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1  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Discussion and Questions / Re: Dremel ? on: November 17, 2007 12:54:59 PM
I have the XPR and I love it. I use it all the time. I work with sterling-It allows me to drill and polish my work when I don't have access to larger equipment.

constantina, If you're looking for something to drill into beads with, however, I don't think the Dremel is right for you. You definitely need a drill press so the holes are uniform and perpendicular. when drilling by hand it is easy to get wonky holes...at least, for me, and I've been doing it for years. Cheesy

I'm going to buy the dremel workstation soon and it allows the dremel to be used as a drill press. So far I'm not sure how well it will work since it seems to be made from plastic...I've heard mixed reviews-you could definitely give it a try!
2  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: please tell me how to sew lace/crochet on fabic on: September 20, 2007 06:56:03 AM
If you own a sewing machine that offers different stitches, there's one specifically for sewing down laces. It kind of looks like a zig-zag stitch with one or two zig-zags that are longer than the rest. I'm not near my machine and I've never sewn lace before, so, going straight from memory I'd say it's either #4 or #88 on this chart:

3  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: Reconstruction : Cardboard into Tote on: September 19, 2007 04:44:29 PM
Ok, I'm a bit late with the response...but, I would perhaps forgo sewing all together and just use some duct tape (or a clear tape) to tape up the corners inside AND out.

Another idea would be to punch holes in the edges and insert grommets or eyelets in the holes-then you can lace them up like a corset or some shoes...

You'll definitely not get a sewing machine to do the work for you. Wink
4  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Completed Projects: General / Re: Sterling silver double hoops-pics, finally! on: September 19, 2007 04:00:54 PM
Quote
Did it take much for you to develop your own studio/workspace?
I'm really hoping to go somewhere with it all and maybe even make a bit of a living so if you have any tips for getting started or getting to the point of making things this excellent, let me know!

Quote from: long.white.cloud
Did it take much for you to develop your own studio/workspace?
I'm really hoping to go somewhere with it all and maybe even make a bit of a living so if you have any tips for getting started or getting to the point of making things this excellent, let me know!

Thanks for the compliments!

Well, it did take me awhile. I took my first metals class in H.S. (10 years ago!)  so I got tons of practice in the basics then. I learned that I was really good with detail work and loved sawing/filing/soldering. A few years ago I just started taking classes because I remembered it was something I loved doing. I found myself  getting so involved my projects that it wase hard to wait until the next class to work them so I bought myself a saw, some needle files,  and a bench pin. Obviously, to make earrings like I made you'd need access to a torch, which I don't have. But, I made the necklace in my avatar at home...all I used was a saw, bench pin, files, hammer, and my dremmel for sanding. I'm far from having my own full studio but I can definitely get by on what I have, for now! Just buy the basics first (saw, bench pin, and maybe a set of needle files, and one larger file for fast metal removal) then build up from there. 

The main tip I have for good results is FILE, FILE, FILE. Then sand and file more. IT is what makes all the difference. And try to be exact when sawing so you don't h ave as much clean up work Wink

Quote
I am in my first semester of metalsmith/jewelry making even though I am a economics major - but I love it. I am still on my first piece and it is turning out wonky - but at least I am getting better and sawing and filing. I lucked out as my other half already has all the more serious and expensive tools in his garage and is getting me comfortable with the blowtorch already.

Everyone's first piece turns out wonky but I think you can progress really fast if you like what you're doing! I'm really jealous of that set up. Since you have someone close to you who is already into metalworking you'll be great in no time.

5  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Completed Projects: General / Re: Sterling silver double hoops-pics, finally! on: September 18, 2007 01:48:05 PM
Those are really beautiful! I used to take a great metal working class, it was so much fun! Where do you buy your silver from? I've been wanting to work with metal at home, but I never could find where to buy supplies  Huh

Thanks! I got that silver from http://www.riogrande.com. Their shipping gets a bit costy if you're making a small purchase. I am lucky enough to have a shop in my area that caters to metal workers so I can get sterling from them for a bit more if I'm in a bind.

I was too slow and missed my opportunity for the class this time around. I do have some tools at my disposal so I can make a lot of things at my home studio-I just get held up on soldering. I have no torch. Yet. Sad
6  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Completed Projects: General / Sterling silver double hoops-pics, finally! on: September 18, 2007 01:21:20 PM
Wow, it took me forever to take pics of my favorite earrings. I admit, these have been done for a few months...but I still love them best!



 

I made them using flat sheet 20g sterling silver and after cutting, sanding, filing, and shaping, I soldered on a sterling post. YAY!

Anyone else get into metal working?

7  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: Leather Coat into Leather Bag --- TIPS? on: September 18, 2007 11:58:01 AM
I am studying leather sewing for personal uses but haven't done it before...I do have a few tips from what I've read:

You may want to use some thick thread to prevent breakage. Also, don't use pins on the leather! The pinholes will be permanent. I've heard of people using rubber cement and bulldog clips to hold the leather in place.


Here's a pretty good list of tips I just found on Google, too:
http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/Leather/SewingLea.htm

Have fuN!
8  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: Help Please on: September 05, 2007 10:28:07 AM
Ok, first, I apologize for my awful pic but I was trying to be quick with it....I hope I don't confuse you more with it.

1) cut out 2 pieces of fabric in the shape you want from the same stencil (one will be the front of the pocket and one will be the back, or inside of the pocket). They don't have to be the same fabric if you want contrast.

2) line them up evenly with the outside of the fabric (the good side) facing inward.

3) sew as such:

4) the red triangles in the pic above are where you'll need to trim. Be careful to NOT cut into the seam you created. Removing this fabric will help the curve lay flat. Also, trim a bit off of the peak so you don't have so much fabric bunched in there...it will define that point later on.

5) turn the pocket right side out using the opening at the bottom.

6) flatten, press, turn in the opened edge and top-stitch it closed.

7) DONE!
9  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: Peltex problems ~ HELP! on: August 23, 2007 06:23:04 PM
Well, the problem could be as simple as application error. There was a detailed story in a sewing magazine i picked up last year concerning the correct way to fuse interfacings. It's all about using tons of steam, lots of downward pressure, and not moving the iron around a lot (put it down, press down for 30 seconds using tons of steam or a wet cloth, and then move onto the next spot. repeat).

The interfacing may also be too heavy for your fabric. Interfacing should be lighter than your fabric so you can't see it through the fabric. I really don't like anything other than sew-in or extra lightweight fusible these days because I encountered the same issues as you...

Good luck!
10  PURSES, BAGS, WALLETS / Purses, Bags, Wallets: Discussion and Questions / Re: What is interfacing? on: August 21, 2007 01:13:28 PM
Interfacing is a material people layer between fabrics for different reasons, such as, stabilizing, thickening, or for volume. It can be thin and paper-like, or soft and lofty like cotton balls. You can get iron on or sew in varieites. The type you use depends on many things including fabric choice and project design. I think it is extremely necessary in most handbag designs unless you are making a canvas tote or working with thick leather. I highly recommend doing some searches both here on Craftster and on Google for additional information on interfacing and its uses since there are so many options. Smiley
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