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1  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Completed Projects / Gene Simmons Garden Gnome on: October 11, 2014 09:01:31 PM
And finished as of tonight...the Gene Simmons/The Demon garden gnome!

This guy was actually bought on my birthday this year, with money from my father, from an antiques store in Virginia Beach. He's actually a larger version of a gnome I repainted earlier this year. He's just shy of 16" tall, and was a little sunbaked when I found him,





This gnome actually gave me the biggest fits, when it came to getting the paint to dry, because he's made out of some kind of vinyl. Note to self: never use enamel Testor's paint ever again!

For him, I used the Super Sculpey to smooth out where his vest and shirt ended, because he was going to have a pretty significant belt. All of this made him very front heavy. I wanted to use the tool handle he still had in his hand to make him a bass guitar to hold, but because of his front weight, he would have just tipped over with a bass attached to his little gnome body.
2  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Completed Projects / Peter Criss Garden Gnome on: October 11, 2014 08:41:14 PM
After months of painting and getting pissed off, my Peter Criss/The Cat KISS garden gnome is finally finished!!!

I was on Craftster one evening, earlier this year, and I had posted the leprechaun gnome I had repainted, in honor of my mom. Redforkhippie gave me an idea, based on some gnomes she had painted: KISS army gnomes! The creative wheels were set in motion.

I went yardsaling with a friend and her aunt shortly after that. I wasn't able to find any gnomes to buy, but her aunt, Lorna, gave me a gnome she had and no longer wanted. This is actually the second gnome I got for this project, but he was finished first. He is 16" tall.



Lorna had tried repainting him herself but she wasn't happy with the outcome. This little guy was originally a $19.99 gnome from K-Mart, The label was still on the turtle's underside.

I originally wanted mustache-free gnomes, but this guy just begged to be painted as Peter Criss as the Catman.

I used some Super Sculpey to smooth out some areas of his blousey sleeves, and then more to build up his boot tops, gauntlets and the front of his little shirt. After that, I primed him very thoroughly.



My husband didn't seem to understand why I was building up different parts of his clothes. I tried explaining to him the gnomes were not going to be perfect KISS lookalikes,but rather gnomes that wanted to look like KISS, so they were keeping their own little gnome styles but were influenced by KISS. He didn't really get it until I was finished painting them, and he was able to see the finished project.



The metallic silver Testor's paint I bought wasn't drying/curing on the gnomes. The gnomes were clean (this guy is resin), I primed him first...but the silver still wasn't curing. I've even ran an embossing gun over them to speed dry. The silver remained tacky.

So I went online and tried to figure out what's going on. "When paint is not drying on the surface, the most common cause is that the wrong paint was applied. When painting flexible vinyl or rubber, our solvent based enamel will not dry. A water based acrylic paint should be used. Dry time on acrylics is about 15 minutes minutes and enamels are dry to the touch between 30 minutes to 1 hour." what I think really happened was the three coats of clear spray paint dried here over the tacky, uncured enamel paint.
3  Halloween / Halloween Decor and Parties / Getting Ready for Halloween Indoor Decorating on: September 22, 2014 06:57:56 PM
I've been popping in and out of Michael's Arts and Crafts a lot more than usual lately. There's one not too far away from where I work (my favorite store, A.C. Moore, doesn't have a location out that way). And even though I know I have to work on Halloween night, that didn't stop me from picking up a new decoration.

Michael's had plaster skulls and monster heads on sale. I had to have the monster head, because I don't have anything Frankenstein-related yet. I know, it's hard to believe.




Frankie here was painted with both Testor's model car paint (that I bought for another project, the gnomes that are giving me hell) and Folk Art craft paint. I was going for a sickly pale monster green, by combining a flesh color, white and green of the Folk Art paint. When it was all said and done, in the light of my kitchen....er, painting studio...Frankie actually has a bit of a pale, sickly blue tint to him and I really like it (think Tom Savini's make up work on the original "Dawn of the Dead," in 1978.

I'm not a great painter, but I was happy that I was able to get some differences in skin tone. While I was able to create some highlights on the face, I had a hard time creating depth. I wanted him to have bags under his eyes and hollow cheeks. I couldn't get his cheek to be any more gaunt, but I think the eyes have a good start on them. I even made it a point to brush on various shades of green eye shadow under his eyes and on his cheeks  to show depth, but I can't get him any thinner.

I did think about clear coating him, kind of the cheap woman's clear glaze, but I decided against it. I've decided I like this kind of chalky finish that he has.

I thought a lot about my paternal grandma while I was working on this project. She passed away about three years ago. I would admit that during the last 13-15 years, I didn't have much to do with her, mostly because of how she treated people and how I didn't like it.

When I was a little kid, she had a corner of the basement that was her own ceramics studio. She even had her own kiln down there and shelves loaded with unpainted ceramics and molds.  I thought it was the coolest thing in the world! I still have the peg light Christmas tree she made for my family in 1978, and a couple other small pieces.  I used to beg her almost every time I saw her to do some kind of ceramics project with me, but she never would. She always said it was too expensive. I would have loved to sit down there and paint with her.
4  HOME SWEET HOME / Crafty Housewares: Completed Projects: General / Finished My Seashell Wreath on: June 21, 2014 06:24:02 PM
My boss had a really nice seashell wreath in her house that she made a few years ago. I was amazed by it and I needed to have one for myself.

Here is mine. The materials for it came from AC Moore (for the grape vine wreath), 2 beaches in Norfolk, 2 beaches in Virginia Beach, and 2 shells I had from the Tampa/Clearwater area from several years ago.



Everything is hot glued on. It took a lot of soaking in soapy water and then Lysol to get rid of the stink on these shells. The weird thing is that the items I picked up in Virginia Beach smelled worse than the items I picked up in Norfolk.

I've got:
  • two different kinds of sea grass
    feathers
    pieces of driftwood
    various shells (some are mussels)
    horseshoe crab shells
    various other crab shells
    mermaid purses
    1 piece of sea glass
    1 Corona extra bottle cap
    a couple of rocks
    some barnacles

This is my boss's wreath, by the way. She said she loves a good hot glue gun project! Smiley

5  HOME SWEET HOME / Exterior Decorating / Yard Art / Gardening: Completed Projects / Finished Fixing Mom's Flamingo on: June 02, 2014 07:39:53 PM
My mom passed away in November last year. She wanted us to wait until we could all be together, in the spring, to spread her ashes (my husband is in the military and his CO wouldn't let him come home before she passed). So we got together in April to take care of her one last time. One of the things we brought back from our trip home was a heavy stone flamingo that belonged to my mom. It was a little rough looking. having spent at least one Iowa winter outside and several Iowa summers baking outside in the heat.


That one winter it sat outdoors for is what helped to break it's neck. Luckily for me, there is some kind of rebar inside the neck, so everything held together in the bed of the truck on the way back here.

I used a Walgreens knock off of Gorilla Glue, which I was very happy with. The Python Glue is actually thinner and less "foamy" than the Gorilla brand. A couple applications inside the crack was enough to secure the break, but it wasn't enough to disguise it.

For that, I needed to make a couple thin clay collars for it from Sculpey. And since it's oven bake clay, I had to breal down and buy an embossing/heat gun to cure it.


Then I did a quick and dirty paint job on it to set my base colors: just a bright pink for the body and a hunter green for the base. I didn't do any detail work with it. It was just two cans of spray paint.

I painted everything else by brush last night with other colors for the details.




I think my mom would approve of this. I had asked her once before if she'd let me fix it for her and she said no at the time. Now, you've got to get right up on it to see where the thickness and smoothness of the neck changes where the clay and the stone come together.
6  HOME SWEET HOME / Interior Decorating: Completed Projects / Refinished My First Piece of Furniture on: January 29, 2014 12:51:50 PM
I had this bench for about four months before I started working on it. I've been messing around with it, off and on, since April 2013, and now because of the glory that is a snow day, the bench has been completed....finally. Besides, I need to do something besides shop online...eBay and Amazon can be a dangerous combination! Smiley

As a refresher, here is the before picture. Excuse my shadow. It was late in the day when I took this picture and my back was to the west.



I wore out my husband's electric sander. I think this has about 4-5 coats of stain and 2 coats of polyurethane on it.

This is the after picture. I used curtain tiebacks to secure the cushions to the arm supports. I also bought four more to take apart and use as trim to hide the staples in the back cushions (the back of the bench is actually completely open through the wood, so it basically looks the same on the backside).



My friends lovingly this "the toilet," because I actually turned it into a bench with shallow storage space under the cushions. There's a hinged lid in the center of the bench. Originally, there were just batting, springs and horse hair under the original fabric.

There's a handful of things I would have liked to have done differently/better, but this is the first piece of furniture I've ever redone so I'm still pretty proud of it.
7  CROCHET / Crochet: Completed Projects / Supersize Shrug Me! on: January 26, 2014 08:01:20 AM
Recently, I completed a shrug. It's not my usual piece of clothing, but I came across the crochet pattern for the Lion Brand Heartland Sunset Shrug (Pattern Number: L32035). You normally need a user name and password for the Lion Brand patterns, but since I'm going to break this pattern down, you'll see my thoughts and changes here.

This pattern is not something of Lion Brand's caliber, in my opinion. While the pattern itself is super simple, I think Lion Brand dropped the ball on it quite a bit. It's not as high a quality that their patterns usually tend to be. I don't know if it's because of the skill level or if it's just written poorly.

SKILL LEVEL: Easy + (Level 3)--This is actually correct. There are no complicated stitches to learn. It is just a big ole circle, so as long as you an count, ANY crocheter, at ANY level, should be able to make this with ease.



SIZE: One Size--WRONG. If I had followed the directions from Lion Brand, I would have looked like a sausage wearing a too small casing. You will need to complete almost all of the pattern to figure out how much more, if any, rows you should add on.

Personally, I can wear size large shirts, but I prefer extra larges. There's no way the original pattern size would have fit me, so I'm guessing their model was extremely petite.

About 38 in. (96.5 cm) diameter, before folding and seaming--This is the original size. I didn't think to measure my circle before seaming.

I used an H sized hook, which is the recommended size. Lion Brand used 5 yarns, and I used 4. You can use any number of yarns you want, you'll just need to figure out the pattern. I was changing colors every six rows. This is what I used:

--Caron Simply Soft in neon yellow (#9773)-1 skein
--Caron Simply Soft in neon orange (#9774)-1 skein
--Caron Simply Soft in neon coral (#9772)-1 1/2 skeins
--Caron Simply Soft in neon pink (#9775)-1 skein

I actually had all of these before choosing this pattern. I saw them at the arts and crafts store I work at, and I knew I had to have them for a sweater for myself! Smiley

STITCH EXPLANATION:
beg-Cl (beg cluster) Ch 2, yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook (2 loops rem on hook); yarn over, insert hook in same st and draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook, yarn over and draw through all 3 loops on hook.

Cl (cluster) Yarn over, insert hook in indicated st and draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook (2 loops rem on hook), *yarn over, insert hook in same st and draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook; rep from * once more, yarn over and draw through all loops on hook.

NOTES:
1. Shrug is worked in joined rnds beg at center. Do not turn at the end of rnds.
2. Color is changed by fastening off old color and joining new color.
3. Piece is folded and 2 side seams sewn to create armholes.--This was difficult to understand, even with the directions that came at the end of the pattern. This was the most difficult thing about the pattern.


SHRUG
Center Motif--I especially like how this looks.
With A, ch 5.
Rnd 1 (RS): Dc in 5th ch from hook (beg ch counts as dc, ch 1), (ch 1, dc in same ch) 6 times, ch 1; join with sl st in 4th ch of beg ch - 8 dc and 8 ch-1 sps at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 2: Ch 4 (counts as dc, ch 1 in this rnd and in all following rnds), dc in first ch-1 sp, (ch 1, dc in next dc, ch 1, dc in next ch-1 sp) 7 times, ch 1; join with sl st in 3rd ch of beg ch - 16 dc and 16 ch-1 sps at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 3: Beg-Cl in same st as joining, *ch 2, sk next ch-1 sp, Cl in next dc; rep from * around, ch 2, sk last ch-1 sp; join with sl st in beg-Cl - 16 Cl and 16 ch-2 sps at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 4: Ch 3 (counts as dc in this rnd and in all following rnds), 3 dc in first ch-2 sp, *dc next Cl, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp; repeat from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 64 dc at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 5: Ch 3, (tr, dc, hdc) in same st as joining, sk next st, sc in next st, *sk next st, (hdc, dc, tr, dc, hdc) in next st, sk next st, sc in next st; repeat from * around to last st, sk last st, (hdc, dc) in same st as joining; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 16 (hdc, dc, tr, dc, hdc) groups and 16 sc at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 6: (Sl st, ch 1, sc) in first tr, *ch 5, sk next 5 sts, sc in next tr; repeat from * around to last 5 sts, ch 5, sk last 5 sts; join with sl st in first sc - 16 sc and 16 ch-5 sps. Fasten off.
Body of Shrug--Again, there is NO WAY this is "one size fits all."
Rnd 7: From RS, draw up a loop of B in any ch-5 sp, ch 3 (counts as dc in this rnd and in all following rnds), 6 dc in same ch-5 sp, 7 dc in each ch-5 sp around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 112 dc at the end of this rnd.
Rnd 8: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining (increase made), dc in next 6 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 6 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 128 sts.
Rnd 9: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 7 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 7 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 144 sts.
Rnd 10: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 8 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 8 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 160 sts.
Rnd 11: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 9 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 9 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 176 sts.
Rnd 12: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 10 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 10 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 192 sts.
Rnd 13: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 11 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 11 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 208 sts. Fasten off.
Rnd 14: From RS, draw up a loop of C in same st as joining, ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 12 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 12 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 224 sts.
Rnd 15: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 13 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 13 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 240 sts.
Rnd 16: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 14 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 14 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 256 sts.
Rnd 17: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 15 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 15 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 272 sts.
Rnd 18: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 16 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 16 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 288 sts.
Rnd 19: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 17 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 17 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 304 sts.
Rnd 20: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 18 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 18 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 320 sts. Fasten off.
Rnd 21: From RS, draw up a loop of D in same st as joining, ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 19 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 19 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 336 sts.
Rnd 22: Ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, dc in next 20 sts, *2 dc in next st, dc in next 20 sts; rep from * around; join with sl st in top of beg ch - 352 sts.
Rnd 23:Ch 3, dc in each dc around; join with sl st in top of beg ch.--I don't know if this is a mistake or intentional. It looks odd when you do this row like this. I'm thinking the this should read: Ch 3, working in the back loops only, dc in each dc around; join with sl st in top of beg ch. This would continue the pattern.

At this point, throw the circle over your back to get an idea of how big you need to make your shrug. Flip down the back a bit from your neck to figure out where your collar will be, as well. If you need to do additional rows, work them in increasing rows, such as 21, 22, 23, etc. I made my shrug up to 24 dc around, but I really should have stopped at 21 or 22. As the shrug hangs (both from creating it and from wearing it), you'll see it stretches, so you don't need it to be huge because it could become huge on it's own. That's okay.
Border
Rnd 24 (RS): With D, ch 3, working in back loops only, dc in same st as joining, 2 dc in next st, *sk next 2 sts, 2 dc in each of next 2 sts; repeat from * around to last 2 sts, sk last 2 sts; join with sl st in top of beg ch. Fasten off.
Rnd 25: From RS, draw up a loop of E in sp between sts of any 2-dc group, ch 3, dc in same sp, 2 dc in sp between sts of each 2-dc group around; join with sl st in top of beg ch.
Rnds 26-29: Sl st in sp between sts of first 2-dc group, ch 3, dc in same sp, 2 dc in sp between sts of each 2-dc group around; join with sl st in top of beg ch. Fasten off.
Rnd 30: With B, rep Rnd 25. Fasten off.
FINISHING
Fold piece in half. With fold at top, measure 8 in. (20.5 cm) down from fold on each side and place marker for armholes. Measure 6 in. (15 cm) along edge below each marker and place another marker. Baste or pin edges together between markers and try Shrug on to check fit. Adjust marker position if desired, then sew edges together between markers on both sides. Weave in ends.

Ignore all this. This is what I came up with. Throw the shrug back over your shoulders and flip the collar back. For mine, I made the edge of the collar touch  the edge of the center motif, but remember, my shrug's bigger than I thought it would be. If you can see where your joining stitches are for each row, make that run up your back. You'll be able to disguise that later on, if you need to do so.

It would help if you had another person for this part, but if you don't, you can do this facing a large mirror. You'll need stitch markers and a tape measure. Raise one of your arms to a 45 degree angle. With your free hand, pinch where you want the width of the sleeve to be. Mark the spot with the stitch marker. Measure the width of the sleeve and repeat it on the other side.

I thought this looked a little unfinished after row 30, for a Lion Brand pattern, so I went back and did one more row of sc in each stitch around, and then I finished it off. This row of sc was also used to secure the sleeves, first around the body of the shrug, and then back around the sleeves separately.

I also went back and used a yarn needle and a length of yarn and secured the back collar with a few stitches. This will keep it from flopping around, and you'll always know which end is the top.
8  HOME SWEET HOME / Exterior Decorating / Yard Art / Gardening: Completed Projects / A New Garden Gnome on: December 26, 2013 10:01:24 AM
This is actually my second refurbished gnome. The first one was a broken gnome on clearance from Wal-Mart that I zombified.

Here's this little guy's back story. In September, I had a shitty time at a oceanfront concert, left early, and went to an antiques store in Virginia Beach to window shop. I went back a second time shortly after that and realized they had a good number of garden gnomes. I went back a third time, and picked this little guy up. He's probably about 10 inches tall.



He was made by Artline in 1992, according to the markings on the underside of his feet. He was holding a tool or something at some point, which broke, but I can't get the rest of the handle out of his hand. He was originally marked at $16, then $6 and I got him for $5.50.

My grandma had an Artline cookie jar of Mickey Mouse when I was a kid made out of the same plasticy stuff as the gnome, so that's why I recognized the Artline brand immediately.

He's cute, but a little too "Disney/Snow White and the Seven Dwarves" for my own taste. I was going to do him as Uncle Sam, but then inspiration struck: he needed to be a leprechaun gnome, in honor of my mom whose birthday was St. Patrick's Day. He is a complete repaint, all the way around. He actually needed a lot of primer for some reason to get started.



Even though it's not St. Patrick's Day, this little guy lives on my front step, along with a repaired Steelers football player gnome (he kept breaking and I separated him from the other gnomes...I think they've been beating him up) and the pooping  gnome my husband got me. Smiley
9  HOME SWEET HOME / Exterior Decorating / Yard Art / Gardening: Completed Projects / Lawn of the Dead on: September 08, 2013 01:13:01 PM
I can't take credit for this post title. I saw it somewhere on Deviant Art and I liked it.



About three weeks ago, I picked up a little garden gnome statue, about 8-10" tall, at Wal-Mart on clearance for $4.50 (regularly $9.99). It has a red glass mosaic hat. which was a little crumbly at the top. It also had two holes in the booty.

This was a complete repaint, from hat brim all the way down. He was repainted with some primer and a bunch of different craft paints.

The red drips coming down his hat serve an actual purpose. Before I started painting him, I used my hit glue gun to fill in the crumbled spots of glass, to secure it all. Then, I used the red craft paint in the squeeze bottle to cover up the hot glue. I also used hot glue to fill in the holes in his booty.

I'm very happy with how he turned out. I'd been wanting a zombie gnome for some time now. I just couldn't bring myself to buy one from Etsy when I know how easy garden gnomes are to find in the stores.

The ribs and the arm bones were made with a glue gun and then the glue was painted. I did about four coats of clear coat on him to protect him once he became my front door sentry.

My only problem now will be deciding, will he stay outside year round, or will I bring him in after Halloween?




10  CLOTHING / Clothing for Kids: Completed Projects / A Trio of Customized Baby Onsies on: September 01, 2013 06:37:01 PM
A friend of mine, Brandon, and his wife recently had a baby boy. By recently, I mean about three months ago, they had their kid. I'm a little late with the baby gift, but I finally finished it tonight.

Brandon is wild about the Punisher like I am for Spider-Man. As soon as I found out they had a baby boy, I knew I had to make a couple of Punisher-themed onsies. Oh hell, who am I kidding? If they'd had a little girl, I would have made them with pink skulls...and maybe one with a bow.

Thanks to iron on fusing, some black fabric in my stash (from a Doctor Who swap I participated in last year), and my computer, I made three customized onsies. I checked Yahoo images for Punisher logos. Another friend picked out a package of three onsies for me (I don't know how to shop for kids' clothes. She made it easy for me and picked up a set that the little babino could grow into), I picked three different logos. I bet you money that Brandon can look at each logo and tell me exactly when each one was introduced.

I ironed out the onsies and measured across the chest to get the right size for the transfers. I used Publisher to size them out right and printed them out in greyscale. I used the fusable interface to turn the fabric into iron on's. After they were ironed to the onsies, I used my sewing machine to do a blanket stitch all the way around the skulls and eyes (I didn't do the nostrils...those were too damn small to sew).

I'm getting together with Brandon and his wife next weekend. They don't know what the gift is, only that it's something "Brandon-themed."





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