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1  KNITTING / Knitting: Discussion and Questions / Changing Yarn Colours on: January 14, 2009 10:08:18 PM
Hello, all. I have a question about changing colours - sorry if it's been asked before, I took a quick look around and couldn't find anything, but if I missed another thread or a handy link explaining this feel free just to link me. ^_^

 I'm trying to do some Doctor Who themed knitting, and I want to use a light blue for TARDIS panels (for those not in the fandom, the gist is: a big blue rectangle, with lighter blue rectangles on it). I don't have a pattern, I'm just doing as I normally do and fiddling around until things look right, but I've never done anything with multiple solid blocks of colour in the same row before and I can't wrap my head around how to do it. I read about the Fair Isle method, but the blocks the way I've planed them out are too wide for it to work nicely - I tried, and unless I'm doing something wrong, it's just going to be an unpleasant mess, particularly because these are going to be armwarmers, so the wearer's fingers will inevitably catch on the loops if they're too big.  The other method I found was called, um, intarsia?, where each chunk of colour has it's own ball of yarn... but if I'm knitting rectangles side by side with two different strands of yarn, won't I essentially end up with two separate rectangles growing out from the same needle but completely unattached to each other?

Am I confused on some point here, or missing the logical solution? Is there some other way to do this?
2  CLOTHING / Costumes: Completed Projects / Steampunk Accessories - 2 pairs goggles + lace cuffs on: January 14, 2009 09:50:36 PM
Hello, Craftsters! *salutes* This is my first time starting a thread on your wonderful site, so I invite (nay, entreat) you to correct me if I somehow inadvertently go against Craftster rules, etiquette or common sense. Smiley

At the end of last term, my residence had a formal end-of-year banquet, which they foolishly decided to make Victorian themed. This of course was just ASKING for a group of us to go Steampunk. As the only girl in the group with any previous experience doing Steampunky stuff, I got the task of dressing all the female folk. Thankfully I was able to dress the majority of us out of my closet, their closets and the closet of a punk-inclined friend, but a few of the outfits just needed one or two more touches to really give them a Steampunk feel, and I really wasn't in the mood to study for exams anyhow, and thus the following three props were born:

(I apologize for the blanked out faces, but since I didn't ask any of my friends for permission to post these photos outside of facebook, it seemed the polite thing to do. I also apologise for not having any detail shots of anything - they're all stored nice and neat on my camera, and the cable to get them OFF said camera is nice and safe at home. I'm working with the photos my friend took.)

Lace Cuffs



I got the idea for these from a wee little eighth-of-the-page add I found in an old magazine up at my Aunt's cottage - I honestly couldn't tell you which one. They're basically just lace, about a half yard per wrist, scrunched up (I don't know the technical term - where you sew it with loose stitches on the machine, then pull on one of the two threads to get it to runch up?) and sewn to elastic, then sewn into a loop. You just slip them on under a long sleeved shirt, like a bracelet - although depending on quite how long the sleeves are, a safety pin can be helpful in preventing the revelation that they're not quite as attached to the shirt as I'd like people to imagine.

These were surprisingly popular, and I got a few requests to make people a pair for day-to-day usage - I figure, I have elastic, thread and free time, so as long as people say they'll provide the lace, I'm willing to say I'll make them. Who knows - maybe I'll start up a new fad. Wink

Ridiculous Goggles



These goggles are my favourites. ^_^ I wanted them ridiculously huge and a bit manic looking, and I pulled it off to my prefect satisfaction. Because I was working out of a dorm room, they're a bit ad hoc. The cylindrical base is a tetly tea canister, the circular bit over the lens is cardboard from an ink cartridge package and is held to the tea canister bit with electrical tape, all liberally decorated with gold spray paint. The lenses themselves are the lid from the cheap, disposable Tupperware container my Mum sent me cookies in and are held into the eyepiece with sticky tack. The side bits (again, not sure of the technical term - the bits that are shaped to hold the lens in the correct location relative to the face) are leather from an ooooold coat I bought on the cheap a year ago, specifically to hack up for scraps, re-enforced with the ink-cartridge cardboard and held in place with strategic stapling. The nosepiece was done similarly, only sans the cardboard. The strap was some black elastic I had, and is also held in place with strategic stapling. It was, needless to say, a bit of a labour of love. *grin*

Easy Goggles



These goggles started life as discarded ski goggles, which I rescued from the trash on the principal that they were bound to come in handy eventually. I cut away a lot of the foam padding, popped out the lens and removed the strap, than spray-painted it liberally. After finagling the lens back in, I cut another bit of leather-coat scrap up to make a new strap, which was also held on with strategic stapling. It was quick, simple, and made the girl in question's outfit look way more steampunky, so I was pretty pleased with these overall.


Thanks for looking!
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