERAMICS, POLYMER CLAY / Pottery, Ceramics, etc: Completed Projects / glaze on: July 27, 2008 08:20:08 AM
Thank you!

It's just a brown clay (cone 5 / B-3 brown from laguna) with oddly enough a green glaze (laguna's cone 5 forest green) that looks blue when applied heavy on this clay. Poured the inside & dipped the rim.  The brown glaze is laguna's mojave dusk.  I did a few glaze tests before I picked those.

You could paint the dark clay on as slip to get the same effect I suppose.
2  POTTERY, CERAMICS, POLYMER CLAY / Pottery, Ceramics, etc: Completed Projects / Glaze! on: July 25, 2008 04:11:46 PM
Some glazed!






3  POTTERY, CERAMICS, POLYMER CLAY / Pottery, Ceramics, etc: Completed Projects / Re: ceramic human heart and tree stump teapots on: July 14, 2008 09:39:16 PM
Wow.

I have to stay I'm glad I came back to look at these (my server didn't want to load it the first few times I tried).  Both are really spectacular. The wood grain design is very pretty on its own - but taken with the overall design & other details - it's one facet of a well crafted piece.  The heart is excellent as well. Though I admire the heart more as sculpture - and the fact that its a vessel is a secondary surprise. Whereas the stump teapot is really an ode to teapots. Nice work.
4  POTTERY, CERAMICS, POLYMER CLAY / Pottery, Ceramics, etc: Completed Projects / Re: Metalic Brown Ceramic Sausage Bowl on: July 13, 2008 02:51:10 PM
It's really nicely modern - in a 60's modern kind of way. Which I'm a big fan of. I guess that's the nice thing about simple abstract shapes - everyone sort of sees what they like in it.

I'm assuming this was made with a hump mold? When I get frustrated with throwing, I hand build to loosen back up. Love me some hump molds.
5  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Other Image Reproduction Techniques: Completed Projects / Re: Xerox transfer collage - Geared & vaguely Steampunk images - (picture heavy) on: July 13, 2008 12:48:09 PM
Aw - thank you all so much for the encouragement!

Being new & not having read everything on the board, I assumed lots of people used this technique as it's so simple & fast.  I learned it in art book making forever ago & it's my favorite trick I ever learned.  There are so many transfer techniques I think my version is quite basic.

Basically, the tools are:
  a xerox copy - not a ink jet or laser print, as you need something with toner
  a blender marker pen. - Every designers marker set has one. It's the juice that holds the pigment.  Cheapest ones often work better, I use Chartpak. It looks just like the black marker except for the type on the label.

Place the image face down on your surface (paper, smooth wood, or fabric). Place a clear coat of marker over the back & burnish.  I use the fat back end of the pen in my right hand, as my other hand is holding the image still so it won't smear.

It takes a little testing to get the hang of it. Too much marker & the image will blur, too little & it's ghostlike.  You can mimic the look of a stamp very easily.  It's actually hardest to get a clear dark image & I sometimes go in with a fine pen to touch up edges.  To be precise I sometimes use a lightbox to see thru the paper, however most of the time you can see enough without one.  I use clip art images. Because you can only use an image once & I have images I prefer, I often cut & paste my images into dense pages by catagory (gears, birds, bicycles, planes). I then do a few different scales.  If you can use your office copier - all the better!

When using type you need to flip the image so that it will read correctly. This can be done in a computer program. The analog way is to copy to a transparency & then flip the transparency on the copier to print a mirror image. Transparency technique is a little fuzzier than computer print, but if the transparency is pressed firm to the copier glass its pretty good.

This is also good for printing in blank bound books, wood, decorating brown shipping boxes (say with lots of bicycles or planes), painting guidelines, etc.  It does not stay on fabric through the wash, but maybe there's a sealing technique I don't know about?

Below is an example of using it on wood.  I copied & enlarged the stamp images & used those for some mail art. These were thrown in the mail as is, the intention being the post marks on the stamps are part of the final look.  Black & white photos can be quite good as well.








6  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Other Image Reproduction Techniques: Completed Projects / Re: Farmworker's Rights Poster - Reduction Linoleum Print on: July 13, 2008 10:51:34 AM
You're right, I *do* love that other farming poster!  They both rock extra hard with rock sauce on top.  Lately we are growing our own food (well some) and chickens - and you really start to see what goes on with your food.  Alternately, farm life is also so damn time consuming & back braking I can see why people want short cuts.  Although like crafts, homegrown tomatoes are cheaper than therapy.
7  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Other Image Reproduction Techniques: Completed Projects / Re: Farmworker's Rights Poster - Reduction Linoleum Print on: July 12, 2008 10:54:41 PM
Very cool print. The message & style really work well together.

I have to also ask about your avatar. Is that a Daft Punk image of your yours? Also awesome.

Cheers -

K: / Pets
8  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Other Image Reproduction Techniques: Completed Projects / Xerox transfer collage - Geared & vaguely Steampunk images - (picture heavy) on: July 12, 2008 10:40:14 PM
Hi there!

I've been making xerox transfer collages for years now. My favorite is using a drawn outline & then creating a built up image using xerox transfer.  I'm not sure if this latest nearly complete  figure translates well - but let me know what you think:

 
to change your image viewing settings please click here

I also used a drawing with a xerox transfer to fill in the garment detail on this:

 
to change your image viewing settings please click here

Here's a branch test that goes with that figure:



Other xerox collage, some with logos I made for a gift project:







 
to change your image viewing settings please click here




9  MORE ART, LESS CRAFT / More Art, Less Craft: Completed Works / Re: Silly Portraits! on: July 12, 2008 04:40:31 PM
Very Nice - especially like your cat!

Cheers!
10  TOYS, DOLLS AND PLAYTHINGS / Toys, Dolls and Playthings: Completed Projects / Re: American McGee's Alice plush doll on: July 12, 2008 02:56:02 PM
I love that game. Great job!


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