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1  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Screen Printing: Completed Projects / Re: Emulsion-Free Screen Printing (Yudu hack) - mini tutorial on: July 21, 2013 05:15:25 PM
I've been trying to figure out how "permanent" the permanent adhesive is.  I tried putting a small piece on my shirt and it peeled away quite easily without leaving any residue.  I think I'm going to experiment with cutting out an image with the permanent vinyl and applying it to the fabric like a stencil, then use the same image (and ink and old t-shirt) with the re-positional stuff on the Yudu screen.  They probably won't look the same because of the different techniques, but I don't want to risk the screen just yet. I'm just glad you demonstrated a technique I can use to get just a few prints without breaking the bank.  The whole photo emulsion thing just costs too much!
2  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Screen Printing: Discussion and Questions / thinner, red emulsion sheets on: July 13, 2013 12:20:46 PM
Since Yudu emulsion sheets are way too expensive, I've looked for alternatives.  Liquid emulsion will only last in the fridge for about 4 months once it's mixed, so it doesn't look particularly cheap unless you do a lot of silk screening.  I do all types of crafts, so I know I wouldn't use the liquid up.  I've seen other sheets that are a lot cheaper than the Yudu's which are red and a couple of microns thinner than the green.  Has anyone used these and, if so, what do you think?  If a packet of 10 sheets will last 4-6 months in black packaging, it may be the cheapest way for a hobbyist to go IF it actually works.  Any thoughts?
3  IMAGE REPRODUCTION TECHNIQUES / Screen Printing: Completed Projects / Re: Emulsion-Free Screen Printing (Yudu hack) - mini tutorial on: July 12, 2013 02:07:17 PM
What type of vinyl adhesive do you think is safe for the Yudu screens?  I saw a guy on YouTube who used vinyl, but he didn't say what type (just "regular sign vinyl").  I've got both repositional and permanent vinyl and don't want to screw up my screens with the permanent if I should avoid it.  The only reason I'd use the permanent is 'cause I have it and won't be using it up anytime soon. Any advice?
4  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Discussion and Questions / Re: stiff backing material on: August 12, 2012 10:32:23 AM
Thanks for the feedback!  Cheesy  I've checked and I can get the nylon washers at Lowes; if they take to the glue OK, they would also give me a hole to put a brad through! 

I had thought about trying resin, though, as with the Apoxie Sculpt, that would be a new area for me.  I'm afraid I'd spend too much decorating time trying to get that part right.  Someday, perhaps, but that's not where my "muse" is right now.

Thanks again for the great feedback!
5  JEWELRY AND TRINKETS / Trinkets and Jewelry: Discussion and Questions / stiff backing material on: August 10, 2012 09:42:04 AM
I want to make some attractive "things" to attach to fabric that's been sewn on velcroe that will be used on replaceable strap flip flops.  Therefore, the backing needs to be lightweight, but sturdy.  The base will be glued or sewn on, so it needs to be able to take apoxy or fabric glue.  I'll be using beads, rinestones, yarn, fabric, etc. to decorate the "things". The best I've come up with so far are large, inexpensive buttons, but I was hoping there was something out there that was thinner, but almost as sturdy.  Metal washers were also something I was thinking of, but they'd be too heavy.  Any suggestions from more experienced "jewerly and trinket" makers?
6  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Discussion and Questions / Re: custom sign holders? on: July 12, 2011 03:40:28 PM
You might think about printing the sign out and using self-laminating sheets to cover them and taping them up with removable, double-sided tape (makes them easier to replace).  If you need them sturdy, try cutting foam board to fit the sign THEN applying the self-laminating sheet, mounting with picture hangers.  Can't cut the foam board in a straight line?  Contact copy shops 'til you find one that will cut it for you (probably won't take long to find one.)  Can you tell I've done this sort of thing before?
7  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Discussion and Questions / Re: Button Maker? on: July 12, 2011 03:29:22 PM
I've had one for 10+ years and it works just fine!  I've used it mainly at school (I'm a psychologist at a large university) to advertise events.  I also used it for a Halloween costume.  I'd suggest thinking about what you'd use it for and how often.  I've had it for forever and am still working on the supplies that came with it!  Was it worth the money?  I love crafty things and if I use it more than once, I think it's worth it.  Obviously, I've used it more than once.
8  MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS / Discussion and Questions / Re: Craft Ideas for someone with Arthritis. please? on: July 12, 2011 03:21:19 PM
(It sucks that no one has replied to you yet!!!  I'm a knitter/spinner/weaver, so I'm usually on Raverly and just saw your message today.)  Sorry, but anything that uses your hands is going to hurt.  The best you can probably do is rotate what you're doing so that you use different muscles in different ways.  Also, get a great deal of rest between projects and try to minimize how much you need to use your hands to do non-fun stuff.  For example, I've got voice recognition software (Dragon) to reduce the amount of typing I have to do and use an ergonomic keyboard when I have to correct it. I also find that heat helps better than cold when I'm resting my wrists, but I've got OA; you'll need to experiment to find what works best for you.  There are groups on Raverly dedicated to knitters with Arthritis who would give you more tips, so you may want to check there as well.
9  HOME SWEET HOME / Pet-Related Crafts: Discussion and Questions / Re: doggie diapers? on: May 05, 2011 08:08:29 AM
You didn't say what type of craft you want to use.  If you knit or crochet, there are patterns on Ravelry for both male and female pooches in the group "PupPee Power."  I have used both patterns for my two rescues who will not be housebroken.  It takes awhile to get a perfect fit, but now I just keep churning them out so I don't have to run the washer is often.  One variation I use is to cut up maximum strength Poise pads instead of using towels/rags to soak up the urine.  The Poise pads are less likely to create "contact leakage," which is when the urine seeps into the knitted cover and leaves a mark when the dog sits.  It happens more with my male dog because it's a little harder to keep the pad centered and the little guy (16 pounds) really knows how to pee!  I tighten up the areas between the legs (female) and surrounding the pad (male) by using 2MM elastic cord woven through the outside edge.  The Poise pads have some kind of material that traps the urine even though the path has been cut.  If the cut pad gets overly filled, it will sometimes leave flakes of the lining in the knitted cover.  I've never had any trouble with it just washing down the drain.  I hope this is helpful!
10  HOME SWEET HOME / Pet-Related Crafts: Discussion and Questions / Re: Looking for a Pattern for Dog Diapers on: May 05, 2011 08:07:10 AM
You didn't say what type of craft you want to use.  If you knit or crochet, there are patterns on Ravelry for both male and female pooches in the group "PupPee Power."  I have used both patterns for my two rescues who will not be housebroken.  It takes awhile to get a perfect fit, but now I just keep churning them out so I don't have to run the washer is often.  One variation I use is to cut up maximum strength Poise pads instead of using towels/rags to soak up the urine.  The Poise pads are less likely to create "contact leakage," which is when the urine seeps into the knitted cover and leaves a mark when the dog sits.  It happens more with my male dog because it's a little harder to keep the pad centered and the little guy (16 pounds) really knows how to pee!  I tighten up the areas between the legs (female) and surrounding the pad (male) by using 2MM elastic cord woven through the outside edge.  The Poise pads have some kind of material that traps the urine even though the path has been cut.  If the cut pad gets overly filled, it will sometimes leave flakes of the lining in the knitted cover.  I've never had any trouble with it just washing down the drain.  I hope this is helpful!
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