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1  Three-colour dishclot / potholder in Crochet: Completed Projects by TLW on: December 28, 2007 01:48:41 AM
Hello everyone,

My apologies for this long post, but I like it when people 'explain' their choices and difficulties during a project.

Hereby I proudly present, my own, homemade potholders / dishcloths.
I am not quite sure what the correct term should be in English / American.
They are supposed to be used to avoid your hands from getting burned when lifting hot things while cooking.


I used this pattern to figure out how to get the 'angle' in the design:
http://kaleidesigns.com/crochet/patterns/archive/dish005.html.

But mainly it is my own 'design'.
I choose to use three colours, so I could change colour in each row, without needing to 'carry the thread' along each row.
Also, it was the first time that I used 'borders' / edging.
I couldn't understand the instructions in the 'original' pattern, so I tried to find a more understandable (shell) pattern, but I adapted it a little. The original pattern called for skipping two stitches between two adjoining shells. I thought this made the shells too far apart, so I skipped only one.


What I would do different next time (long and rambling):
- Probably use thicker thread (though they are quite capable now, I think it looks nicer)

- In addition to that, use a larger hook. I now used a 3.5 hook, and towards the end, I found that the potholders didn't grow fast enough.

- Use a different 'way of working' for the border. I nowused the dark blue around all corners. Then did the shell-border at the low side, and then I had to start 'again' for the 'hook' on the top. Next time, I think it would be better to do the 'bottom' first, then do one side, then do the 'top' and finally do the last side.
However, if anyone has better ideas, I am all ears.

- Change colour after two rows instead of one (so the individual colours look better individually). If you look in close-up, you can see that no colour can really 'show; itself. I think that from a distance they would still look nice, but from close up they would look nicer.


Ah well, my mother-in-law was very happy with them , and they were put to good use during Christmas (so everyone could get a good look at them).


TLW
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2  My first basic-bird(TM) - or how I started crocheting in Amigurumi: Completed Projects by TLW on: October 29, 2007 02:50:45 PM
Hello everyone,

I started at crocheting about two months ago.
I was trying to think of a way of creating some sort of 'pan-basket' (so we can keep our pans together during the holidays), when I stumbled upon the craftster forum. Not only did it become an instant 'favourite page', I also decided that crochet would be easy enough to learn to fullfill my purposes.

It took me quite some time to really understand how crochet worked. I looked at many different webpages, each of them showing it in a different way and finally I asked my mother (and how delighted she was). After seeing her crochet, especially after trying and re-trying many times myself, it suddenly 'clicked', and now I can do most of the 'simple' stitched fairly easy (though not regularly).

Of course I started on some 'swatches' (I call those 2D-crochet) to practice my stitches, but what I really wanted was to start on the amigurumi (3D crochet). Because they are quick (which is always good for a mind that is easily bored) and I felt they were more 'dynamic' (I tend to get bored with stitching lots of rows without even a change in colour happening).
In addition to that, I have noticed that 'cute looking things' are more forgiving in stich-errors than swatches, where you can see any error immediately. (But that might be just me).

And so two weekends ago, I started (and finished) my first 3D-crochet project: the basic bird.
I am very proud of it (and so is my mother).



It is (as far as I could manage) based on the instructions as given here: http://bittersweetblog.wordpress.com/2007/02/19/birds-of-a-feather/

Any pattern-changes / ommittances are not due to the pattern, but to me. I followed the instructions, but not everything went as smoothly as planned. Mainly because, I had never decreased stitches before, so I just guessed at how to do it. It worked pretty well.

So in the course of two months, I have found myself a new hobby as well as a new side to check out too often.

Thank you very much craftster, for existing, and for reading this slightly rambling post so far.

TLW


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