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1  CLOTHING / Costumes: Completed Projects / Rogue and Wasp Cosplay for the wee one on: September 24, 2013 12:28:34 PM
The 2nd annual Rose City Comic Con was just this past weekend.  My 5 year old daughter Aria decided on not one but TWO costumes.  Makes sense considering there are two days of comic con.  Her first request was Rogue and the second was Wasp from The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes.  I'll provide links to my supplies and tutorials after each photo.

First up is Rogue.  


Leotard:
I used Kwik Sew 3103 for the pattern.  I had to do a little color blocking to get that classic green/yellow Rogue look.  It was quite an adventure as I'd never worked with spandex before.  Thankfully, I have a serger and after buying some wooly nylon thread, it actually wasn't too bad to work with.    The spandex is Milliskin Shiny four way stretch and I got it from the Spandex House . I used the left overs to make her boot covers and gloves and headband.
Belt:
The belt used to be a Men's large belt that I simply cut down.  I bought a belt buckle blank off an etsy shop and used duct tape to make the X-Men logo.  I considered using resin and really getting technical but I decided that this would enable me to change up her belt buckle for future costumes.  Resewing the buckle onto the belt was a cinch with my beautiful Bernina 350 PE.  Oh my goodness, I love that machine so much (Thanks, Craftster for the chance to play and then later buy the machine).  
Jacket:
I couldn't find a bomber jacket pattern for the life of me so I ended up using Cali Faye Collection's DrewB Blazer pattern .  I simply cropped the design a lot to get the right look.  The jacket was made from this weird faux leather fabric.  I liked it because comic cons can get kind of hot and I wanted something light weight.  I made up a felt patch for it and sewed it on by hand.  
Accessories:
The boots are simple knee high boots that I covered with spandex boot covers using this tutorial I found online.  The gloves I made simply tracing her hand on some paper.  I figured the spandex would stretch enough to not need little finger gussets.  The white hair was bought from I Kick Shins on Etsy.   I didn't want to use messy hair paints or harsh chemicals.  

The best part?  She had a blast getting so much attention.  We entered her into the 14 and under costume contest at the end of the night.  She got up on that stage in front of a huge crowd of people all by herself.  And she took second in the contest.  She was beyond the moon to have placed.  




Next up is Wasp.  


Dress:
I used a Cali Faye Collection pattern again.  This time the Simply Chic Dress pattern.  I obviously left off the collar and did some color blocking.
Head set:
I used two push lights and simply drilled holes in them to stick little dowel rods into them.  I spray painted them yellow and added black detailing.  They were then attached to a black headband.  
Accessories:
I used the same boots and gloves from the Rogue costume.  Wings were made from thick wire, nylon hose, and spray paint.  

Aria insisted on cutting her hair for the Wasp costume for authenticity.  Like the day before, she got a lot of attention and loved every second of it.  The best part of the second day though was running into the head writer for The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes cartoon.  He called us over to his table and asked me to take a photo of the two of them together on his phone.  He told Aria how he wrote the show and that his favorite character was Wasp.  She was awe-struck and stood there smiling at him shyly.  Now she wants to write him a letter.  heh.  

update (9/27): Since we got that picture, Aria has been saying daily that she wants to send him a letter.  Today while watching his cartoon, she drew him a picture.  I looked all over the internet looking for an address that fans can send him things.  Finally, I found his twitter account and told him that Aria AKA Wasp from Rose City Comic Con really wanted to send him something and asked him if there was an address for fans to send such things.  He sent me an address immediately via a PM and said that I made HIS day.  What a completely down to earth and amazing man.  He earned himself some lifelong fans in this household.  Smiley



We've already bought our tickets for the Emerald City Comic Con and Aria is trying hard to think of who to go as.  Since its only 6 months away and we plan on going the third Rose City Comic Con next year, I may try to steer her towards something more simple...like Kiki from Kiki's Delivery Service.  Heh.  We'll see if she goes for it.
2  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Completed Projects: General / Steampunk Cuff on: July 31, 2013 09:32:15 AM
I made this last year for my sister as she was going to a steampunk ball. 
Its pretty simple but she liked how it turned out.

Materials include raw silk, red leather, vintage ribbon, cogs and gears from an old alarm clock, and a big button for the closure.






Thanks for looking! Smiley
3  Calls for Swap Angels / Swap Angel Archive / Fabric Lovers Scavenger Hunt 2 on: June 18, 2012 09:10:56 AM
Hello!  I need an angel for the Fabric Lovers Scavenger Hunt for mellybelly81.  She sent a lovely package to her partner but it appears her package has gone MIA.  Please help me out here and put together a great package for her!  She is located in Australia so please be willing to ship international unless you are located in Australia too!    

Please read the details for the swap package carefully.  I would need whomever volunteers to be able to get this package together in 2 weeks.    Mellybelly81 has been waiting long enough. You will be required to send me a copy of the receipt to my email.  If you are interested after reading the description, please PM me and I will send you her questionnaire and address.  Thank you!

SWAP DETAILS: In a crafty scavenger hunt you have categories you must interpret and fulfill with crafty items.  The categories definitions are up to you and your own interpretations.  Your package must include 7 items, one for each of the categories.  

One item per category - no single item can do double-duty and count for two categories. However, if a particular item does work for two categories and having two of them would be pleasing to the recipient, then two may be sent. The exception to that would be if it's a pair of something where having only one of the pair would be useless. If it's a pair, the pair can only count for one category. For example, a pair of blue mittens cannot count for something blue and something that starts with the letter M. However, sending two blue mugs, one for the blue category and one for the letter M category, would be allowable.

The Categories Are:
1. Something local
2. Something green
3. Something vintage
4. Something tiny (under 2")
5. Something sharp
6. Something round
7. Sender's choice

*The package must contain at least 7 smalls.
*Five of your 7 items must be related to fabric or fabric crafts.
*You can craft or shop to fulfill categories, but at least two items must crafted.
*One category must be fulfilled by one yard of fabric.  The yard of fabric can be derived from a single piece, fat quarters, jelly roll, charms, etc., just as long as it equals one yard
4  Calls for Swap Angels / Swap Angel Archive / Fabric Lovers Scavenger Hunt on: May 28, 2012 03:06:09 PM
Hello!  I need an angel for the Fabric Lovers Scavenger Hunt for sweetyetevil.  She sent a lovely package to her partner but alas her partner has gone MIA.  Please help me out here and put together a great package for sweetyetevil!  

Please read the details for the swap package carefully.  I would need whomever volunteers to be able to get this package together in 2 weeks.  Sweetyetevil has been waiting long enough.  If you are interested after reading the description, please PM me and I will send you her questionnaire and address.  Thank you!

SWAP DETAILS: In a crafty scavenger hunt you have categories you must interpret and fulfill with crafty items.  The categories definitions are up to you and your own interpretations.  Your package must include 7 items, one for each of the categories.  

One item per category - no single item can do double-duty and count for two categories. However, if a particular item does work for two categories and having two of them would be pleasing to the recipient, then two may be sent. The exception to that would be if it's a pair of something where having only one of the pair would be useless. If it's a pair, the pair can only count for one category. For example, a pair of blue mittens cannot count for something blue and something that starts with the letter M. However, sending two blue mugs, one for the blue category and one for the letter M category, would be allowable.

The Categories Are:
1. Something local
2. Something green
3. Something vintage
4. Something tiny (under 2")
5. Something sharp
6. Something round
7. Sender's choice

*The package must contain at least 7 smalls.
*Five of your 7 items must be related to fabric or fabric crafts.
*You can craft or shop to fulfill categories, but at least two items must crafted.
*One category must be fulfilled by one yard of fabric.  The yard of fabric can be derived from a single piece, fat quarters, jelly roll, charms, etc., just as long as it equals one yard

5  Calls for Swap Angels / Swap Angel Archive / Ongoing Pinterest Swap April - 1 angel needed on: May 16, 2012 01:46:10 AM
Hey all, I need an angel for the April Pinterest Swap for saintCady!  This swap calls for one medium or three smalls inspired by the person's pinterest.

Here is saintCady's bio on the swap thread http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=406667.msg4795242#msg4795242 and her pinterest http://pinterest.com/saintcady/

Please be sure to read their bio's carefully... some folks specifically list which pinterest boards they would like to be claimed from.  

PM me if you are interested in angeling and I will PM you her address.  Please note that I would need the package shipped out within two weeks.

Thank you!
6  MASTER CRAFTSTERS / BERNINA 3 Series / Placemat Quilted with Decorative Stitches using the BERNINA 350PE on: May 15, 2012 10:33:28 AM
Sponsored Content
* To see the overview of this Master Craftsters campaign, click here.
* To read more about the machine used in this project, explore BERNINA's website here.

Placemat Quilted with Decorative Stitches using the BERNINA 350PE

I've been meaning to make a placemat to put under my daughter's plates and bowls when she eats.  At four years old, she frequently makes a mess while eating and a placemat would greatly reduce the cleanup time after meals.  Luckily, the BERNINA 350 Patchwork Edition comes with walking foot.  A walking foot is great for sewing projects with multiple layers like a placemat because it helps ensure that your top layers are feeding at the same rate as your bottom layers.    



I wasn't really interested in making a placemat of particular proportions so I simply picked out my fabrics and started cutting.  The first thing I did was cut out a rectangle of fabric slightly larger than what I wanted the finished size to be for the back of the placemat.  I also cut some batting the same size as my rectangle of fabric for padding.  I then randomly cut out smaller rectangular panels of coordinating fabric.  I made sure that when they were pieced together they would roughly equal the size of the backing I cut out. I also grabbed some double fold bias tape from my stash.



I sewed the smaller rectangular panels together in strips so that they would be easy to piece together.  The three smallest rectangular panels on the right lined up nicely for one long strip.  I sewed the flower and the striped blue panels together and then sewed the striped red/orange/green panel to that.



It helps keep your final pieced panel nice and smooth if you iron the seams down as you sew.  It is definitely an extra step but I find that it makes the finished product a lot nicer.



When I was done, my final front panel was roughly the same size as the fabric that I cut out for the back of the placemat.



I sandwiched the batting between the backing and the front fabric panel.  The right sides of the backing and the front fabric panel should face out like they would on the finished product.  



Then it was time to use the walking foot.  It was really easy to switch feet.  To remove the current foot, you just pull this little lever and pull gently on the foot.  It slides off.  Then you push the new foot into place and push the lever back to lock the foot into place.



When attaching the walking foot, you need to make sure that the "U" shaped arm is hooked onto the screw that you use to replace the sewing needle.  It is what helps the foot "walk" on the fabric to feed the layers through evenly.



After the walking foot was attached, I simply started stitching the placemat.  



I had a lot of fun trying out different stitches on the placemat.  I was curious how well they would come out using the walking foot.  As you can see the BERNINA 350PE works just as nicely with the walking foot.



The BERNINA even stitches a great blanket stitch.  Cheesy



After quilting the layers together, all that left was to attach the bias tape.



I then cut a length of double fold bias tape a little longer than the length of one of my sides.  I opened it up and placed it right side down on the front of my placemat, matching the edges up with the edge of the placemat.  I simply straight stitched down the length.

If you don't want any raw edges on your bias tape, fold down the little edge of the bias tape before sewing. You only have to do it for the strip that is on top.  So for the first strip you don't have to do it all, for the second and third you need to fold down the first end, and both ends for the last strip.



When I was done, I decided that the little linen panel needed something.  The great thing about the BERNINA is that you can stitch letters and since it has a memory you can save combinations of letters to stitch words.  I decided to go with "eat" followed by a little heart stitch.  

To select a letter, I hit the "A" button.  The arrow buttons on either side of the "A" button allow you to scroll through the options.



To save it in the memory, I hit the memory button located directly above the "A" button.  You use the exact same process to save stitches except you hit the "#" button and enter the stitch number first and then hit the memory button to save.  



Look at how fun that stitch is!



I loved using the walking foot for this placemat.  I have tried to make layered projects before and it's a pain trying to make sure that all layers are fed through evenly.  Often I end up with a tiny bunch at the end. Even though I used a ton of different stitches and sewed them every which way possible, the fabric never puckered or bunched oddly.  



The best part was being able to use such fun stitches with the walking foot.  



I've never made a quilt but I'm thinking I need to before I have to send this machine back.  

7  MASTER CRAFTSTERS / BERNINA 3 Series / Interchangeable Buttonhole Flowers using the BERNINA 350PE on: May 15, 2012 10:32:30 AM
Sponsored Content
* To see the overview of this Master Craftsters campaign, click here.
* To read more about the machine used in this project, explore BERNINA's website here.

Interchangeable Buttonhole Flowers using the BERNINA 350PE

Originally, I planned on just making a paperbag skirt.  It's a skirt of my own design that is so easy it literally only requires four straight stitches and some elastic.  But after I whipped together one and documented the process, I realized that while the skirt is loads of fun, the tutorial is decidedly not loads of fun.  So instead I decided I'd play around with an idea that I've had for making interchangeable buttonhole flowers to use on dresses, skirts, pillows, purses...well, just about anything that can stand having a button sewn to it.  The only thing that has been holding me back is my distaste for making buttonholes.  Until the BERNINA 350 Patchwork Edition entered my life that is...  If you were hoping for a tutorial for the skirt, you can find it at the end of this post.





All you need is:
  • An item to decorate
  • Something to make the flowers out of (I used vinyl upholstery samples, but you could use leather.  Wool felt would probably work as well.)
  • Buttons

The first thing I did was cut out my flowers and pick out my buttons.



I placed the buttons in the middle of my flowers and used dressmaker's chalk make four marks so I had an idea of where I wanted the buttonholes.



I positioned the flowers on the skirt where I thought I'd like them to go and then sewed the buttons on by hand.  

The BERNINA 350PE comes with these nifty snap on soles.  It's extremely easy to switch them out.  You just hit the little red button behind the foot and the snap on sole comes off. For the buttonhole foot you have to remove the entire foot, though.  Just move this little lever back and pull the entire foot off.  



This is the buttonhole presser foot.  Attach it by simply pushing it up and then repositioning the lever to lock in place.



I prepped the bobbin by pulling the thread through the eye on the little arm on the bobbin.  This adds extra tension and makes the buttonholes much neater.



I then used the little sliding red marker on the buttonhole foot to measure how big my buttonhole needed to be.  



I put the flower under the buttonhole foot, making sure to position it in the center of my markings, and then lowered the foot to hold it into place.  Next, I pushed the "0" on the number pad.  Here you can see that on the screen, the buttonhole symbol pops up.  



I simply pushed the foot pedal and the machine sewed a satin stitch down the left side.  When it reached the end of my desired buttonhole length (as indicated by the red marker), I hit quick reverse (that would be the little "U" symbol with an arrow on one end that I'm pushing in the picture).  On the screen, a 3A presser foot should appear along with the words AUTO inside the buttonhole symbol.



The rest is super easy.  The machine automatically stitches a reverse straight stitch up the right side, the first bar tack, satin stitches down the right side, the second bar tack, and ends with some securing stitches. The entire time on the screen each side of the "virtual buttonhole" blinks as the machine works on that particular side.  When it is finished it returns to buttonhole begin.  In this picture, you can see the bottom bar tack is "missing" on the display screen.  That's because it was blinking at the time of this photo to let me know that the machine was working on the bottom bar tack.



The neat thing is that the machine remembers the length of the buttonhole for as long as the machine is on. So if your buttons are the same size, you don't have to go through the process of measuring the length and using the red marker on the buttonhole foot.  Just put the fabric under the foot and start sewing.  



You can also save your buttonhole in the memory if you want to keep your buttonhole length long term.  The memory will only store one length per buttonhole type, so this is best for standard button sizes or if you have a project that requires a lot of buttonholes of the same size.  To store the length in the memory, simply press the memory button with the arrow pointing right after you have programmed the length.  



I continued sewing buttonholes on my flowers until all six were done. I then used a seam ripper to carefully make a slit down the center of each buttonhole.



All that was left was to slide the flowers onto the buttons I sewed on the skirt.



Aria thought it was a blast that we could switch out the flowers.  



If you're logged in, you can download the JPG tutorial for the skirt below.
8  MASTER CRAFTSTERS / BERNINA 3 Series / Luggage tags using the BERNINA 350PE on: May 15, 2012 10:31:38 AM
Sponsored Content
* To see the overview of this Master Craftsters campaign, click here.
* To read more about the machine used in this project, explore BERNINA's website here.

Luggage tags using the BERNINA 350PE

Early this April I traveled to San Diego for a conference.  Waiting at the San Diego airport baggage claim, I suddenly became aware of a problem.  I own a black bag.  And so does every other single person apparently. As I watched black bag after black bag roll out onto the carousel, I realized that my life would be easier if I had a cheerful luggage tag to catch my eye.  

Good thing I'm crafty.  

I checked out a few tutorials online but they were all a bit too complicated for me.  We are talking about a luggage tag after all and I didn't really wish to spend an inordinate amount of time making one.  So I decided to come up with my own design.  And then I made seven of them.  This is a super simple project but the nice thing about the BERNINA 350 Patchwork Edition is that with so many decorative stitch options, the luggage tag doesn't have to look boring.



The first step is to gather and prepare all the supplies.  To make one luggage tag, I used:
  • Sturdy fusible stabilizer - 10 inches by 3 inches
  • Fabric - 10.5 inches by 3.5 inches
  • Clear vinyl - 4 inches by 2.5 inches (get the thicker kind, it's easier for the machine to sew)
  • 1/2 inch double fold bias tape - 3 inches
  • Grosgrain ribbon - 17 inches



But really, if you are making one, you might as well make several. I started out with three but quickly realized that I should just make up a bunch.  I think they would make lovely gifts for people who like to travel.

I wanted my luggage tag to have that gift tag look, so I trimmed off the corners.  



When I was done cutting one side, I just folded the stabilizer in half and used the freshly trimmed corners as a guide to cut the other side.



Then I put my 10.5 by 3.5 fabric piece right side down and then centered the stabilizer on top of it.  I carefully folded and then ironed the edges over all the way around the stabilizer.  



When I was done one side had folded over raw edges and the other side looked nice and crisp.





I then prepped the vinyl window by taking the 3 inch long piece of double fold bias tape and sandwiching the vinyl between the layers.



I placed my bias tape and vinyl sandwich under the presser foot.  The foot I am using is an open embroidery foot, snap on sole #20.  I like it quite a lot because of its open design which gives you a good view of your fabric and stitches.  



Selecting a stitch is really quite easy with the BERNINA.  You simply find the stitch you want to use on the handy reference card.  The decorative stitches are numbered 23-74.  In order to select the stitch you want, push the button marked with a "#" sign, and then enter the desired stitch number on the number pad located on the front of the sewing machine.  Here I am selecting my favorite stitch, stitch 68, which produces the sweetest leaf design.  



The little edge of your window is a perfect canvas for decorative stitching.  With the BERNINA, finding a decorative stitch is not a problem; it's choosing one that becomes the challenge.  Of course, since I was making seven of them, I wasn't limited in my choices.  I trimmed the bias tape so that it was flush with the vinyl.



After I prepped my vinyl window, I took the fabric covered stabilier and placed the vinyl window on it so that the decorated bias tape edge was tucked just under the beveled edge.  Using the zig zag stitch, I attached the window to the fabric covered stabilizer, making sure to leave the decorated bias tape edge open.  A lot of people have trouble sewing vinyl because it has a tendency to want to stick.  I actually have a special teflon foot for my other sewing machine when sewing tricky vinyl and leather.  But I didn't have any of those problems using the BERNINA 350PE.  She stitched through it all without even a hiccup.



It should look like this when you are done.



Then I folded over the 17 inch grosgrain ribbon, folded the fabric covered stabilizer, and sandwiched the ribbon in between the open edges of the stabilizer.  Using a zig zag stitch I secured the ribbon.  



The final step is to sew all the way around the tag with a straight stitch.  I was pleasantly surprised to discover that the BERNINA can sew through two layers of super durable stabilizer without a hitch.  



And now I have a luggage tag to help me find my bag amongst the sea of suit cases on the baggage carousel.  I'm also thinking this would work lovely for ID badge holders if you just make the ribbon long enough to fit over your head.



See?  Much better.  My black suitcase suddenly became just a little bit snazzier.

9  MASTER CRAFTSTERS / BERNINA 3 Series / Fabric Bucket using the BERNINA 350PE on: May 15, 2012 10:30:39 AM
Sponsored Content
* To see the overview of this Master Craftsters campaign, click here.
* To read more about the machine used in this project, explore BERNINA's website here.

Fabric Bucket using the BERNINA 350PE

I collect clutter like nothing else.  I have come to realize that rather than fight the urge I just need to find ways to hide it.  Fabric buckets are a great way to do just that.  Here's a super simple tutorial for making a set of fabric buckets of your own.  With the BERNINA 350 Patchwork Edition, sewing through the thick canvas that gives these buckets their shape is a snap.



You need:
Fabric - cut into a rectangle the size of your choice.  This one is roughly 16 inches x 9 inches.  Fold the fabric in half for a rough idea of how big your finished bucket will be. I do recommend that if your pieces are larger than 24 x 16, you might want to consider using some interfacing or other stabilizer to help your bucket keep its shape.  
Canvas - cut to the same size as the fabric

You will find a straight edge and dressmaker's chalk handy but they aren't essential.



First, I got the BERNINA 350PE ready to do a little work.  The BERNINA 350PE has several little features that make sewing a more relaxing process.  I am rather fond of the little needle threader.  My first machine had one, but when I moved up to a better machine, I was aghast to discover it had no threader.  I was happy to see one on the BERNINA.



In addition, BERNINA has put a thread cutter in just about every place you might need one.  This is great for folks like me who tend to forget to haul their scissors to the sewing table.  There is one on the upper left side of the machine.



There is also one near the bobbin winder for when you are done winding your bobbin.



And finally one located inside the chamber that holds the bobbin while you are sewing.  



Once the BERNINA was threaded and ready to go, I took my two rectangle pieces and folded them together so the short ends met.  On the canvas it doesn't appear to matter which side, but the fabric should be right sides together.  Then I used a straight stitch to secure both sides of the fabric.  I left the short ends, opposite the fold, open.  If you check out my other projects, it will become apparent that I am in love with snap on sole #20.  It's an open embroidery foot which allows you to view your fabric and the stitches more easily.  I am a control freak so this totally appeals to me.  



I did the same with the canvas but I left a 2 inch opening in the middle of one side.  This is important so you can turn your bucket right side out later.



I matched up the side seams on both pieces.



Then I folded the canvas and the fabric so I was left with what looked like houses.  



To create the base of the bucket, I took a ruler and dressmakers chalk and marked a sewing line roughly 3 inches in from the tip of the point.  The deeper the line the more narrow the base.



I kept them as similar as possible since they are nested together in the final step.



I stitched along the lines I marked on both the fabric and canvas.  This is where I really noticed a difference between the BERNINA 350PE and my old machine.  I have made these buckets before and sewing over the side seam on the canvas can be difficult since the canvas is three - four layers thick there. I didn't even notice on the BERNINA; she really handles the canvas smoothly.  I might have to make up a ton of these as gifts before I have to return her.  



After all the corners were sewn, I snipped them off leaving roughly 1/4 of an edge from the seam.  



I then turned the canvas so the seams were on the inside.  Here you can see the 2 inch opening I left in the canvas when I stitched up the sides.  



I placed the canvas inside the fabric and shifted it around until they fit neatly together.  Not sure if you can see in the photo, but the canvas part had the seams facing inside and the fabric had the seams facing outside.  The rights sides of both should be facing each other; this is extremely important.



I stitched along the top edge to secure them both together, making sure to backstitch at the beginning and the end.



Then I reached into the hole on the canvas and pulled the whole thing right side out.  I used a ladder stitch to close up the opening.



I pushed the canvas back inside the fabric.  Look, it's a bucket, perfect for stashing trinkets.  I highly recommend that if you are making one, to just go ahead and make two or three.  
 
10  MASTER CRAFTSTERS / BERNINA 3 Series / Leather Bookmark using the BERNINA 350PE on: May 15, 2012 10:30:01 AM
Sponsored Content
* To see the overview of this Master Craftsters campaign, click here.
* To read more about the machine used in this project, explore BERNINA's website here.

Leather Bookmark using the BERNINA 350PE

I was inspired by this tutorial for using fabric scraps to make pretty paper bookmarks.  But paper isn't very durable so I wanted to see if I could replicate the bookmark in leather.  I wasn't sure if the BERNINA 350 Patchwork Edition would be be able to manage sewing through TWO layers of leather.  I was super excited to find out that the BERNINA 350PE didn't have any issues with it at all.



All I needed to make this bookmark was two leather scraps cut into the shape I wanted my bookmark and a fabric scrap cut slightly smaller than the leather.  I used a pair of scissors to cut out simple leaf shapes in the leather.



I placed the fabric scrap on the wrong side of the leather.



I then placed the second leather piece with the cutouts on top of them.



I straight stitched all around the perimeter of the bookmark.  See how thick the leather is?  



I used the walking foot for the perimeter stitches so the leather wouldn't shift around on me.  It worked quite nicely.



After I stitched around the perimeter, I switched to the regular presser foot.  It is very easy to switch out the feet.  You simply pull the little lever and then pull to remove.  To attach, you push the foot on and then push the lever back over to lock the foot into place.



I straight stitched around the little leaf cutouts.  I'm used snap on sole #20, the open embroidery foot, so I could see the stitches and the leather better.  



I finished with a fancy stem stitch to add a little extra touch.



Oh the possibilities!  I love how this came out!



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