Look What I Made with a Dremel! – How to Make a Spoon Pendant

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LOOK WHAT I MADE WITH A DREMEL

Spoon Pendants by Jean

Jean aka Sweets4ever In this article, I share a nifty tutorial on how to make a spoon pendant (as well as a few other variations made with the same process!). My inspiration was this project by Craftster member rhodora. rhodora used a jewelry saw to create her pendant, but since I don’t have access to one, I turned to my trusty Dremel!

I use my Dremel for all sorts of crafty purposes such as glass etching, polishing, carving and making recycled jewelry. I’ve created some really awesome Altoid tin pieces by stripping the paint and engraving gorgeous and intricate little patterns on them with the Dremel. Around our house, I’ve used the Dremel for installing wall outlets, repair work on our motorcycles, and THE BEST THING EVER, re-slotting stripped screws.

Jean's Creations

Star Spoon Keychain
Star Keychain
Turtle Shrink Plastic Pendant
Shrink Plastic Embellished Pendant
Spoon Suncatcher
Jewelled Suncatcher
Tree Spoon Pendant
Tree Pendant

A FREE TUTORIAL BY JEAN

Project Supplies Supplies:

Dremel 688-01 Cut-off Wheel Accessory Set
Safety glasses
Dremel
Tungsten Carbide Cutter accessory (bit)
Spoons (stainless steel in this instance)
Pliers
Marker

Step 1 Step One:

Design an image on the spoon with a marker.

Step 1 Part Two The possibilities are endless for designs! Think of abstract images, symbols, holidays or just simple and fun shapes.
Step 2 Step Two:

Cut your image from the spoon. I use a Tungsten Carbide Cutter for this step. Make an initial hole in the spoon and then slowly work outward until your entire image is detailed. I find it helpful to secure the spoon in a workbench with clamps for this step.

Step 3 Step Three:

Have fun by creating swirls, texture and designs with other attachments. I like to create a hammered appearance on some of my pieces. This will eliminate any accident scratches or marks on your piece as well.

Step 4 Step Four:

Cut the handle of the spoon with a Dremel Cut-Off Wheel. Be sure to leave enough handle to create a loop at the top of the pendant.

Step 5 Step Five:

Use pliers to bend the top of the spoon to create a loop. Depending on your strength and the thickness of your spoon, you may need to use gloves or two pairs of pliers for this step. Make your bends slowly. Be careful not to bend back and forth too quickly or you might break the neck of the spoon.

If the pliers make marks on your spoon, just repeat Step Three.

Finished Pendant Completed Project!

Add a ribbon, chain or cord and your necklace is complete!

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36 Comments

  1. pops says:

    aha! and my dh thinks the dremel is his ;) not for much longer! fantastic stuff :)

  2. Krafty_Karasu says:

    I’ve been needing a reason to go out and buy silverware to play with. I’ve also been needing a reason to use my Dremel. now I have one!!!!!! this is a fantastic idea! thanks for sharing!

  3. doaflip says:

    Lovely! As if I didn’t want a Dremel enough already. *sigh*

  4. MareMare says:

    Lovely! I always hear about Dremels but didn’t know all the ways they could be used!

  5. KiwiDragons says:

    Oohhh, my Dremel just died. I guess now I really need to go out and get another one. I used to only use it for trimming my dog’s toenails, but this is even better. :)

  6. sweets4ever says:

    Yay, glad you guys like it! They’re so easy and fun to make.

  7. Gab says:

    Well done – they’re cool :)

    You’re obviously skilled with the dremel, but in case you’d like to be able to add finer detail (eg. corners at the edge rather than curves), a jeweller’s saw’s actually not that expensive an item. I’m in Australia, so prices may be different, but maybe $50?

    The blades themselves can add up, but that really depends on how much and how well you use them (you’ll find they break a bit till you get used to them).

    Of course, you never know what’s expensive to someone else, or how much they’d use something, so it may not be necessary or worth it to you, but just in case :)

  8. sweets4ever says:

    Thanks, Gab! That’s really good info! I have so many bits and attachments for the Dremel that I tend to try to make it work for so many random uses. I’ll have to put a jeweler’s saw on my crafty wishlist, too!

  9. SevsOnlyGirl says:

    Cute idea! I’ve used hubby’s dremel for many things, but this one would be the most fun!

  10. hrsg says:

    Jean
    These are all great projects, and I too use my Dremel for everything!

  11. onyxnox says:

    PERFECT TIMING!!!!! DH just got me a Dremel for my birthday a couple of weeks ago and I remembered this project but could not find it – as soon as I get some time, I will be playing with my Dremel and this will be one of the ways! Thanks!

  12. Ellie says:

    This is an amazing little project think i might have to rethink what i want for christmas! :D

  13. sweets4ever says:

    onyxnox, I hope you’ll post yours on the boards. I’d love to see what you create! And, happy belated birthday!! :)

  14. Lauren says:

    yet another reason to run out and buy a dremel! <3 great idea!!

  15. Debbie says:

    I have been using my dremel mainly for gourd projects but this idea is awesome! I will definitely try my hand at making some of these….Thanks for the inspiration!

  16. Beph says:

    I couldn’t help but to mention this on my blog.

  17. Christian says:

    awesome!

  18. DancinInTheDark says:

    You are amazing! Now I want a Dremel so I can do that cool stuff. ;)

  19. Tracy says:

    This year I couldn’t figure out the one thing I really wanted for Christmas, until I saw your necklaces. Now I want a Dremel!!!!!!

  20. Sharon says:

    You are so special… thank you.. I have been using my dremel for … a long time.. but have limited myself to carving.. such things as deer antlers, and soft type wood.. but never used it on metal.. YOU are inspiring.. Thank YOU… Wahooo… another new project to try………….Smiles

  21. sweets4ever says:

    Thanks, Beph!!

  22. sweets4ever says:

    Wow, thank you so much, Sharon! These are really fun, quick and so easy to make. The possibilities for designs are fairly endless, too! I ended up making quite a few while taking pictures for this tutorial.

  23. kiwi says:

    I would love to see more dremel tutorials, as it is sometimes not clear HOW MUCH you can do with it. Cool!

  24. Caresse says:

    These are sooooooo awesome! I love my Dremel! I am going to have to make some of these! Also just an FYI on the spoons, you can get a 5 pack of the Cheapo spoons for a dollar at Wal-Mart!

  25. Caresse says:

    Also forgot to mention that if you make a mistake when you are drawing with your Sharpie, rubbing alchohol on some cotton or tissue will take it off.

  26. sactownsue says:

    This is a fun and cool idea to add to my list…
    You could probably wrap the jaws of the pliers with masking tape to prevent scratches, or buy the ones with the nylon jaws.
    Last year someone was filling spoons with resin. You could combine the two or melt some plastic in it!
    I wanna try that glass etching with a Dremel.

  27. Brittnie says:

    Please can you tell me what kind of bit you used excatly?! there are sooo many differetn types of Tungsten Carbide Cutters:( i would really appreciate it!!

  28. sweets4ever says:

    Hi Brittnie! I’m sure there are various ones you can use, but I use the one [on the right] in this picture http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/IMG_0048-1.jpg

    My manual says: “These are tough, long-lived cutters for use on hardened steel, fired ceramics, and other very hard materials. They can be use for engraving on tools and garden equipment. 1/8″ shanks.”

    There is no model or style # provided for it in the manual, but here is Dremel’s page for this type of bit http://www.dremel.com/en-us/AttachmentsAndAccessories/Pages/CategoryProducts.aspx?catid=72&catname=Tungsten+Carbide+Cutters There are only nine available and it’s definitely not one of the five pointed ones, so that brings it down to four options. Basically, you’re looking for something that will allow you to grind sideways to enlarge the hole.

    Be sure to wear gloves, safety glasses and work slowly! :)

  29. Beth says:

    It is a really cool! Of course, after I saw your blog, I had to pull out my Dremel and flexshaft and try it.

    I do have to ask you one question. After working on the spoon I had so much of the metal slivers in my skin that it took a few days to finally feel like they were all out. (Taking lots of showers.)

    Is there a way to prevent getting pummeled by the metal in the first place? I tried wearing a long sleeved shirt, but there is always skin exposed. I have also decided to wear a particle mask while I do this project, just to make sure none of the miniscule metal shards enter my lungs.

    Any tips you’ve learned?

  30. Sue says:

    Hi,
    I got some spoons today. Already have the dremel. Then ivreslized the spoons are stainless steel. Will that be a problem? Can’t wait to try it! !! Thanks for your inspiration.

  31. sweets4ever says:

    Hi, Beth! I didn’t have any issues with slivers. How about pairing gloves (thick work gloves) with a long-sleeved shirt?

  32. sweets4ever says:

    Hello, Sue! Not at all! That’s actually what I used, too. Have fun! Can’t wait to see what you create!

  33. Kenneth Scott says:

    This is incredible. I can’t believe I haven’t see this before. Thank you so much for the info and inspiration. I have all the tools in my game-room except a tungsten cutting tool/bit? Maybe I can find at Lowe’s? MY 4 year old daughter is so excited to work on these projects with me (not the dremel parts of course) and I designing ideas right now!

  34. Beverly says:

    Hi! Great idea and t.y. so much for sharing! I needto know is the bit you used the one that originally came with my dremel?? Dont want to tare it up if it’s not the rite one! Thanks!

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