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1  NEEDLEWORK / Needlework: Discussion and Questions / ? Linen Guest Towel Size on: March 17, 2005 07:34:46 PM
 want to make a set of monogramed linen(ish) guest towels for an upcoming wedding gift.  (You know the type that you hope your guests' hands are most clean before they use.)  The question is, what is the finished size of a generous linen guest towel?

I'm guessing that my material is 100% mercerized cotton.  It is on the "rough" side at about 48 threads to the inch but, and the threads themselves are pretty thick in diameter; I originally picked it up for my cross stitch stash on a bargin table.  It barely shrunk or raveled when I washed it in commerically hot water; the particular laundry mat I went to backs a restaurant.  Also, I put bleach in the wash water and it stayed white!  It is 50 plus inches wide but not 60 inches; I only measured enough after washing to ensure that I had enough to make two towels.  I have a full yard in length.

Also, any input about the hems and side finishes would be great. - I am not doing any eyelet type stuff at the hem though. -  I was thinking of a generous, not quite double fold, hand hemmed front and back hem; possibly a little bigger in the front than in the back  Then stitching that in with a 1/4"-3/8" double folded and machine stiched side "hem"/finish with blunt corners (as opposed to anything mitered).

As for the monogram, I was thinking of a a VERY light, off-white type, peach.  The couple recently bought a house and will be re-doing their bathroom in yet undecided colors.  I haven't really looked at monogram patterns/charts yet; monograms and alphabets are not what I seek normally.  I'm sure that I have more than one set in my "stuff"; plus it gives me an excuse to surf and pour through books at the library.  I am leaning away from the cross stitch and towards stem and satin stitches.  I don't want a super padded or lofty satin stitch, just the resulting look of a wisp of the monogram. - However, I want the stitches "strong" enough in stature so that with time, washings, and maybe even a required bleaching or two (for those guests whose hands weren't honestly clean before using) the monogram is still identifyable as the peach fades towards a white color.

My main question is still about the finished size.  But, if you have any other comments or input that would be great too.
 
 
2  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / ?Linen Guest Towel Size on: March 17, 2005 07:32:01 PM
 want to make a set of monogramed linen(ish) guest towels for an upcoming wedding gift.  (You know the type that you hope your guests' hands are most clean before they use.)  The question is, what is the finished size of a generous linen guest towel?

I'm guessing that my material is 100% mercerized cotton.  It is on the "rough" side at about 48 threads to the inch but, and the threads themselves are pretty thick in diameter; I originally picked it up for my cross stitch stash on a bargin table.  It barely shrunk or raveled when I washed it in commerically hot water; the particular laundry mat I went to backs a restaurant.  Also, I put bleach in the wash water and it stayed white!  It is 50 plus inches wide but not 60 inches; I only measured enough after washing to ensure that I had enough to make two towels.  I have a full yard in length.

Also, any input about the hems and side finishes would be great. - I am not doing any eyelet type stuff at the hem though. -  I was thinking of a generous, not quite double fold, hand hemmed front and back hem; possibly a little bigger in the front than in the back  Then stitching that in with a 1/4"-3/8" double folded and machine stiched side "hem"/finish with blunt corners (as opposed to anything mitered).

As for the monogram, I was thinking of a a VERY light, off-white type, peach.  The couple recently bought a house and will be re-doing their bathroom in yet undecided colors.  I haven't really looked at monogram patterns/charts yet; monograms and alphabets are not what I seek normally.  I'm sure that I have more than one set in my "stuff"; plus it gives me an excuse to surf and pour through books at the library.  I am leaning away from the cross stitch and towards stem and satin stitches.  I don't want a super padded or lofty satin stitch, just the resulting look of a wisp of the monogram. - However, I want the stitches "strong" enough in stature so that with time, washings, and maybe even a required bleaching or two (for those guests whose hands weren't honestly clean before using) the monogram is still identifyable as the peach fades towards a white color.

My main question is still about the finished size.  But, if you have any other comments or input that would be great too.
 
 
3  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Discussion and Questions / ? Linen Guest towel Size on: March 17, 2005 06:02:21 PM
I want to make a set of monogramed linen(ish) guest towels for an upcoming wedding gift.  (You know the type that you hope your guests' hands are most clean before they use.)  The question is, what is the finished size of a generous linen guest towel?

I'm guessing that my material is 100% mercerized cotton.  It is on the "rough" side at about 48 threads to the inch but, and the threads themselves are pretty thick in diameter; I originally picked it up for my cross stitch stash on a bargin table.  It barely shrunk or raveled when I washed it in commerically hot water; the particular laundry mat I went to backs a restaurant.  Also, I put bleach in the wash water and it stayed white!  It is 50 plus inches wide but not 60 inches; I only measured enough after washing to ensure that I had enough to make two towels.  I have a full yard in length.

Also, any input about the hems and side finishes would be great. - I am not doing any eyelet type stuff at the hem though. -  I was thinking of a generous, not quite double fold, hand hemmed front and back hem; possibly a little bigger in the front than in the back  Then stitching that in with a 1/4"-3/8" double folded and machine stiched side "hem"/finish with blunt corners (as opposed to anything mitered).

As for the monogram, I was thinking of a a VERY light, off-white type, peach.  The couple recently bought a house and will be re-doing their bathroom in yet undecided colors.  I haven't really looked at monogram patterns/charts yet; monograms and alphabets are not what I seek normally.  I'm sure that I have more than one set in my "stuff"; plus it gives me an excuse to surf and pour through books at the library.  I am leaning away from the cross stitch and towards stem and satin stitches.  I don't want a super padded or lofty satin stitch, just the resulting look of a wisp of the monogram. - However, I want the stitches "strong" enough in stature so that with time, washings, and maybe even a required bleaching or two (for those guests whose hands weren't honestly clean before using) the monogram is still identifyable as the peach fades towards a white color.

My main question is still about the finished size.  But, if you have any other comments or input that would be great too.
4  OCCASIONS AND HOLIDAYS / Weddings and Bridal Showers / ? Linen Guest Towel Size on: March 17, 2005 05:59:55 PM
I want to make a set of monogramed linen(ish) guest towels for an upcoming wedding gift.  (You know the type that you hope your guests' hands are most clean before they use.)  The question is, what is the finished size of a generous linen guest towel?

I'm guessing that my material is 100% mercerized cotton.  It is on the "rough" side at about 48 threads to the inch but, and the threads themselves are pretty thick in diameter; I originally picked it up for my cross stitch stash on a bargin table.  It barely shrunk or raveled when I washed it in commerically hot water; the particular laundry mat I went to backs a restaurant.  Also, I put bleach in the wash water and it stayed white!  It is 50 plus inches wide but not 60 inches; I only measured enough after washing to ensure that I had enough to make two towels.  I have a full yard in length.

Also, any input about the hems and side finishes would be great. - I am not doing any eyelet type stuff at the hem though. -  I was thinking of a generous, not quite double fold, hand hemmed front and back hem; possibly a little bigger in the front than in the back  Then stitching that in with a 1/4"-3/8" double folded and machine stiched side "hem"/finish with blunt corners (as opposed to anything mitered).

As for the monogram, I was thinking of a a VERY light, off-white type, peach.  The couple recently bought a house and will be re-doing their bathroom in yet undecided colors.  I haven't really looked at monogram patterns/charts yet; monograms and alphabets are not what I seek normally.  I'm sure that I have more than one set in my "stuff"; plus it gives me an excuse to surf and pour through books at the library.  I am leaning away from the cross stitch and towards stem and satin stitches.  I don't want a super padded or lofty satin stitch, just the resulting look of a wisp of the monogram. - However, I want the stitches "strong" enough in stature so that with time, washings, and maybe even a required bleaching or two (for those guests whose hands weren't honestly clean before using) the monogram is still identifyable as the peach fades towards a white color.

My main question is still about the finished size.  But, if you have any other comments or input that would be great too.
5  OCCASIONS AND HOLIDAYS / Misc. Gift Idea Brain Blockage / Expendables For Those Who Have Everything on: December 01, 2004 07:08:37 PM
Have well-established folks on your list? - Think expendables, things that will be used up in the year to come.  These may be food type items, bath type items, supplies for activities or hobbies they already do, or tickets/memberships to events in their area.

If you can't compete in the dollar arena, then compete in the unusual collection area.  For example in foods, try some canning/mayonnaise jars of different pastas, rices, flours, hot cereal grains, etc...  Or, do a few unusual items.  Or, a few items that "they" wouldn't necessarily buy on their own for daily eating but don't have to cost a fortune.  Or, maybe sample size quantities of a variety such as a couple of ounces of different cheese and a package of simple crackers.  In the bath type items, try a collection of interestingly packaged everyday "pampering" items such as a box of Epsom salts, a loufa sponge or puffy, a container of Corn Huskers, and some lip balm.  Towards tickets or memberships, often public things such as museams and zoos have tickets or memberships at varrying rates for varrying levels of participation that can be used at will within their time schedule.  The sky is the limit for those have have crafts and hobbies but don't forget the basics such as sand paper, templates, etc...  And, if you have a hobby type with "stuff" there are always storage solutions needed.

 
6  REUSING/RECYCLING/RECRAFTING / Where To Find Things To Recycle / Flower Bulb Racks on: November 16, 2004 02:37:21 PM
In our area, many of the box type discount/variety and home improvement stores reveive their flower bulbs in wood frames; the bulbs themselves are in boxes, packages, and sacks that fit onto/into the frames.  They are free for the asking if you can get someone to give you a call and/or you can be there are the right time.  One of the sytles makes great frames for book, garage, closet, or pantry shelves.  The other style is great for beside the the door wood or boot boxes.
7  NEEDLEWORK / Needlework: Discussion and Questions / Preservation Questions on: November 13, 2004 07:50:33 PM
I'm not currently doing anything special or of "heirloom" quality but on the off chance that some of my stuff survives me, I wouldn't mind taking some small steps now so that it has a chance.  Right now, I know of two different cross stitch pictures in two different living rooms on which finger prints are starting to show on the background fabric and I certainly don't want that; sadly, one of them is intricate and surpurbly stitched.

I do wash my hands before and relatively frequently during stitching. And, I take care not to splash coffee on my work or dribble crumbs...

I've heard of a fabric soap from the quilter's world that is suppose to be good for washing fabrics to be preserved.  I haven't actually tracked a bottle down yet but will before I do anything for a wall or ornaments next year.  (Lately I've been doing items that will undoubtedly be stashed in a closet or actually used and washed.)

I must confess that I've been using masking tape to bind my work edges for years.  Does anyone know of the long term affects of the masking tape glues?  Can I cut off these masked edges and do a sewn edge for my projects once completed?  Or, will the glues have seeped further than their boundries and if so, what are the consequenses?  Is there an alternative tape or glue that can be used temporarily and then cut away? 

Back in the day, I was taught to wash, rinse well, and then block on corrugrated cardboard cut from a grocery store box using good quality, steel pins.  With all of the discussion about acidic versus acid free among the masses in the paper world, I've concluded that I should be blocking on acid free cardboard.  Do they make an acid free cardboard?  Is blocking the semi-wet/damp project on cardboard (acid free of course) by pulling taught and using many pins until it dries still considered a advisable method?  If not, why and what alternatives should I be using?

I've already figured out that any wooden frame should be WELL sealed at any place in which it comes in contact with my fabric.  Is there any partioular sealer I should not use and/or any I should use?  And, I've figured out that the back of the fabric shouldn't be adhered with glue, spray adhesive, duct tape, nor masking tape; I've seen each in various directions for framing embroidery.  My next question however, is what type of backing board should be used?  If my project material is not large enough to be pulled over the edges of the backing board, what would be the ideal edging material to sew to it and why?  From what I've figured, the long drawing stitches across the backing board seems to be the best securing technique. And, I would expect to put in a paper backing to prevent dust (?and air pollutants?) coming in the back.  Again, is this good and if so what type of paper would I use?   I know it's suppose to be protected and yet breath.

And, I know that if I absolutely don't want finger prints to show in 5-50 years, I should use white cotton gloves when handling material from the time it is washed on; we'll have to see how dedicated I am once I get something done that is going into a frame rather than hung on a live tree, kitchen towel, well used afgan, or throw pillow.

Is there something else I should know?

P.S. If I actually do something for a frame again, what would be a good background fabric to use?  Again, something that could stand the test of time.  Because I don't have the project picked out yet, it could be of any type, texture, or color.  (That's not to say I don't have enough patterns, charts, and possibilities in my collection to cover every inch of wall space in the greater neighborhood!)
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