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1  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / Re: First Hot Process Shampoo Bar! on: February 17, 2011 12:49:20 PM
thanks for the comments!
I'll definitely add more EO's next time! I don't think I added nearly enough  Shocked
When you add the eo's, how long do you have to wait after you turn off the heat? Is there a certain temperature at which you add them? I think I might have added them too soon after cooking as I was anxious to get them in the mould!

I never wait, as soon as the cook is done and I know it's ready for the mold I add my EO/FO, I've never had any flash off. The hotter the soap is, the easier it is to get in the mold so I do it all pretty quickly so I still have some workable goop LOL

Thats good to know- I was quite worried that they had evaporated off! I think I'll try making some more today making some of those changes! Thanks for the help maremare and dawl  Grin
2  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / Re: First Hot Process Shampoo Bar! on: February 17, 2011 12:34:47 AM
thanks for the comments!
I'll definitely add more EO's next time! I don't think I added nearly enough  Shocked
When you add the eo's, how long do you have to wait after you turn off the heat? Is there a certain temperature at which you add them? I think I might have added them too soon after cooking as I was anxious to get them in the mould!
3  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Completed Projects / First Pressed Mineral Makeup!!! (bronzer and eyeshadow)-pic heavy on: February 16, 2011 03:58:08 PM
Hi everyone!

I've been playing around with making mineral makeup for a little while, and recently bought some more ingredients off TKB Trading, so I could make some pressed powders.
So far I have made a pressed bronzer from scratch, as well as attempted a "marbled" pressed eyeshadow.
Here is the bronzer:


I pressed it into an old foundation container I had, using a new 57mm pan from TKB.
I used Mica, Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Stearate, Silica Microspheres, Zinc Oxide and Magnesium Myristate in the base powder, adding colour with oxides and bronze mica.
Instead of using a premade liquid binder, I used organic jojoba oil. Along with the zinc stearate, this is supposed to create a good pressed powder.
I patterned the surface by using a piece of old fabric under gladwrap to press the surface.
Heres a photo of it in use:

I found with using jojoba as a medium for pressing, the powder does come "off" very easily, if that makes sense!
With the premade binder from TKB (http://www.tkbtrading.com/item.php?item_id=1168) which I used in the eyeshadow, the pigment seems more stuck together!

Today I made an eyeshadow. I wanted to make one like those marbleized baked powders you see, like the mac ones, with swirls of different colours that blend on your brush to create a certain colour.
I came up with a colour using pop micas that I like (its a deep gold with a green hue).
Its a mix of blueberry, tangerine and black micas. for the pressing, I mixed each mica seperately with a matching oxide (to make the eyeshadow more pigmented) and the premade E/S base, added the pressing medium to each SEPERATELY. I then put each colour into the pot seperately and mixed together slightly with a toothpick. Then pressed. This is the result (surface doesn't look as nice as right after pressing because I tried it out!):

the bottom of the container gives a better idea of how it looked before I stuck my finger onto the top:

and heres the colour when you swipe ur finger over the top:


It didn't quite work as I would have liked! I ended up with more of a bitsy effect rather than swirled colours. However I do love the end colour, and the tkb pressing medium creates a really nice pressed powder!
Does anyone know how you would make the marbleized effect I'm after? perhaps its not possible with pressing? Maybe the eyeshadow has to be a cream eyeshadow? I don't know

Comments and criticism very welcome!
thanks
ems2801
4  BATH AND BEAUTY / Bath and Beauty: Discussion and Questions / First Hot Process Shampoo Bar! on: February 16, 2011 03:35:16 PM
Hi everyone!
This is my second batch of soap, and my first using the hot process method. Its also my first time making a shampoo bar.
 I used the following recipe, which I adapted from this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58rSuEUjeYo
 
193.6grams (6.8oz) coconut oil
145.2 grams (5.12 oz) Olive Oil
64.4 grams (2.27 oz) Organic Canola Oil
48.4 grams (1.7oz) Castor Oil
48.4 grams (1.7oz) Jojoba Oil

69 grams (2.4oz) Lye
164 grams (5.78oz) water (which I substituted for Rosemary Tea- supposedly good for dark hair)

3.5ml lavendar EO
3.5ml lemon EO

I recalculated the lye amounts using the brambleberry calculator (as I used more coconut and less olive, as I have oily hair) than the original recipe.
I used the crockpot method outlined in the above youtube video.



These are the bars I ended up with (minus one which I have been testing Grin)
I'm happy that I ended up with actual soap- but the smell is not as nice as I had anticipated. It smells quite strange... not bad exactly but not how I would like it to either!!

As for how it works as a shampoo bar- its pretty good. Not too much different from ones that I've bought in the shop- and my hair doesn't look too bad either!

I wonder if anyone could give me any pointers on what I did wrong in terms of scent? I'm thinking maybe it was because I used rosemary tea instead of water (which also must have given the soap that brown colour)? or that I added the EO's while the soap was still too warm and they flashed off? It doesn't smell much like lavendar and lemon!

Thanks for any comments/crits.
ems2801
5  CLOTHING / Clothing: Completed Projects: Reconstructed / Re: Lengthened op-shop jeans for Tall girls!! on: February 12, 2010 06:25:13 PM
Thanks for all the nice comments everyone!  Cheesy I will definitely try to get a tutorial up in the next couple of weeks, I'm currently on the lookout for some jeans I can cut up!
6  CLOTHING / Clothing: Completed Projects: Reconstructed / Re: Lengthened op-shop jeans for Tall girls!! on: February 05, 2010 01:35:36 PM
Thanks for all the nice comments everyone  Cheesy I'm glad there's other people that will find a use for this!
7  CLOTHING / Clothing: Completed Projects: Reconstructed / Lengthened op-shop jeans for Tall girls!! on: February 04, 2010 11:18:36 PM
I always find it really hard to buy jeans that are long enough for me, without going to the specialty shops which cost a fortune that a poor student cannot afford  Tongue  I had this idea in my head for a while, and finally got round to buying some cheap ($5NZD) jeans from the op-shop and transforming them into TALL JEANS!!

Here's the before (about 10cm too short and flared (ignore the pins!))


And the after:





It was pretty simple to do, I just sewed on some cuffs I made from some scrap denim I had, that had the same "inside" colour (the outside colour is actually very different!), then turned the cuffs up to cover the added part. The trick is to get the detail of the seam just like the original, so when you turn the cuffs the inside seam looks authentic.
Comments and criticism very much appreciated.
If anyone else has the problem of not being able to buy long enough jeans and would like a tute I'd be happy to make one up...I'm already on the lookout for more jeans  Grin
8  FIBER ARTS / Spinning: Discussion and Questions / Re: Learn To Spin 2010: Source your tools on: January 25, 2010 11:48:54 PM
I am in the North Island Grin I just looked up majacraft now; they have some beautiful wool available! Next time I'll have to look at getting some of that  Wink
9  FIBER ARTS / Spinning: Discussion and Questions / Re: Learn To Spin 2010: Source your tools on: January 25, 2010 03:25:12 PM
I love to join in too!!  Grin I managed to buy some wool (mixed shades of green) and supplies for making the spindle today at Spotlight. For anyone who's in NZ, I also saw someone selling Ashford slivers on trademe (an online auction site) in many different colours in 100g lots. Too many colours for me to make a decision on!
10  HOME SWEET HOME / Interior Decorating: Completed Projects / Re: Black ConTact paper wardrobe art+more (pic heavy) on: February 21, 2009 10:09:44 PM
Thanks for the nice comments everyone!  Grin
Quote from: SkyyAngellink=topic=292952.msg3330073#msg3330073 date=1235015387
Ooh pretty! I too love the whiteboard border!! How did you do the repeating pattern?

I thought I'd do a quick 'paint' diagram to show how I made the whiteboard border. It takes a little planning, and then quite a lot of cutting out Wink but its worth it in the end. I thought it might also be cool to make a little frame on a wall with an actual photo in it too...

Anyway, first I searched google images to find a "baroque" style frame. I found an image I liked (sorry, I can't actually find it anymore!) similar to this one:
http://www.ochigo.co.uk/acatalog/baroq-photo-frame-blk-2.jpg
and copied+pasted into paint where I enlarged a section (half of one side of the frame- as the side is symmetrical) plus a corner (seperately), printed it and then cut them both out. This meant I had a section I could repeat.
Then I measured the sides of my whiteboard, and calculated how many 'repeats' I would need for each side. e.g for the long side I needed 4 and a bit cut outs.
Then I outlined/traced the cutout onto the back of the conTact paper (its like duraseal to cover books with- it has a paper backing you peel off and can draw on). You have to remember that what you trace will come out backwards when you cut it out! And cut them out with scissors. Then using a stanley knife, cut out all the inside parts.
Here is a "rough" outline of my corner and side repeat parts.

Note: if you can its best to draw as many of the outlines together as you can across the width of the paper so you have less visible attachment lines when you stick them up. I attached the corner bits to the vertical side pieces (not to the horizontal ones!).
This shows how I placed the cutouts around the frame:

Remember you have to flip the side piece cutout when drawing next to the 'original' piece as you want the pattern to be symmetrical and repeating.
When you find a gap that is too small for an entire side piece, I just guessed at it, and semi altered the side piece so it looked like they flowed into the next piece.
When you are ready to attach to the wall, just peel off the backing and smooth onto the wall. You can remove if you did it wrong, and replace.
I hope that hekps! If anyone has any questions please ask  Wink
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